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8 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • 2012-2021
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  • Other research product . InteractiveResource . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: ARCHON Research School of Archaeology
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 2 of the Rchon statistics course. The purpose of this tutorial is to extend the application of R from basic data analysis and visualisation to formal statistical testing. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: t-test ANOVA Further testing methods (including chi square test, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test) will be treated in part 3 and 4 of this course. Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 2.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and four datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2021. Rchon statistics course, part 2. Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.5155471

  • Other research product . InteractiveResource . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: ARCHON Research School of Archaeology
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 1 of the Rchon statistics course. It treats the basics of data manipulation in R, and teaches you how to make simple visualisations from a list of numerical data.The purpose of this tutorial is to provide a relatively gentle introduction to R for working with archaeological datasets. Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 1.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and three datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2020. Rchon statistics course, part 1. Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. doi: 10.5281/zenodo.4094686

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2014
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tynan, Jane;
    Publisher: The Conversation
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Shumilovskikh, Lyudmila S; Hopper, Kristen; Djamali, Morteza; Ponel, Philippe; Demory, François; Rostek, Frauke; Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Bittmann, Felix; Golyeva, Alexandra; Guibal, Frédéric; +10 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: EC | PERSIA (295375)

    The Gorgan Plain (NE Iran) is characterized by fertile soils formed on a loess plateau and is at present primarily exploited for intensive agriculture. However, the timing and intensity of the human impact on the landscape in the past are still unclear. A sediment core, taken from the centre of the eastern Gorgan Plain in the Kongor Lake covering the major part of the Holocene from 6.1 to 0.8 ka (all ages are calibrated before present), has been studied for pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, botanical macroremains, insects, charcoal, geochemistry, biomarkers and magnetism in order to provide new insights into the evolution of the landscape and to estimate the intensity of human activities. The data obtained suggest a dry period between 5.9 and 3.9 ka and an increase in regional humidity afterwards with a maximum between 2.7 and 0.7 ka, during the period of the Persian empires (Achaemenid through Sasanian) and the Islamic era. The eastern part of the Gorgan Plain was characterized by open steppe landscapes during the last 6 ka, which most likely were used for pasture and at least since 2.7 ka for agriculture including arboriculture. The strongest anthropogenic impact on the environment around the Kongor site is documented during the Parthian and Sasanian Empires (200 BC–651 AD) and the Islamic era up to the eve of the Mongol invasion.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Reinanda, R.; Odijk, D.; de Rijke, M.;
    Publisher: TAIA '13
    Project: NWO | Building Rich Links to En... (2300153702), EC | LIMOSINE (288024), EC | PROMISE (258191), NWO | Semantic Search in E-Disc... (2300168486), NWO | SPuDisc: Searching Public... (2300176811), NWO | Modeling and Learning fro... (2300171779)
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Traub, Myriam; Ossenbruggen, Jacco;
    Publisher: CWI

    This document reports on the discussions and results of the Workshop on Tool Criticism in the Digital Humanities, that took place on May 22, 2015 in Pand 020, Amsterdam. The workshop was co-organized by Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, the eHumanities group of KNAW and the Amsterdam Data Science Center.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Woolderink, H.A.G.; Cohen, Kim M.;
    Publisher: Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS)
    Country: Netherlands

    This dataset "Digital Basemap for the Lower Meuse Valley Palaeogeography” provides a detailed reconstruction of the Lower Meuse Valley since the Weichselian Late Pleniglacial. It covers the Meuse reach between Maastricht and Nijmegen (The Netherlands). The Meuse valley provides an outstanding example of geomorphological preservation of terrace elements of different fluvial styles, produced during the Weichselian Lateglacial and Holocene. By means of compiling an Age Determination Database (Access tables) and a vector polygon geological map (ArcGIS), shapefiles were produced that give overview of the age of series of terraces and of the paleogeography of the active river bed. The setup of database and GIS is such that it unlocks the information hidden in older published sources and institutional databases (i.e. from journal papers, archaeological reports, geological survey mapping activities, university fieldworks, etc.) in a modern, quick to use but still to trace form. The digital basemap and underpinning ID database were created using the same software setup and database structure as the 2012 Rhine-Meuse Delta Digital Base Map elsewhere on this depository website [ https://doi.org/10.17026/dans-x7g-sjtw ]. In the north of the study area, where coverage overlaps, the new maps here updates the 2012 version. Production of this dataset is part of the project: “Reconstruction and Modelling of the Meuse- and Rhine River. Sinuosity Response to Faulting in the Roer Valley Rift System” funded by The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO; project nr. 821.01.011). The first peer-reviewed publication using the dataset is: “Spatial and temporal variations in river terrace formation, preservation and morphology. Lower Meuse Valley, the Netherlands” (Woolderink et al., exp. 2018).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Burckel, Pierre; Waelbroeck, Claire; Luo, Yiming; Roche, Didier M; Pichat, Sylvain; Jaccard, Samuel L; Gherardi, Jeanne-Marie; Govin, Aline; Lippold, Jörg; Thil, François;
    Publisher: PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science
    Project: SNSF | Quantifying changes in th... (111588), EC | ACCLIMATE (339108), SNSF | SeaO2 - Past changes in S... (144811), ANR | RETRO (ANR-09-BLAN-0347)

    We reconstruct the geometry and strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation during Heinrich Stadial 2 and three Greenland interstadials of the 20-50 ka period based on the comparison of new and published sedimentary 231Pa/230Th data with simulated sedimentary 231Pa/230Th. We show that the deep Atlantic circulation during these interstadials was very different from that of the Holocene. Northern-sourced waters likely circulated above 2500 m depth, with a flow rate lower than that of the present day North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Southern-sourced deep waters most probably flowed northwards below 4000 m depth into the North Atlantic basin, and then southwards as a return flow between 2500 and 4000 m depth. The flow rate of this southern-sourced deep water was likely larger than that of the modern Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Our results further show that during Heinrich Stadial 2, the deep Atlantic was probably directly affected by a southern-sourced water mass below 2500 m depth, while a slow southward flowing water mass originating from the North Atlantic likely influenced depths between 1500 and 2500 m down to the equator.