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85 Research products, page 1 of 9

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2018-2022
  • Article
  • European Commission
  • IT
  • Archivio della ricerca- Università di Roma La Sapienza
  • Scientometrics

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Simona Arrighi; Adriana Moroni; Laura Tassoni; Francesco Boschin; Federica Badino; Eugenio Bortolini; Paolo Boscato; Jacopo Crezzini; Carla Figus; Manuela Forte; +10 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SUCCESS (724046)

    The arrival of Modern Humans (MHs) in Europe between 50 ka and 36 ka coincides with significant changes in human behaviour, regarding the production of tools, the exploitation of resources and the systematic use of ornaments and colouring substances. The emergence of the so-called modern behaviours is usually associated with MHs, although in these last decades findings relating to symbolic thinking of pre-Sapiens groups have been claimed. In this paper we present a synthesis of the Italian evidence concerning bone manufacturing and the use of ornaments and pigments in the time span encompassing the demise of Neandertals and their replacement by MHs. Current data show that Mousterian bone tools are mostly obtained from bone fragments used as is. Conversely an organized production of fine shaped bone tools is characteristic of the Uluzzian and the Protoaurignacian, when the complexity inherent in the manufacturing processes suggests that bone artefacts are not to be considered as expedient resources. Some traces of symbolic activities are associated to Neandertals in Northern Italy. Ornaments (mostly tusk shells) and pigments used for decorative purposes are well recorded during the Uluzzian. Their features and distribution witness to an intriguing cultural homogeneity within this technocomplex. The Protoaurignacian is characterized by a wider archaeological evidence, consisting of personal ornaments (mostly pierced gastropods), pigments and artistic items.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dusan Boric; Thomas Higham; Emanuela Cristiani; Vesna Dimitrijević; Olaf Nehlich; Seren Griffiths; Craig Alexander; Bojana Mihailović; Dragana Filipović; Ethel Allué; +1 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group, London
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, United Kingdom, Serbia
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286), EC | MESO-NEO TECHNOLOGY (273575)

    AbstractThe archaeological site of Lepenski Vir is widely known after its remarkable stone art sculptures that represent a unique and unprecedented case of Holocene hunter-gatherer creativity. These artworks were found largely associated with equally unique trapezoidal limestone building floors around their centrally located rectangular stone-lined hearths. A debate has raged since the discovery of the site about the chronological place of various discovered features. While over years different views from that of the excavator about the stratigraphy and chronology of the site have been put forward, some major disagreements about the chronological position of the features that make this site a key point of reference in European Prehistory persist. Despite challenges of re-analyzing the site’s stratigraphy from the original excavation records, taphonomic problems, and issues of reservoir offsets when providing radiocarbon measurements on human and dog bones, our targeted AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dating of various contexts from this site with the application of Bayesian statistical modelling allows us to propose with confidence a new and sound chronological framework and provide formal estimates for several key developments represented in the archaeological record of Lepenski Vir that help us in understanding the transition of last foragers to first farmers in southeast Europe as a whole.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ambrosetti, Elena; Miccoli, Sara; Strangio, Donatella;
    Publisher: Bancaria editrice
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PERCEPTIONS (833870)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bevilacqua, Michele; Rexhina Blloshmi; Navigli, Roberto;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | MOUSSE (726487), EC | ELEXIS (731015)

    In Text-to-AMR parsing, current state-of-the-art semantic parsers use cumbersome pipelines integrating several different modules or components, and exploit graph recategorization, i.e., a set of content-specific heuristics that are developed on the basis of the training set. However, the generalizability of graph recategorization in an out-of-distribution setting is unclear. In contrast, state-of-the-art AMR-to-Text generation, which can be seen as the inverse to parsing, is based on simpler seq2seq. In this paper, we cast Text-to-AMR and AMR-to-Text as a symmetric transduction task and show that by devising a careful graph linearization and extending a pretrained encoder-decoder model, it is possible to obtain state-of-the-art performances in both tasks using the very same seq2seq approach, i.e., SPRING (Symmetric PaRsIng aNd Generation). Our model does not require complex pipelines, nor heuristics built on heavy assumptions. In fact, we drop the need for graph recategorization, showing that this technique is actually harmful outside of the standard benchmark. Finally, we outperform the previous state of the art on the English AMR 2.0 dataset by a large margin: on Text-to-AMR we obtain an improvement of 3.6 Smatch points, while on AMR-to-Text we outperform the state of the art by 11.2 BLEU points. We release the software at github.com/SapienzaNLP/spring.

