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  • A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2008 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample.; Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I.; Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later.; Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. ; For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent; Wave II: 88.6 percent; Wave III: 77.4 percent; Wave IV: 80.3 percent; Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI) computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) computer-assisted self interview (CASI) paper and pencil interview (PAPI) face-to-face interview

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  • Authors: Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Udry, J. Richard;

    Downloads of Add Health require submission of the following information, which is shared with the original producer of Add Health: supervisor name, supervisor email, and reason for download. A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2018 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Wave V data collection took place from 2016 to 2018, when the original Wave I respondents were 33 to 43 years old. For the first time, a mixed mode survey design was used. In addition, several experiments were embedded in early phases of the data collection to test response to various treatments. A similar range of data was collected on social, environmental, economic, behavioral, and health circumstances of respondents, with the addition of retrospective child health and socio-economic status questions. Physical measurements and biospecimens were again collected at Wave V, and included most of the same measures as at Wave IV. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS32: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample DS33: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Pregnancy, Live Births, Children and Parenting) DS34: Wave V: Biomarkers, Anthropometrics DS35: Wave V: Biomarkers, Cardiovascular Measures DS36: Wave V: Biomarkers, Demographics DS37: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS38: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS39: Wave V: Biomarkers, Lipids DS40: Wave V: Biomarkers, Medication Use DS41: Wave V: Biomarkers, Renal Function DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample. Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I. Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later. Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. Wave V: All Wave I respondents who were still living were eligible at Wave V, yielding a pool of 19,828 persons. This pool was split into three stratified random samples for the purposes of survey design testing. For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI); computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI); computer-assisted self interview (CASI); face-to-face interview; mixed mode; paper and pencil interview (PAPI); telephone interviewWave V data files were minimally processed by ICPSR. For value labeling, missing value designation, and question text (where applicable), please see the available P.I. Codebook/Questionnaires. The study-level documentation (Data Guide, User Guide) does not include Wave V datasets.Documentation for Waves prior to Wave V may use an older version of the study title.Users should be aware that version history notes dated prior to 2015-11-09 do not apply to the current organization of the datasets.Please note that dates present in the Summary and Time Period fields are taken from the Add Health Study Design page. The Date of Collection field represents the range of interview dates present in the data files for each wave.Wave I and Wave II field work was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.Wave III, Wave IV, and Wave V field work was conducted by the Research Triangle Institute.For the most updated list of related publications, please see the Add Health Publications Web site.Additional information on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) series can be found on the Add Health Web site. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Wave V aimed to track the emergence of chronic disease as the cohort aged into their 30s and early 40s. Add health is a school-based longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of adolescents in grates 7-12 in the United States in 1945-45. Over more than 20 years of data collection, data have been collected from adolescents, their fellow students, school administrators, parents, siblings, friends, and romantic partners through multiple data collection components. In addition, existing databases with information about respondents' neighborhoods and communities have been merged with Add Health data, including variables on income poverty, unemployment, availability and utilization of health services, crime, church membership, and social programs and policies. The data files are not weighted. However, the collection features a number of weight variables contained within the following datasets: DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Please note that these weights files do not apply to the Biomarker data files. For additional information on the application of weights for data analysis, please see the ICPSR User Guide, or the Guidelines for Analyzing Add Health Data. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent Wave II: 88.6 percent Wave III: 77.4 percent Wave IV: 80.3 percent Wave V: 71.8 percent Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States.

