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33 Research products, page 3 of 4

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • Open Access
  • DK
  • Roskilde Universitetscenter's Digitale Arkiv
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Augoustakis, Louisa Dikea; Hiltunen, Eija Anneli; Kurzmann, Marlene; Kühn, Lena;
    Country: Denmark

    This project deals with the perception of the exhibition Riverbed by Olafur Eliasson. We aim to find out, how the exhibition was encoded by the artist and decoded by students. In order to examine this topic, a focus group discussion has been conducted and a “quick and dirty” survey at Louisiana served as a supplement to get a deeper insight. The theoretical frame is given by Stuart Hall’s four step model of encoding and decoding. In order to examine the production stage of Riverbed, a monological interview with Eliasson was taken into account. The main finding of this research is that meaning-making of an abstract artwork as Riverbed cannot be regarded as a linear transmission process from sender to receiver, but must be approached in much more flexible and complex terms.

  • Other research product . 2014
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Skov, Cecilie; Andersen, Simone Maja; Mortensen, Annagrethe Heuser; Haugaard, Oscar; Lindhardtsen, Jesper Krogh; Torndal, Stefanie; Hallas, Kenneth; Glemø, Nikolaj Hattens;
    Country: Denmark

    The project seeks to answer a number of questions, concerning the Danish Viking re-enactment community. The members of the Danish Viking re-enactment community seek to re-enact, interpret and experience the Viking age. The re-enactors use the insight they acquire through books, archaeological relics and their own reflections to create historical ‘accurate’ recreations of settlements, markets and battlefields. Each of these recreations depict vastly different aspects of the real Viking community, which is most notorious for its (in) famous raids. The raids abroad are among such subjects, which the re-enactors do not wish to re-enact. They do, however wish to re-enact essential parts of the everyday life as they imagine it could have been, including, artisanship, trading and combat. These three re-acted professions divide the re-enactment community respectively. The concept Authenticity, defined as both the historical accuracy and the individual experience of interconnection between the “constructed world” and the “real world”, plays a crucial role in re-enactment. In order to achieve both of these distinctive definitions, re-enactors go to great lengths to ensure their equipment and ‘roles’ are accounted for historically, in order to not only show historical accuracy, but to create the proper environment in which the re-enactors can experience moments of aforementioned interconnection between past and present. Members of Danish Viking re-enactment community form identities due to their involvement with the Viking age. A select few have converted to the old Scandinavian Asa-belief in order to narrow the gap between modern age and the Viking age. Through the re-enactors engagement with traditions and customs of the Viking age, three different layers of identity are affected; individual identities, collective identities in the groups and Danish national identity. History is in re-enactment interpreted, not as distant events disconnected from the present due to their distance in time, but as tangible narratives, connectable to the present through studies, involvement and reflectivity.

  • Other research product . 2014
    Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Christiansen, Janni Jul; Seltoft, Stine; Blauenfeldt, Lea Vyff; Kjær, Christoffer Schyth; Hedegaard, Jens Wendelboe; Frantsen, Mathias Borre; Hansen, Andreas Holm; Reith-Hauberg, Søren;
    Country: Denmark

    This study examines the term ’nature’ and its relation to humans. In an attempt to derive a certain understanding of the complexity of the word, the examination will build on Danish philosopher Hans Fink’s description of modern western culture’s view on nature. To achieve a better understanding of this modern view, the focus of the study lies on a historical examination and analysis of selected works by prominent philosophers, from ancient Greek times to modern ages. These analyses of these periods conclude an undeniable influence on modern day perception of nature. The study assumes that today’s human relation to nature have certain issues regarding vast distancing and exploitation. By this assumption it is this study’s purpose to question whether it is possible to change or renew this relationship in order to obtain a better and more sustainable way of coexisting with nature.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dahler-Larsen, Toke; Bøgelund, Ulrik André;
    Country: Denmark

    In this project, we discuss the phenomenon of UAV warfare. By conducting a discourse analysis of two speeches, one conducted by then counterterrorism advisor John Brennan and one by President Barack Obama, we investigate how UAV use is justified. We briefly discuss the historical background and contemporary public opinion in order to contextualize the discourse presented in the two speeches. The discourse analysis is structured in three analytical categories: how are representations of identity are articulated, how the speakers make claims about the future and finally the specific nature of the justifications of UAV use. Finally, we discuss how our empirical findings relate to the discussion of the changing nature of warfare, as well as we present a brief critique of a position in the current UAV debate. Our main argument in this discussion is that UAVs should be discussed within the social, discursive practice they are used, and not regarded merely as technological objects distinct from the context they exist in.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aharon, Roee; Christensen, Emanuella; Frid-Nielsen, Snorre; Husen, Betina;
    Country: Denmark