  • Publication . Preprint . Conference object . Article . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pasini, Tommaso; Camacho-Collados, Jose;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | MOUSSE (726487)

    Large sense-annotated datasets are increasingly necessary for training deep supervised systems in Word Sense Disambiguation. However, gathering high-quality sense-annotated data for as many instances as possible is a laborious and expensive task. This has led to the proliferation of automatic and semi-automatic methods for overcoming the so-called knowledge-acquisition bottleneck. In this short survey we present an overview of sense-annotated corpora, annotated either manually- or (semi)automatically, that are currently available for different languages and featuring distinct lexical resources as inventory of senses, i.e. WordNet, Wikipedia, BabelNet. Furthermore, we provide the reader with general statistics of each dataset and an analysis of their specific features. 7 pages, 1 figure, 1 table

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . Article . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Roderik Bruce; A. Abramov; Alessandro Bertarelli; Maria Ilaria Besana; Federico Carra; F. Cerutti; Angeles Faus-Golfe; Maria Fiascaris; G. Gobbi; A. M. Krainer; +10 more
    Countries: France, Italy
    Project: EC | EuroCirCol (654305)

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) is being designed as a 100 km ring that should collide 50 TeV proton beams. At 8.3 GJ, its stored beam energy will be a factor 28 higher than what has been achieved in the Large Hadron Collider, which has the highest stored beam energy among the colliders built so far. This puts unprecedented demands on the control of beam losses and collimation, since even a tiny beam loss risks quenching superconducting magnets. We present in this article the design of the FCC-hh collimation system and study the beam cleaning through simulations of tracking, energy deposition, and thermo-mechanical response. We investigate the collimation performance for design beam loss scenarios and potential bottlenecks are highlighted. Proceedings of the 10th Int. Particle Accelerator Conf., IPAC2019, Melbourne, Australia

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanessa Forte; O. Tarquini; Michela Botticelli; Laura Medeghini;
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | TraCTUs (702493)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alessia Nava; Elena Fiorin; Andrea Zupancich; Marialetizia Carra; Claudio Ottoni; Gabriele Di Carlo; Iole Vozza; Orlando Brugnoletti; Francesca Alhaique; Renata Grifoni Cremonesi; +4 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, Italy
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286)

    AbstractThis paper provides results from a suite of analyses made on human dental material from the Late Palaeolithic to Neolithic strata of the cave site of Grotta Continenza situated in the Fucino Basin of the Abruzzo region of central Italy. The available human remains from this site provide a unique possibility to study ways in which forager versus farmer lifeways affected human odonto-skeletal remains. The main aim of our study is to understand palaeodietary patterns and their changes over time as reflected in teeth. These analyses involve a review of metrics and oral pathologies, micro-fossils preserved in the mineralized dental plaque, macrowear, and buccal microwear. Our results suggest that these complementary approaches support the assumption about a critical change in dental conditions and status with the introduction of Neolithic foodstuff and habits. However, we warn that different methodologies applied here provide data at different scales of resolution for detecting such changes and a multipronged approach to the study of dental collections is needed for a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of diachronic changes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio Cavazzuti; Robin Skeates; Andrew R. Millard; G. M. Nowell; Joanne Peterkin; Marie Bernabò Brea; Andrea Cardarelli; Luciano Salzani;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, Italy
    Project: EC | Ex-SPACE (702930)