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Tiedemann, Jörg; Scherrer, Yves;

    This release contains data sets for experiments with document-level machine translation. The data sets have been used in previous studies and provided here for replicability and comparison with other systems. The data sets are taken from the English-German news translation task at WMT 2019 and the English-German bitext in the OpenSubtitles collection v2016 from OPUS. All data sets are sentence aligned with corresponding lines being aligned to each other. Document boundaries are marked with empty lines (on both sides of the parallel corpus). The data set has been used in the following publication: @inproceedings{scherrer-tiedemann-loaiciga-2019, title = "Analysing concatenation approaches to document-level NMT in two different domains", author = {Scherrer, Yves and Tiedemann, J{\"o}rg and Lo{\'a}iciga, Sharid}, booktitle = "Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Discourse in Machine Translation", month = nov, year = "2019", address = "Hong-Kong", publisher = "Association for Computational Linguistics", } Please, cite that paper if you use the data set in your own work. {"references": ["Scherrer, Tiedemann and Lo\u00e1iciga: \"Analysing concatenation approaches to document-level NMT in two different domains\", in Proceedings of DiscoMT2019 at EMNLP 2019, Hong-Kong"]}

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    ZENODO
    Dataset . 2019
    License: CC BY
    Data sources: ZENODO
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    ZENODO
    Dataset . 2019
    License: CC BY
    Data sources: Datacite
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      ZENODO
      Dataset . 2019
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      ZENODO
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    Authors: Oksanen, Eljas; Saarenpää, Ida; Lahtinen, Anu;

    This dataset contains a proof-of-concept GIS database of over 29,000 individual historical road polyline segments as a shapefile dataset, covering over 11,000 km2 in the western Finland from the city of Turku to northern parts of the province of Satakunta. These polylines capture the regional layout of the overland transport infrastructure of late nineteenth and early twentieth century Finland. {"references": ["Oksanen, Eljas, Saarenp\u00e4\u00e4, Ida. and Lahtinen, Anu. 2023. The HISCOM Project. Exploring Methodologies for Large-scale Digitisation of Historical Roadways. SKAS 2/2022, 8-14"]}

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    ZENODO
    Dataset . 2023
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    ZENODO
    Dataset . 2023
    License: CC BY
    Data sources: ZENODO
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    ZENODO
    Dataset . 2023
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      ZENODO
      Dataset . 2023
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      ZENODO
      Dataset . 2023
      License: CC BY
      Data sources: ZENODO
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  • These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time; the data are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection. As the study is further processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be able to access the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues. The Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) survey series is an ongoing nationally representative longitudinal study focusing especially on differences between Black and White Americans in middle and late life. These data constitute the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth waves in a panel survey covering a wide range of sociological, psychological, mental, and physical health items. Wave I of the study began in 1986 with a nation face-to-face survey of 3,617 adults ages 25 and up, with Black Americans and people aged 60 and over over-sampled at twice the rate of the others. Wave II constitutes face-to-face re-interviews in 1989 of those still alive. Survivors have been re-interviewed by telephone, and when necessary face-to-face, in 1994, 2001/02, and 2011, making up Waves III, IV, and V of the data. ACL was designed and sought out to investigate the following: (1) the ways in which a wide range of activities and social relationships that people engage in are broadly "productive," (2) how individuals adapt to acute life events and chronic stresses that threaten the maintenance of health, effective functioning, and productive activity, and (3) sociocultural variations in the nature, meaning, determinants, and consequences of productive activity and relationships. Among the topics covered are interpersonal relationships (spouse/partner, children, parents, friends), sources and levels of satisfaction, social interactions and leisure activities, traumatic life events (physical assault, serious illness, divorce, death of a loved one, financial or legal problems), perceptions of retirement, health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight, rest), and utilization of health care services (doctor visits, hospitalization, nursing home institutionalization, bed days). Also included are measures of physical health, psychological well-being, and indices referring to cognitive functioning. Demographic information provided for individuals includes household composition, number of children and grandchildren, employment status, occupation and work history, income, family financial situation, religious beliefs and practices, ethnicity, race, education, sex, and region of residence. For Wave I, a multistage stratified area probability sample with oversampling of Blacks and those aged 60 and older was used. For Wave II, an attempt was made to contact all respondents from Wave I (N = 3,617). The number of respondents that participated in Wave II was 2,867. For Wave III, an attempt was made to contact all the respondents from Waves I and II. The number of respondents that participated in Wave III was 2,562. For Wave IV, an attempt was made to contact all respondents from Waves I, II, and III. The number of respondents that participated in Wave IV was 1,787. Finally, for Wave V, an attempt was made to contact all respondents from Waves I, II, III, and IV. The number of respondents that participated in Wave V was 1,427. In addition, some Wave III, IV, and V interviews were done by proxy respondents and not by the original Wave I respondents. [Wave III - N=164; Wave IV - N=95; Wave V - N=108] ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.. Response Rates: Response rates for Waves I-V with a beginning sample size of 3,617 are as follows: Wave I - 68-70 percent, Wave II - 83 percent, Wave III - 83 percent, Wave IV - 76-80 percent, and Wave V - 81 percent. The continental United States' household population aged 25 and older, exclusive of residents of Alaska and Hawaii. Smallest Geographic Unit: region For information on study design, users should refer to the ICPSR Technical Documentation, as well as visit the Americans' Changing Lives Web site. computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) Datasets: DS1: Dataset face-to-face interview telephone interview

