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188 Research products, page 1 of 19

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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Research data . Film . 2011
    English
    Authors: 
    Farr, Lucy;
    Publisher: The Incremental project (Cambridge University Library)
    Country: United Kingdom

    Glenn Jobson (CRASSH) produced and edited this video in collaboration with the Incremental project. ESRI's ArcGIS data, and other vector data system, are highly vulnerable to partial or complete data loss over time because as the company makes frequent software updates, and the data themselves have so many moving parts. In this presentation, Lucy Farr (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) describes her experiences using ArcGIS, lessons learnt, and recommendations for best practices to prevent data disaster and frustration. This work was produced by the Incremental project, which is supported by JISC through the Research Data Management Programme.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Macfarlane, Alan; Thomas, Keith; Burke, Peter; Phythian-Adams, Charles; Pitt-Rivers, Julian; Cohn, B. S. (Barney); Ranger, Terence; James, Mervyn; Guha, Ranajit; Bossy, John;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Only two hours out of the four hours of the film have been recovered by the British Film Institute. The films were made and edited by the Audio-Visual Aids Unit in Cambridge University, directed by Martin Gienke and assisted by Sarah Harrison. A seminar on the interpretation of public rituals by historians and anthropologists. This was the first of four seminars organized by Alan Macfarlane at King's College, Cambridge in 1976-7. The films of two remain, this and another on models of social change (also on the web). This session was held on 20 March 1976. The participants were: Keith Thomas (chairman), Peter Burke, Charles Phythian-Adams, Julian Pitt-Rivers, B.S. (Barney) Cohn, Terence Ranger, Mervyn James, Ranajit Guha and John Bossy. Social Science Research Council and the Research Centre, King's College, Cambridge

  • Research data . Film . 2010
    English
    Authors: 
    Thomas, Keith;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Interviewed on 5 September 2009 by Alan Macfarlane and edited by Sarah Harrison Interview of Sir Keith Thomas - on his life and work

  • English
    Authors: 
    BISCtv;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    Curatorial note from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: In this video, visiting fellow Chris Jones describes the Field School in Digital Humanities, offered in 2015, where students visited two medieval parish churches in Surrey containing historical objects that Jones was digitizing: a 1615 King James Bible and various medieval wall paintings. The field school’s aim was to investigate which digitizing technologies are appropriate for the artifacts. The video’s pedagogical use lies in its advocacy for site-specific research, or assessing historical artifacts in the sites they would have been originally experienced in order to understand their social and material significance. High-resolution digital photos, for instance, distort the original experience of viewing the wall paintings by candlelight and the censorship of the images during the medieval period. The video thus considers the adequacy of digital photography and videography as documentary tools, suggesting the need for contextualization through other media. It also demonstrates the need for site-specific sensitivity in digital fieldwork.

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    deWinter, Jennifer; Vie, Stephanie; Vie, Stephanie;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    In this video, Drs. Stephanie Vie and Jennifer deWinter explain some of the tools digital humanists can use for critical discourse analysis and visualization of data collected from social media platforms.