    This study investigates to what extent Bronze Age societies in Northern Italy were permeable accepting and integrating non-local individuals, as well as importing a wide range of raw materials, commodities, and ideas from networks spanning continental Europe and the Mediterranean. During the second millennium BC, the communities of Northern Italy engaged in a progressive stabilization of settlements, culminating in the large polities of the end of the Middle/beginning of the Late Bronze Age pivoted around large defended centres (the Terramare). Although a wide range of exotic archaeological materials indicates that the inhabitants of the Po plain increasingly took part in the networks of Continental European and the Eastern Mediterranean, we should not overlook the fact that the dynamics of interaction were also extremely active on local and regional levels. Mobility patterns have been explored for three key-sites, spanning the Early to Late Bronze Age (1900–1100 BC), namely Sant’Eurosia, Casinalbo and Fondo Paviani, through strontium and oxygen isotope analysis on a large sample size (more than 100 individuals). The results, integrated with osteological and archaeological data, document for the first time in this area that movements of people occurred mostly within a territorial radius of 50 km, but also that larger nodes in the settlement system (such as Fondo Paviani) included individuals from more distant areas. This suggests that, from a demographic perspective, the process towards a more complex socio-political system in Bronze Age Northern Italy was triggered by a largely, but not completely, internal process, stemming from the dynamics of intra-polity networks and local/regional power relationships.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Flavia Venditti; Emanuela Cristiani; Stella Nunziante-Cesaro; Aviad Agam; Cristina Lemorini; Ran Barkai;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286)

    AbstractStone tools provide a unique window into the mode of adaptation and cognitive abilities of Lower Paleolithic early humans. The persistently produced large cutting tools (bifaces/handaxes) have long been an appealing focus of research in the reconstruction of Lower Paleolithic survival strategies, at the expenses of the small flake tools considered by-products of the stone production process rather than desired end products. Here, we use use-wear, residues and technological analyses to show direct and very early evidence of the deliberate production and use of small flakes for targeted stages of the prey butchery process at the late Lower Paleolithic Acheulian site of Revadim, Israel. We highlight the significant role of small flakes in Lower Paleolithic adaptation alongside the canonical large handaxes. Our results demonstrate the technological and cognitive flexibility of early human groups in the Levant and beyond at the threshold of the departure from Lower Paleolithic lifeways.

Advanced search in Research products
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arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
85 Research products, page 1 of 9
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Simona Arrighi; Adriana Moroni; Laura Tassoni; Francesco Boschin; Federica Badino; Eugenio Bortolini; Paolo Boscato; Jacopo Crezzini; Carla Figus; Manuela Forte; +10 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | SUCCESS (724046)

    The arrival of Modern Humans (MHs) in Europe between 50 ka and 36 ka coincides with significant changes in human behaviour, regarding the production of tools, the exploitation of resources and the systematic use of ornaments and colouring substances. The emergence of the so-called modern behaviours is usually associated with MHs, although in these last decades findings relating to symbolic thinking of pre-Sapiens groups have been claimed. In this paper we present a synthesis of the Italian evidence concerning bone manufacturing and the use of ornaments and pigments in the time span encompassing the demise of Neandertals and their replacement by MHs. Current data show that Mousterian bone tools are mostly obtained from bone fragments used as is. Conversely an organized production of fine shaped bone tools is characteristic of the Uluzzian and the Protoaurignacian, when the complexity inherent in the manufacturing processes suggests that bone artefacts are not to be considered as expedient resources. Some traces of symbolic activities are associated to Neandertals in Northern Italy. Ornaments (mostly tusk shells) and pigments used for decorative purposes are well recorded during the Uluzzian. Their features and distribution witness to an intriguing cultural homogeneity within this technocomplex. The Protoaurignacian is characterized by a wider archaeological evidence, consisting of personal ornaments (mostly pierced gastropods), pigments and artistic items.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dusan Boric; Thomas Higham; Emanuela Cristiani; Vesna Dimitrijević; Olaf Nehlich; Seren Griffiths; Craig Alexander; Bojana Mihailović; Dragana Filipović; Ethel Allué; +1 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group, London
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, United Kingdom, Serbia
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286), EC | MESO-NEO TECHNOLOGY (273575)