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  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Strauss, Jens; Biasi, Christina; Sanders, Tina; Abbott, Benjamin W; +17 Authors

    This dataset merges nitrogen data from the Yedoma domain. It includes numerous fieldwork campaigns, which take place since 1998. In total 467 samples from the active layer (seasonally thawed layer), 175 samples from perennially frozen Holocene cover deposits, 479 samples from thermokarst deposits in drained thermokarst, 175 in-situ thawed, diagenetically (anaerobic microbial decomposition possible during unfrozen phase) altered Yedoma deposits (called Taberite), and 917 samples from frozen Yedoma deposits are included. Moreover it includes a NH4+ and NO3- quantification basing on of 658 samples, including 378 data points for NH4+ (active layer, 93; Holocene cover, 108; thermokarst sediment, 138; Taberite, 0; Yedoma deposit, 39) and 542 data points for NO3- (active layer, 94; Holocene cover, 137; thermokarst sediment, 119; Taberite, 6; Yedoma deposit, 186). The bootstrapping code we adjusted for this study is available from Zenodo (Jongejans & Strauss, 2020, doi:10.5281/zenodo.3734247). The code is published under a GNU General Public License v3.0. The included areal estimation of the Yedoma domain was used from the IRYP database (Strauss et al., 2022, doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.940078).