  • Russian
    Authors: 
    Terbish, Baasanjav;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    Mergen says that of all schools of Buddhism, Gelug was the most open to the masses. Whilst other schools, which were more closed, did not send out missionaries, Gelug pursued this line of activity. Despite being like this, Gelug also comprises of esotericism and secret tantric practices. The Oirats played an important role in the establishment of the Gelug tradition. Gushi Khan’s campaign, the creation of the Kokonor Khanate and the creation of a theocratic state in Tibet itself – these are all the contribution of the Oirats. The Oirats were also first among the Mongolian peoples to adopt Buddhism. In addition, the Kalmyks were instrumental in spreading Buddhism in modern Europe and the United States. There are many hypotheses about when Buddhism spread among the Oirats. Some scholars say that it was during Chingis Khan, others take it further back to the pre-Chingis period, and yet there are scholars who contend that Buddhism began to spread in the 17th century. At present, there are no historical sources to verify any of these theories. Before adopting Gelug, various Mongolian tribes practiced other Buddhist traditions. The question of why Mongolian tribes chose Gelug can be explained partly by the fact that Altan Khan of Mongolia had personal contact with the Dalai Lama III, head of the Gelug school. Born in the 15th century, Gelug spread among the Mongols in the 16th century. Why was Gelug so popular among the Oirats? In Mergen’s view, this school’s lavish ceremonies involving large numbers of monks might have attracted the Oirats. To this should be added Buddha’s prediction that his religion would spread to the north. There could be geographical factors as well added to this explanation. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Russian
    Authors: 
    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    Svetlana talks about her father, the famous Kalmyk artist Garya Rokchinskiy. In 1939 my father participated in a contest of Pushkin’s drawings which he won. The prize was a bicycle, which was so rare at that time that all the boys in the vicinity ran after him. This was also a time when Kalmyk autonomy was established, which was to be followed by exile and post-exile periods. After exile, when Kalmyk ASSR was restored, my father returned to Kalmykia. By 1961 my father was a member of the Union of Artists of the USSR, had done a solo exhibition in Alma-Ata and participated in exhibitions in Moscow. By that time he was already well known in Kazakhstan where he had graduated from an art school with honors. Because of his status as an exiled person, he was denied a diploma with distinction. During the war many art institutes in Moscow and St. Petersburg were relocated along with teaching staff to other parts of the USSR, including Kazakhstan. Many of my father’s professors, who were from Moscow and St Petersburg, acknowledged his talent. In Kazakhstan my father honed his skills. There he went on trips to the mountains. There he found his style, which is close to impressionism, with his extraordinary color vision and the ability to convey colors in strokes. When he said that he wanted to return to Kalmykia, in Kazakhstan they did not want to let him go. My father had a wish to see Kalmykia restored. There were many problems then as there are today with the Kalmyk language, which is the consequence of exile. In Kalmykia they had a task to create fine arts, and my father became the founder of modern Kalmyk art. He has a painting titled ‘Mother – my native land’, which he dedicated to his grandmother who lived 95 years and accepted Buddhist vows (she did not eat meat, didn’t lie, prayed). He did not invent anything, but depicted his grandmother as she was. In the painting she is an elderly Kalmyk woman with an uncovered head, walking, dressed in a Kalmyk dress, holds a rosary in her right hand. She emanates strength, will, but at the same time, femininity and signs of a hard life. She survived war and exile. There is also a lot of sunlight in the picture and a sense of harmony between a human being and nature. She represents an archaic vertical of the world tree. The axis of the world is found in this image. There are no representations of suffering in the picture, but simply an elderly Kalmyk woman walking through her native land. We see a figurative embodiment of one’s homeland in this painting. As an artist my father took a lot of inspiration from life. He even had his own vocabulary. One winter was exceptionally cold and as a result many animals died. He said: ‘Such a cold and frost, and the lambs are crying.’ He had a childlike worldview, he saw everything in his own way. My father lived in his own world, in which he felt, created and left his paintings. All of his paintings are devoted to his native land. Driven by his wish to find his identity, he always turned to Dzungaria topic. Before his departure, he used to say, ‘What will become of us?’ I was young then and did not understand what he was talking about, but now I have realized that he was talking about us, the Kalmyks. My father had a desire to restore what had been lost. He knew all Kalmyk traditions well, spoke the Kalmyk language, danced and sang. Once he brought from Ulan-Bator a tape recording of a contest of singers and storytellers of Altai who performed the praise to the Altai Mountain. When he listened to that recording of throat singing, he cried, he felt the power of the ancestral land and our tradition. In his painting of Zaya Pandita one can see the fate of the Kalmyks, a unique people, who had their own script, language, art, dances, costumes. For my father Zaya Pandita represented all these. There is Zaya Pandita’s image, cast in silver in Ulan Bator. My father came up with that image in which he combined two periods of our history - Oirat and Kalmyk. Another painting of my father depicts Eelyan Ovla, a Jangar singer. This picture was an event, according to Soviet art critics. In a state of inspiration and singing, Eelyan Ovla is depicted in the background of the country of Bumba. My father worked on this image for 10 years. The works of Rokchinskiy show his path from realism to abstractionism. There is also a lotus series, which is the result of his trip to the Astrakhan conservation area. By means of the lotus flower the artist engages in thinking about life itself. In the painting, in the foreground there is a white lotus, at the bottom is a lotus bud which is starting to unfold, in the background - a lotus box with seeds. This reflects the philosophy of Buddhism, including the beginning of life, flowering time and departure. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit);
    Publisher: CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit)
    Country: Spain

