Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
84 Research products, page 1 of 9

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Publications
  • Article
  • SE
  • Publikationer från KTH

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Sweden

    This article discusses David Lowenthal's last book, Quest for the Unity of Knowledge, which was published posthumously by Routledge in 2019 (available in print from November 2018). The book is based on a series of lectures that he gave while a visiting fellow with the KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s Environmental Humanities Laboratory in Stockholm in 2012. Aimed at a general academic audience, it is an erudite and passionate overview showing how ingrained bias towards unity or diversity shapes major issues in education, religion, genetics, race relations, heritage governance, and environmental policy. Quest for the Unity of Knowledge explores the Two Cultures debate, initiated by C.P. Snow, concerning the gulf between the sciences and the humanities. It covers areas such as conservation, ecology, history of ideas, museology, landscape, and heritage studies, aligning with Lowenthal's career-long research interests, and serving as well as a meta-comment to the emerging Environmental Humanities. QC 20220412

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker; Paglia, Eric;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20220317

  • Open Access Norwegian
    Authors: 
    Benner, Mats; Sörlin, Sverker;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20220318

  • Open Access Swedish
    Authors: 
    Bertilsson, Fredrik;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    Biopolitical preparedness: The impact of the behavioralscience research of the Swedish National Defense ResearchEstablishment (FOA) on Swedish crisis preparedness During the post-war period, major research investments were made to improvemilitary and defense capabilities both in Sweden and abroad. Muchremains undone as to exploring the impact of the Swedish National DefenseResearch Establishment (FOA) on Swedish state and society. Historians haveprimarily explored the development and impact of technological and naturalscience research and its connections with e.g. the military industry. Thisarticle provides new insights into the societal and political significance ofSwedish defense research by studying the human sciences at FOA. At thesame time, new insights are gained on the knowledge provision in Swedishpreparedness efforts. The aim of the article is to provide new knowledgeabout the influence of Swedish defense research on the Swedish civil defenseand crisis preparedness in the late 20th century. The purpose of the article isto explore the significance of behavioral science research at the Departmentof Human Sciences (FOA 5) in relation to a process at the end of the ColdWar in which crisis and preparedness were framed as problems pertainingto population behavior and risk awareness. The analysis is inspired bythe theory and research on biopolitics, originating in the works of MichelFoucault. I examine the influence of FOA’s behavioral science research inrelation to what I call “biopolitical preparedness,” which refers to an assemblageof research or knowledge about human life, health and behavior, andpolitical governance. Empirically, the article explores Swedish governmentalcommissions (statens offentliga utredningar) and FOA reports. QC 20220316 Humanities Knowledge in Swedish Defense Research: Human Sciences at FOA 5

  • Open Access Russian
    Authors: 
    Arzyutov, Dmitry V.; Anderson, David G.;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    What does an anthropologist’s archive look like? Where is it located? And is the anthropology of archives important for the understanding of anthropological thinking today? Here we answer these questions by analysing the various life histories of the archival fragments of one of the most puzzling and influential anthropologists in the history of Russian and Soviet anthropology: Sergei Mikhailovich Shirokogoroff (1887–1939). Shirokogoroff is credited as being one of the authors of the etnos theory — one of the main instruments of identity politics in Russia, China, Germany and also, in part, Japan and South Africa. The transnational life histories of Shirokogoroff and his wife Elizaveta [Elizabeth] Nikolaevna (1884–1943), and of their ideas, suggests a conception of the archive not as a single whole, but instead as a collection of forgotten, hidden, obliterated, or, on the other hand, scrupulously preserved fragments. These fragments are not centred in one place or organized around any one reading, but they nevertheless represent “partial connections”. Moreover, as we can see today with hindsight, none of these archival fragments lay inert. They have been intertwined in local political and social ontologies. Our text has an autoethnograpic quality. While illustrating separate episodes from the life of the Shirokogoroffs we also will tell of our search for the manuscripts through which we were forced onto strange paths and encounters. These greatly deepened our understanding both of the life of documents and their material links to the lives of researchers. Our article is an attempt to illustrate this complex picture which, in the end, will allow us to conclude that we have only just begun to understand the workings of the anthropologist’s archive in the history of anthropological thought. QC 20220530