    AbstractThe archaeological site of Lepenski Vir is widely known after its remarkable stone art sculptures that represent a unique and unprecedented case of Holocene hunter-gatherer creativity. These artworks were found largely associated with equally unique trapezoidal limestone building floors around their centrally located rectangular stone-lined hearths. A debate has raged since the discovery of the site about the chronological place of various discovered features. While over years different views from that of the excavator about the stratigraphy and chronology of the site have been put forward, some major disagreements about the chronological position of the features that make this site a key point of reference in European Prehistory persist. Despite challenges of re-analyzing the site’s stratigraphy from the original excavation records, taphonomic problems, and issues of reservoir offsets when providing radiocarbon measurements on human and dog bones, our targeted AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) dating of various contexts from this site with the application of Bayesian statistical modelling allows us to propose with confidence a new and sound chronological framework and provide formal estimates for several key developments represented in the archaeological record of Lepenski Vir that help us in understanding the transition of last foragers to first farmers in southeast Europe as a whole.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ambrosetti, Elena; Miccoli, Sara; Strangio, Donatella;
    Publisher: Bancaria editrice
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PERCEPTIONS (833870)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bevilacqua, Michele; Rexhina Blloshmi; Navigli, Roberto;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | MOUSSE (726487), EC | ELEXIS (731015)

    In Text-to-AMR parsing, current state-of-the-art semantic parsers use cumbersome pipelines integrating several different modules or components, and exploit graph recategorization, i.e., a set of content-specific heuristics that are developed on the basis of the training set. However, the generalizability of graph recategorization in an out-of-distribution setting is unclear. In contrast, state-of-the-art AMR-to-Text generation, which can be seen as the inverse to parsing, is based on simpler seq2seq. In this paper, we cast Text-to-AMR and AMR-to-Text as a symmetric transduction task and show that by devising a careful graph linearization and extending a pretrained encoder-decoder model, it is possible to obtain state-of-the-art performances in both tasks using the very same seq2seq approach, i.e., SPRING (Symmetric PaRsIng aNd Generation). Our model does not require complex pipelines, nor heuristics built on heavy assumptions. In fact, we drop the need for graph recategorization, showing that this technique is actually harmful outside of the standard benchmark. Finally, we outperform the previous state of the art on the English AMR 2.0 dataset by a large margin: on Text-to-AMR we obtain an improvement of 3.6 Smatch points, while on AMR-to-Text we outperform the state of the art by 11.2 BLEU points. We release the software at github.com/SapienzaNLP/spring.

  • Publication . Preprint . Conference object . Article . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pasini, Tommaso; Camacho-Collados, Jose;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | MOUSSE (726487)

    Large sense-annotated datasets are increasingly necessary for training deep supervised systems in Word Sense Disambiguation. However, gathering high-quality sense-annotated data for as many instances as possible is a laborious and expensive task. This has led to the proliferation of automatic and semi-automatic methods for overcoming the so-called knowledge-acquisition bottleneck. In this short survey we present an overview of sense-annotated corpora, annotated either manually- or (semi)automatically, that are currently available for different languages and featuring distinct lexical resources as inventory of senses, i.e. WordNet, Wikipedia, BabelNet. Furthermore, we provide the reader with general statistics of each dataset and an analysis of their specific features. 7 pages, 1 figure, 1 table

  • Publication . Conference object . Other literature type . Article . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Roderik Bruce; A. Abramov; Alessandro Bertarelli; Maria Ilaria Besana; Federico Carra; F. Cerutti; Angeles Faus-Golfe; Maria Fiascaris; G. Gobbi; A. M. Krainer; +10 more
    Countries: France, Italy
    Project: EC | EuroCirCol (654305)

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) is being designed as a 100 km ring that should collide 50 TeV proton beams. At 8.3 GJ, its stored beam energy will be a factor 28 higher than what has been achieved in the Large Hadron Collider, which has the highest stored beam energy among the colliders built so far. This puts unprecedented demands on the control of beam losses and collimation, since even a tiny beam loss risks quenching superconducting magnets. We present in this article the design of the FCC-hh collimation system and study the beam cleaning through simulations of tracking, energy deposition, and thermo-mechanical response. We investigate the collimation performance for design beam loss scenarios and potential bottlenecks are highlighted. Proceedings of the 10th Int. Particle Accelerator Conf., IPAC2019, Melbourne, Australia