    [ES] En el Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit) desarrollamos proyectos de investigación interdisciplinar en Patrimonio Cultural, desde la perspectiva de diferentes especialidades y en distintos ámbitos geográficos. Con esta muestra de algunos de los proyectos realizados a lo largo del año 2016 queremos felicitar la Navidad y desear un mejor año 2017. [EN] At the Institute of Heritage Sciences (Incipit) we develop interdisciplinary research projects on Cultural Heritage, from a perspective of different specialities and in different geographical areas. With this display of some of the projects carried out during 2016 we want to congratulate Christmas and wish for a better 2017. Se incluyen dos versiones del vídeo, una en castellano y otra en inglés. -- There are included two versions of the video, one in Spanish and another in English.-- More information about research by INCIPIT can be found at its web site http://www.incipit.csic.es/es/Default.aspx Peer reviewed

  • Research data . Film . 2008
    Authors: 
    Macfarlane;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Interview of Alan Macfarlane by Clarinda Still in February 2008, in his room in King's College. This was an experimental interview, the first of a number of interviews for the DART project at the Londond School of Economics

  • English
    Authors: 
    Smith, Pamela;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Three parts of the panel, organized by Pamela Jane Smith and edited by Silas Michalakas, filmed on 22 October 2007 in Cambridge A panel in Cambridge on 'Personal Histories in Archaeological Theory and Method' chaired by Dr. Kate Pretty

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
188 Research products, page 1 of 19
  • Research data . Film . 2011
    English
    Authors: 
    Farr, Lucy;
    Publisher: The Incremental project (Cambridge University Library)
    Country: United Kingdom

    Glenn Jobson (CRASSH) produced and edited this video in collaboration with the Incremental project. ESRI's ArcGIS data, and other vector data system, are highly vulnerable to partial or complete data loss over time because as the company makes frequent software updates, and the data themselves have so many moving parts. In this presentation, Lucy Farr (McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research) describes her experiences using ArcGIS, lessons learnt, and recommendations for best practices to prevent data disaster and frustration. This work was produced by the Incremental project, which is supported by JISC through the Research Data Management Programme.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Macfarlane, Alan; Thomas, Keith; Burke, Peter; Phythian-Adams, Charles; Pitt-Rivers, Julian; Cohn, B. S. (Barney); Ranger, Terence; James, Mervyn; Guha, Ranajit; Bossy, John;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Only two hours out of the four hours of the film have been recovered by the British Film Institute. The films were made and edited by the Audio-Visual Aids Unit in Cambridge University, directed by Martin Gienke and assisted by Sarah Harrison. A seminar on the interpretation of public rituals by historians and anthropologists. This was the first of four seminars organized by Alan Macfarlane at King's College, Cambridge in 1976-7. The films of two remain, this and another on models of social change (also on the web). This session was held on 20 March 1976. The participants were: Keith Thomas (chairman), Peter Burke, Charles Phythian-Adams, Julian Pitt-Rivers, B.S. (Barney) Cohn, Terence Ranger, Mervyn James, Ranajit Guha and John Bossy. Social Science Research Council and the Research Centre, King's College, Cambridge

  • Research data . Film . 2010
    English
    Authors: 
    Thomas, Keith;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Interviewed on 5 September 2009 by Alan Macfarlane and edited by Sarah Harrison Interview of Sir Keith Thomas - on his life and work