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Daniel Svensson; Sverker Sörlin; Katarina Saltzman;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    Can walking trails be understood not only as routes to history and heritage, but also as heritage in and of themselves? The paper explores the articulation of trails as a distinct landscape and mobility heritage, bridging the nature-culture divide and building on physical and intellectual movements over time. The authors aim to contribute to a better understanding of the geography of trails and trailscapes by analysing the emergence of the Swedish-Norwegian trail Finnskogleden. The trail is situated in the border region spanning the former county of Hedmark in present-day Innlandet County, south-eastern Norway, and Värmland County in mid-western Sweden, a forested area where Finnish-speaking immigrants settled from the 16th century to the early 20th century. Archives, literature, interviews, and field visits were used to analyse the emergence and governance of the trail. The main finding is the importance of continuous articulation work by local and regional stakeholders, through texts, maps, maintenance, and mobility. In conclusion, the Finn forest trailscape and its mobility heritage can be seen as an articulation of territory over time, a multilayered process drawing on various environing technologies, making the trail a transformative part of a trans-border political geography. Rörelsearvet: stigar och leder i hållbar och inkluderande kulturarvsförvaltning

  • Publication . Conference object . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alkathiri, Abdul Aziz; Giaretta, Lodovico; Girdzijauskas, Sarunas; Sahlgren, Magnus;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Sweden
    Project: EC | RAIS (813162), EC | RAIS (813162)

    Advanced NLP models require huge amounts of data from various domains to produce high-quality representations. It is useful then for a few large public and private organizations to join their corpora during training. However, factors such as legislation and user emphasis on data privacy may prevent centralized orchestration and data sharing among these organizations. Therefore, for this specific scenario, we investigate how gossip learning, a massively-parallel, data-private, decentralized protocol, compares to a shared-dataset solution. We find that the application of Word2Vec in a gossip learning framework is viable. Without any tuning, the results are comparable to a traditional centralized setting, with a reduction in ground-truth similarity scores as low as 4.3%. Furthermore, the results are up to 54.8% better than independent local training. QC 20210423

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chen Feng; John Peponis;
    Publisher: KTH, Arkitektur
    Country: Sweden

    The patterns of syntactic differentiation and their causes and effects are fundamental to space syntax analysis. Often, however, differentiation is taken for granted with no reference to the dynamic process that brings it about. Here, we first show that by measuring the amount of syntactic differentiation, we can better distinguish between types of street networks. We then show that repeated local transformations of a regular street grid lead to different yet largely predictable trajectories of differentiation depending upon the rules used. Finally, we show that different paths to differentiation entail different costs in terms of undesirable properties. This allows us to better assess the likely consequences of design moves and their appropriateness relative to design intentions. QC 20210614

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Country: Sweden
    Project: EC | SPHERE (787516)

    AbstractEmerging after World War II “the environment” as a modern concept turned in the years around 1970 into a phase of institutionalization in science, civic society, and politics. Part of this was the foundation of journals. The majority became “environmental specialist journals”, typically based in established disciplines. Some became “environmental generalist journals”, covering broad knowledge areas and often with an ambition to be policy relevant. A significant and early member of the latter category was Ambio, founded 1972. This article presents an overview of the journal’s first 50 years, with a focus on main changes in scientific content, political context, and editorial directions. A key finding is that the journal reflects an increasing pluralization of “the environment” with concepts such as global change, climate change, Earth system science, Anthropocene, resilience, and environmental governance. Another finding is that the journal has also itself influenced developments through publishing work on new concepts and ideas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lina Rahm;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    Based on empirical material from Swedish reformist labour movement associations, this article illustrates how digital technology has been described as a problem (and sometimes a solution) at different points in time. Most significant, for this article, is the role that non-formal adult education has played in solving these problems. Computer education has repeatedly been described as a measure not only to increase technical knowledge, but also to construe desirable (digital) citizens for the future. Problematisations of the digital have changed over time, and these discursive reconceptualisations can be described as existing on a spectrum between techno-utopian visions, where adaptation of the human is seen as a task for education, and techno-dystopian forecasts, where education is needed to mobilise democratic control over threatening machines. As such, the goal for education has been one of political control—either to adapt people to machines, or to adapt machines to people. QC 20220210