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    PANGAEA
    Dataset . 2022
    Data sources: B2FIND
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
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      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ PANGAEAarrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      PANGAEA
      Dataset . 2022
      Data sources: B2FIND
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  • The Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) is a collaborative, interdisciplinary investigation of patterns, predictors, and consequences of midlife development in the areas of physical health, psychological well-being, and social responsibility. A description of the study and findings from it are available at http://www.midus.wisc.edu. The first wave of the MIDUS study (MIDUS 1 or M1) collected survey data from a total of 7,108 participants. The baseline sample was comprised of individuals from four subsamples: (1) a national RDD (random digit dialing) sample (n=3,487); (2) oversamples from five metropolitan areas in the U.S. (n=757); (3) siblings of individuals from the RDD sample (n=950); and (4) a national RDD sample of twin pairs (n=1,914). All eligible participants were non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults in the coterminous United States, aged 25 to 74. Data from the samples were collected primarily in 1995/96. The survey (Project 1) dataset contains responses from a 30-minute Phone interview and two 50-page Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) instruments. Of the 7,108 respondents who completed the Phone interview, 6,325 also completed the SAQ. This updated version of the study is comprised of three primary datasets: Dataset 1, Main, Siblings, and Twin Data, contains responses from the main survey of 7,108 respondents. Respondents were asked to provide extensive information on their physical and mental health throughout their adult lives, and to assess the ways in which their lifestyles, including relationships and work-related demands, contributed to the conditions experienced. Those queried were asked to describe their histories of physical ailments, including heart-related conditions and cancer, as well as the treatment and/or lifestyle changes they went through as a result. A series of questions addressed alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use, and focused on history of use, regularity of use, attempts to quit, and how the use of those substances affected respondents' physical and mental well-being. Additional questions addressed respondents' sense of control over their health, their awareness of changes in their medical conditions, commitment to regular exercise and a healthy diet, experience with menopause, the decision-making process used to deal with health concerns, experiences with nontraditional remedies or therapies, and history of attending support groups. Respondents were asked to compare their overall well-being with that of their peers and to describe social, physical, and emotional characteristics typical of adults in their 20's, 40's, and 60's. Information on the work histories of respondents and their significant others was also elicited, with items covering the nature of their occupations, work-related physical and emotional demands, and how their personal health had correlated to their jobs. An additional series of questions focusing on childhood queried respondents regarding the presence/absence of their parents, religion, rules/punishments, love/affection, physical/verbal abuse, and the quality of their relationships with their parents and siblings. Respondents were also asked to consider their personal feelings of accomplishment, desire to learn, sense of control over their lives, interests, and hopes for the future. The Datasets previously numbered 2 and 3 have been removed to avoid redundancies, and all datasets have been renumbered. Please refer to the readme file. Dataset 2, Twin Screener Data, provides the first national sample of twin pairs ascertained randomly via the telephone. Dataset 3, Coded Text Responses, describes how open-ended textual responses in the MIDUS 1 Computer-Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) and Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) were transformed into categorical numeric codes. These codes are included in a stand-alone dataset containing only those cases (N=3,950) that contained text data in their responses. Online Analysis Only: Datasets 1, 2, and 3 were merged together by the SU_ID variable to form "Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only)" (Dataset 4) for online analysis capabilities. MIDUS also maintains a Colectica portal, which allows users to interact with variables across waves and create customized subsets. Registration is required. ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Created online analysis version with question text.; Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.. Presence of Common Scales: Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) Scale; Somatic Amplification Scale; The Alcohol Screening Test; The Conflict Tactics (CT) Scales; The Revised Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS2); Loyola Generativity Scale (LGS); Many scales were constructed for use in the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS 1), 1995-1996 Study. For additional information on scale construction and sources, please refer to the scale documentation included with the data collection. Respondents were drawn from a nationally representative random-digit-dial sample of non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25-74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Those queried participated in an initial telephone interview and responded to a mail questionnaire. Please see the Descriptions of Midlife in the United Sates (MIDUS) Samples documentation provided by ICPSR for more detailed information. Respondents were drawn from a nationally representative random-digit-dial sample of non-institutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25-74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Those queried participated in an initial telephone interview and responded to a mail questionnaire. Smallest Geographic Unit: None Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Main, Siblings and Twin Data DS2: Twin Screener Data DS3: Coded Text Data DS4: Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only) DS6: Midlife in the United States (MIDUS 1), 1995-1996, Merged Data with Weights (Online Analysis Only) Response Rates: The response rate for the national Random-Digit Dialing (RDD) sample was 70 percent. The Self-Administered Questionnaire (SAQ) follow-up response rate was 89 percent. computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Series self-enumerated questionnaire mail questionnaire

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  • Authors: Ryff, Carol; Almeida, David M.; Ayanian, John; Carr, Deborah S.; +14 Authors