    Paradoxically, despite its reputation as a “green” leader, Denmark has the highest levels of waste and incineration per capita, as well as low levels of household recycling. Incineration ranks low on EU and Danish waste strategies, due to its negative environmental impact. While much social science research on waste management focuses on behavioral change at the individual level, this study explores how urban Danish household recycling habits and waste management, with an inclination towards incineration, are shaped by social, political and historical structures. Using a reflexive hybrid constructivist-structuralism epistemology, inspired by Bourdieu’s Logic of Practice, Schnaiberg’s Treadmill of Production and Hannigan’s Claims-making Process, the research project utilized an inductive qualitative approach. A three-pronged research design included: an exploration of the current household recycling practices using research diaries and secondary data, a historical inquiry into notable shifts in waste management related to incineration since 1850, and a case study of ARC/Amagerforbrænding, a Danish incineration facility. The study found that, due to a complex interweaving of the investigated structures, incineration was favored over recycling within the institution of waste management, with the exception of times when risk has felt sufficiently “real” by Danish citizens. This occurred through the political claims-making process, where the public collectively misrecognized that the economic benefits of incineration is the driving mechanism and underlying factor behind waste management decisions in Denmark, rather than ambitions to meet environmental goals.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Petersen, Freja Astrid;
    Country: Denmark

    Abstract This project is about the Viking Age in Scandinavia and its relation to English history. During the project I attempt to define some of the main factors that the Viking Culture affected in early English society, and to what extent this impact had on the future of England. One of the most prevalent relations between these two cultures is the trade going on between them, and how this shaped new power relations, and thus also changed the development of English, and Scandinavian culture. Although the nation with which England at this time had most interaction was the newly formed Denmark, the definition of Viking Culture is made of the entire Scandinavian Viking culture, since this was more or less one culture at that time.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bjerre, Andreas; Ching, Rune; Poulsen, Kelly; Holmen, Ida;
    Country: Denmark

    This project deals with addressing low interest in history outside of school, for the target group, male and female students from age 15 to 20. We created the campaign Daily Dose of History, which contains a print media element that leads to an (unmade) website and App. The aim of Daily Dose of History, is to provide the target group with easily digestible historical facts. The project at hand, has two principal aspects 1) testing assumptions regarding low interest in history and 2) getting actual feedback on the printed media product (posters). To analyze and expand on the feedback collected from focus group interviews, we chose the apply theories from Windahl, Rogers and Schrøder. This analysis has generated a greater understanding of our target group and their perception of the product.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ølgaard, Daniel Møller; Gill, Tina Sundree Lauge;
    Country: Denmark

    This project sets out to investigate the role of security in the Chinese Western Development Plan (WDP) and its application in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, along with the consequences of this for the Uyghur community. The analysis of this project begins by unraveling the historical role of security and the central components in the Sino-Xinjiang relation. Combined, these form the context from which the WDP was formulated and implemented in Xinjiang. Through an analysis of the rhetoric of the WDP we establish that the role of security accords with that of a non-traditional security agenda, as opposed to the previously dominant traditional-military security agenda in Sino-Xinjiang relations. However, this change in the role of security remains rhetoric, as the traditional-military security agenda that re-emerges with the formation of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation and the Global War on Terror not only co-exists with but gains prominence over the non-traditional security agenda of the WDP. As a consequence, the Uyghur population of Xinjiang continues to be sidelined by the Chinese government, despite the promise of the WDP.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Wiendel Rasmussen, Andreas; Meyer-Juhlin, Andreas; Ryttergaard, Emil;
    Country: Denmark

    In this project we have sought to explore how the National Museum's special exhibition Europe meets the World produces and disseminates the history of Europe and how the exhibition contributes to the discussion of a common European identity. As a basis for our theoretical understanding, we have availed ourselves of theories concerning identity and collective memory, narrative, the viewer's relationship to the exhibition and a conceptualization of the museum's presentation forms by virtue of museum theory and practice. We then compare the exhibition's various presentation forms and methods of the exhibition Kulturkontakte - Leben in Europe, which is a permanent exhibition at the Museum Europäischer Culture in Dahlem, Germany. Through these different perspectives about museums produce the form of European history; we can conclude that there exists a weighted relationship between the degree of the museum's narrative-related discourse and the viewer's interpretative framework. Through the National Museum's master narrative-related articulation is the space of negotiation that would have to be established between viewer and display impaired. In connection with the exhibition's contribution to the debate on a common European identity, it can be concluded that the identity is subject to the condition of a common understanding of the museum's historical production, which thus expresses itself in a collective memory. By virtue of the National Museum production, the contribution to the debate based on whether the chosen form rightly includes and relates to people living in modern and contemporary Europe.

  • Open Access Danish
    Authors: 
    Andersen, Mette Specht; Berthelsen, Jonas Juul; Philipsen, Emil; Præstegaard, Mads Christian;
    Country: Denmark

    This projects subject is the development of the secular rule through the secular clergy in the high middle ages with a focus on England. Our interest is what part the educated secular clergy played in the change from a vassal rule to a bureaucratic rule. To this we use the 4. Lateran Council canons to show the direct link to the Roman-Catholic Church, and how the Gregorian Reforms was a part of creating a professional clergy within the church. Combining this with The Dialogue Concerning the Exchequer as well as a wide variety of historians on the subject we wish to show what was the mind of the secular clergy and how he influenced the change in rule of man. On this we conclude the fol-lowing: The clergy was an significant part in the process which kept the secular power centralized and paved the way for the formation of the state.