  • English
    Authors: 
    BISCtv;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    Curatorial note from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: In this video, visiting fellow Chris Jones describes the Field School in Digital Humanities, offered in 2015, where students visited two medieval parish churches in Surrey containing historical objects that Jones was digitizing: a 1615 King James Bible and various medieval wall paintings. The field school’s aim was to investigate which digitizing technologies are appropriate for the artifacts. The video’s pedagogical use lies in its advocacy for site-specific research, or assessing historical artifacts in the sites they would have been originally experienced in order to understand their social and material significance. High-resolution digital photos, for instance, distort the original experience of viewing the wall paintings by candlelight and the censorship of the images during the medieval period. The video thus considers the adequacy of digital photography and videography as documentary tools, suggesting the need for contextualization through other media. It also demonstrates the need for site-specific sensitivity in digital fieldwork.

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    English
    Authors: 
    deWinter, Jennifer; Vie, Stephanie; Vie, Stephanie;
    Publisher: Humanities Commons

    In this video, Drs. Stephanie Vie and Jennifer deWinter explain some of the tools digital humanists can use for critical discourse analysis and visualization of data collected from social media platforms.

  • Russian
    Authors: 
    Terbish, Baasanjav;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    Mergen says that of all schools of Buddhism, Gelug was the most open to the masses. Whilst other schools, which were more closed, did not send out missionaries, Gelug pursued this line of activity. Despite being like this, Gelug also comprises of esotericism and secret tantric practices. The Oirats played an important role in the establishment of the Gelug tradition. Gushi Khan’s campaign, the creation of the Kokonor Khanate and the creation of a theocratic state in Tibet itself – these are all the contribution of the Oirats. The Oirats were also first among the Mongolian peoples to adopt Buddhism. In addition, the Kalmyks were instrumental in spreading Buddhism in modern Europe and the United States. There are many hypotheses about when Buddhism spread among the Oirats. Some scholars say that it was during Chingis Khan, others take it further back to the pre-Chingis period, and yet there are scholars who contend that Buddhism began to spread in the 17th century. At present, there are no historical sources to verify any of these theories. Before adopting Gelug, various Mongolian tribes practiced other Buddhist traditions. The question of why Mongolian tribes chose Gelug can be explained partly by the fact that Altan Khan of Mongolia had personal contact with the Dalai Lama III, head of the Gelug school. Born in the 15th century, Gelug spread among the Mongols in the 16th century. Why was Gelug so popular among the Oirats? In Mergen’s view, this school’s lavish ceremonies involving large numbers of monks might have attracted the Oirats. To this should be added Buddha’s prediction that his religion would spread to the north. There could be geographical factors as well added to this explanation. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Russian
    Authors: 
    Terbish, Baasanjav; Churyumova, Elvira;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    Svetlana talks about her father, the famous Kalmyk artist Garya Rokchinskiy. In 1939 my father participated in a contest of Pushkin’s drawings which he won. The prize was a bicycle, which was so rare at that time that all the boys in the vicinity ran after him. This was also a time when Kalmyk autonomy was established, which was to be followed by exile and post-exile periods. After exile, when Kalmyk ASSR was restored, my father returned to Kalmykia. By 1961 my father was a member of the Union of Artists of the USSR, had done a solo exhibition in Alma-Ata and participated in exhibitions in Moscow. By that time he was already well known in Kazakhstan where he had graduated from an art school with honors. Because of his status as an exiled person, he was denied a diploma with distinction. During the war many art institutes in Moscow and St. Petersburg were relocated along with teaching staff to other parts of the USSR, including Kazakhstan. Many of my father’s professors, who were from Moscow and St Petersburg, acknowledged his talent. In Kazakhstan my father honed his skills. There he went on trips to the mountains. There he found his style, which is close to impressionism, with his extraordinary color vision and the ability to convey colors in strokes. When he said that he wanted to return to Kalmykia, in Kazakhstan they did not want to let him go. My father had a wish to see Kalmykia restored. There were many problems then as there are today with the Kalmyk language, which is the consequence of exile. In Kalmykia they had a task to create fine arts, and my father became the founder of modern Kalmyk art. He has a painting titled ‘Mother – my native land’, which he dedicated to his grandmother who lived 95 years and accepted Buddhist vows (she did not eat meat, didn’t lie, prayed). He did not invent anything, but depicted his grandmother as she was. In the painting she is an elderly Kalmyk woman with an uncovered head, walking, dressed in a Kalmyk dress, holds a rosary in her right hand. She emanates strength, will, but at the same time, femininity and signs of a hard life. She survived war and exile. There is also a lot of sunlight in the picture and a sense of harmony between a human being and nature. She represents an archaic vertical of the world tree. The axis of the world is found in this image. There are no representations of suffering in the picture, but simply an elderly Kalmyk woman walking through her native land. We see a figurative embodiment of one’s homeland in this painting. As an artist my father took a lot of inspiration from life. He even had his own vocabulary. One winter was exceptionally cold and as a result many animals died. He said: ‘Such a cold and frost, and the lambs are crying.’ He had a childlike worldview, he saw everything in his own way. My father lived in his own world, in which he felt, created and left his paintings. All of his paintings are devoted to his native land. Driven by his wish to find his identity, he always turned to Dzungaria topic. Before his departure, he used to say, ‘What will become of us?’ I was young then and did not understand what he was talking about, but now I have realized that he was talking about us, the Kalmyks. My father had a desire to restore what had been lost. He knew all Kalmyk traditions well, spoke the Kalmyk language, danced and sang. Once he brought from Ulan-Bator a tape recording of a contest of singers and storytellers of Altai who performed the praise to the Altai Mountain. When he listened to that recording of throat singing, he cried, he felt the power of the ancestral land and our tradition. In his painting of Zaya Pandita one can see the fate of the Kalmyks, a unique people, who had their own script, language, art, dances, costumes. For my father Zaya Pandita represented all these. There is Zaya Pandita’s image, cast in silver in Ulan Bator. My father came up with that image in which he combined two periods of our history - Oirat and Kalmyk. Another painting of my father depicts Eelyan Ovla, a Jangar singer. This picture was an event, according to Soviet art critics. In a state of inspiration and singing, Eelyan Ovla is depicted in the background of the country of Bumba. My father worked on this image for 10 years. The works of Rokchinskiy show his path from realism to abstractionism. There is also a lotus series, which is the result of his trip to the Astrakhan conservation area. By means of the lotus flower the artist engages in thinking about life itself. In the painting, in the foreground there is a white lotus, at the bottom is a lotus bud which is starting to unfold, in the background - a lotus box with seeds. This reflects the philosophy of Buddhism, including the beginning of life, flowering time and departure. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit);
    Publisher: CSIC - Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit)
    Country: Spain