    In 1995-1996, the MacArthur Midlife Research Network carried out a national survey of 7,108 Americans aged 25 to 74 (MIDLIFE IN THE UNITED STATES (MIDUS), 1995-1996 [ICPSR 2760]). The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of behavioral, psychological, and social factors in understanding age-related differences in physical and mental health. The study was innovative for its broad scientific scope, its diverse samples (which included twins and the siblings of main sample respondents), and its creative use of in-depth assessments in key areas (e.g., daily stress and cognitive functioning). A description of the study and findings from it are available at http://www.midus.wisc.edu. With support from the National Institute on Aging, a longitudinal follow-up of the original MIDUS samples: core sample (N = 3,487), metropolitan over-samples (N = 757), twins (N = 925 complete pairs), and siblings (N = 950), was conducted in 2004-2006. Guiding hypotheses for it, at the most general level, were that behavioral and psychosocial factors are consequential for physical and mental health. MIDUS II respondents were aged 35 to 86. Data collection largely repeated baseline assessments (e.g., phone interview and extensive self-administered questionnaire), with additional questions in selected areas (e.g., cognitive functioning, optimism and coping, stressful life events, and caregiving). To add refinements to MIDUS II, an African American sample (N = 592) was recruited from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, who participated in a personal interview and completed a questionnaire paralleling the above assessments. Also administered was a modified form of the mail questionnaire, via telephone, to respondents who did not complete a self-administered questionnaire. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI), computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI), computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI), mail questionnaire, telephone interview The data in this collection can be linked to the following MIDUS studies by using the variable M2ID: ICPSR 2760, 22840, 25281, 26841, 28683, and 29282.The missing value assignments for the following variables have been reduced from 9-10 digits in length to a maximum of 8 digits in length due to a limitation in Stata: B1SG17A, B1SG18A, B1SG18B, B1SG19A, B1SG21B, BASG22A, B1SG24A, B1SG25A, B1SG25B, B1SG25C, B1SG25D, B1SG25E, B1SG25F, B1SG25G, B1SG25H, AND B1SG25I.The DDI codebook (PDF file) and the XML file (contained in a zip package) released by ICPSR were provided by MIDUS and were not changed in any way by ICPSR. These original files do not reflect any of the processing done by ICPSR.The online analysis (SDA) file is a merged file comprised of the four datasets within this data collection. The files were merged using the variable M2ID. Users of this merged file should review the information in the "Documentation of Post-stratification Weights Created at MIDUS II," available through the ICPSR and NACDA Web sites, prior to analysis.A document pertaining to the naming conventions for this study has been added to the collection.The title of this study was changed from National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS II), 2004-2006, to Midlife in the United States (MIDUS 2), 2004-2006, on May 9, 2017. The respondents to this study were first interviewed as part of the NATIONAL SURVEY OF MIDLIFE DEVELOPMENT IN THE UNITED STATES (MIDUS), 1995-1996 (ICPSR 2760). MIDUS was based on a nationally representative random-digit-dial (RDD) sample of noninstitutionalized, English-speaking adults, aged 25 to 74, selected from working telephone banks in the coterminous United States. Predesignated households were selected in random replicates, one-fourth of which included a special nonrespondent incentive component. Contact persons were informed that the survey was being carried out through the Harvard Medical School and that it was designed to study health and well-being during the middle years of life. After explaining the study to the informant, a household listing was generated of people in the age range of 25 to 74, and a random respondent was selected. Oversampling of older people and men was achieved by varying the probability of carrying out the interview at this stage as a joint function of the age and sex of the randomly selected respondent. No other person in the household was selected if the respondent did not complete the interview. There was no additional sampling of cases for the longitudinal component of MIDUS II -- it was a follow-up study and attempted to recontact original MIDUS participants. More information about the MIDUS II sample can be found in the document "Descriptions of MIDUS Samples," available for download through the ICPSR and NACDA Web sites. ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection: Standardized missing values.; Created online analysis version with question text.; Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.. Response Rates: Detailed information regarding the response rates for various aspects of the MIDUS II data collection is located in the following documents: "Descriptions of MIDUS Samples" and "Field Report for MIDUS II Longitudinal Sample." These documents are available for download through the ICPSR and NACDA Web sites. Presence of Common Scales: See the document "Documentation of Psychosocial Constructs and Composite Variables in MIDUS II Project 1" available through the ICPSR and NACDA Web sites for complete information regarding the scales for the MIDUS II data collection. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: M2_P1_Aggregate Data DS2: M2_P1_Disposition Codes DS3: M2_P1_Main Weights Data DS4: M2_P1_Coded Text Data The noninstitutionalized, English-speaking population of the United States. Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Series

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