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanessa Forte; O. Tarquini; Michela Botticelli; Laura Medeghini;
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | TraCTUs (702493)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alessia Nava; Elena Fiorin; Andrea Zupancich; Marialetizia Carra; Claudio Ottoni; Gabriele Di Carlo; Iole Vozza; Orlando Brugnoletti; Francesca Alhaique; Renata Grifoni Cremonesi; +4 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, Italy
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286)

    AbstractThis paper provides results from a suite of analyses made on human dental material from the Late Palaeolithic to Neolithic strata of the cave site of Grotta Continenza situated in the Fucino Basin of the Abruzzo region of central Italy. The available human remains from this site provide a unique possibility to study ways in which forager versus farmer lifeways affected human odonto-skeletal remains. The main aim of our study is to understand palaeodietary patterns and their changes over time as reflected in teeth. These analyses involve a review of metrics and oral pathologies, micro-fossils preserved in the mineralized dental plaque, macrowear, and buccal microwear. Our results suggest that these complementary approaches support the assumption about a critical change in dental conditions and status with the introduction of Neolithic foodstuff and habits. However, we warn that different methodologies applied here provide data at different scales of resolution for detecting such changes and a multipronged approach to the study of dental collections is needed for a more comprehensive and nuanced understanding of diachronic changes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio Cavazzuti; Robin Skeates; Andrew R. Millard; G. M. Nowell; Joanne Peterkin; Marie Bernabò Brea; Andrea Cardarelli; Luciano Salzani;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Italy, Italy
    Project: EC | Ex-SPACE (702930)

    This study investigates to what extent Bronze Age societies in Northern Italy were permeable accepting and integrating non-local individuals, as well as importing a wide range of raw materials, commodities, and ideas from networks spanning continental Europe and the Mediterranean. During the second millennium BC, the communities of Northern Italy engaged in a progressive stabilization of settlements, culminating in the large polities of the end of the Middle/beginning of the Late Bronze Age pivoted around large defended centres (the Terramare). Although a wide range of exotic archaeological materials indicates that the inhabitants of the Po plain increasingly took part in the networks of Continental European and the Eastern Mediterranean, we should not overlook the fact that the dynamics of interaction were also extremely active on local and regional levels. Mobility patterns have been explored for three key-sites, spanning the Early to Late Bronze Age (1900–1100 BC), namely Sant’Eurosia, Casinalbo and Fondo Paviani, through strontium and oxygen isotope analysis on a large sample size (more than 100 individuals). The results, integrated with osteological and archaeological data, document for the first time in this area that movements of people occurred mostly within a territorial radius of 50 km, but also that larger nodes in the settlement system (such as Fondo Paviani) included individuals from more distant areas. This suggests that, from a demographic perspective, the process towards a more complex socio-political system in Bronze Age Northern Italy was triggered by a largely, but not completely, internal process, stemming from the dynamics of intra-polity networks and local/regional power relationships.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Flavia Venditti; Emanuela Cristiani; Stella Nunziante-Cesaro; Aviad Agam; Cristina Lemorini; Ran Barkai;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | HIDDEN FOODS (639286)

    AbstractStone tools provide a unique window into the mode of adaptation and cognitive abilities of Lower Paleolithic early humans. The persistently produced large cutting tools (bifaces/handaxes) have long been an appealing focus of research in the reconstruction of Lower Paleolithic survival strategies, at the expenses of the small flake tools considered by-products of the stone production process rather than desired end products. Here, we use use-wear, residues and technological analyses to show direct and very early evidence of the deliberate production and use of small flakes for targeted stages of the prey butchery process at the late Lower Paleolithic Acheulian site of Revadim, Israel. We highlight the significant role of small flakes in Lower Paleolithic adaptation alongside the canonical large handaxes. Our results demonstrate the technological and cognitive flexibility of early human groups in the Levant and beyond at the threshold of the departure from Lower Paleolithic lifeways.