    [ES] En el Instituto de Ciencias del Patrimonio (Incipit) desarrollamos proyectos de investigación interdisciplinar en Patrimonio Cultural, desde la perspectiva de diferentes especialidades y en distintos ámbitos geográficos. Con esta muestra de algunos de los proyectos realizados a lo largo del año 2016 queremos felicitar la Navidad y desear un mejor año 2017. [EN] At the Institute of Heritage Sciences (Incipit) we develop interdisciplinary research projects on Cultural Heritage, from a perspective of different specialities and in different geographical areas. With this display of some of the projects carried out during 2016 we want to congratulate Christmas and wish for a better 2017. Se incluyen dos versiones del vídeo, una en castellano y otra en inglés. -- There are included two versions of the video, one in Spanish and another in English.-- More information about research by INCIPIT can be found at its web site http://www.incipit.csic.es/es/Default.aspx Peer reviewed

  • Research data . Film . 2008
    Authors: 
    Macfarlane;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Interview of Alan Macfarlane by Clarinda Still in February 2008, in his room in King's College. This was an experimental interview, the first of a number of interviews for the DART project at the Londond School of Economics

  • English
    Authors: 
    Smith, Pamela;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Three parts of the panel, organized by Pamela Jane Smith and edited by Silas Michalakas, filmed on 22 October 2007 in Cambridge A panel in Cambridge on 'Personal Histories in Archaeological Theory and Method' chaired by Dr. Kate Pretty