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435 Research products, page 1 of 44

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • CA

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dong, Ximing;
    Country: Canada

    Bi-directional Encoder Representations from Transformers (BERT) is the state-of-the-art deep learning model for pre-training natural language processing (NLP) tasks such as sentiment analysis. The BERT model dynamically generates word representations according to the context and semantics using its bi-directional and attention mechanism features. The model, although, improves precision on NLP tasks, is compute-intensive and time-consuming to deploy on mobile or smaller platforms. In this thesis, to address this issue, we use knowledge distillation (KD), a "teacher-student" training technique, to compress the model. We use the BERT model as the "teacher" model to transfer knowledge to student models, ``first-generation'' convolution neural networks, and long-short term memory with attention mechanism (LSTM-atten). We conduct various experiments on sentiment analysis benchmark data sets and show that the “student models” through knowledge distillation have better performance with 70% improvement in accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score compared to models without KD. We also investigate the convergence rate of student models and compare the results to the existing models in the literature. Finally, we show that compared to the full-size BERT model, our RNN series models are 50 times smaller in size and retain approximately 96% performance on benchmark data sets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Valles Duran, Magnolia;
    Country: Canada

    For centuries, Spanish midwives provided essential care to the women in their communities. They were counsellors, wet nurses, and herbalists, as well as, aiding during labor and delivery. However, due to the professionalisation of medicine and the creation of new regulatory bodies, their position within the medical field changed. While midwives were often not allowed to be part of these regulatory bodies, such as the Protomedicato, university-educated physicians used these institutions to assert their dominance over the medical field. Thus, through various marginalisation practices against midwives, university-educated physicians attempted to undermine and limit their role within the newly established medical order. This thesis will explore the different marginalisation practices that these new institutions imposed on midwives, their effects on the trade of midwifery, and how the status of midwives and physicians evolved due to these changes.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sommerfeldt, James;
    Country: Canada

    This research utilizes a twofold approach: the general framework of archaeogaming; and the theoretical position of affective history. Using the video game Assassin’s Creed Odyssey as a case study, this research paper provides a critique of the current literature as it relates to the topics of archaeogaming and affective history. Documented archaeological findings of Olympia are examined in known literature, as well as in the designed environment of the video game. The study provides further understanding of how archaeogaming is defined as the “archaeology both in and of digital games” (Reinhard 2) and how the application of affective history theory, the study of the past with emotional and human experience through re-enactment, holds the potential to open new avenues of study in classical archaeology. This research demonstrates how video games and classical archaeology merge together, providing an alternative form of study that can be applied to classical studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reyes Ayala, Brenda; Du, Qiufeng; Han, Juyi;
    Country: Canada

    Presented at the Linked Archives 2022: International Workshop on Archives and Linked Data at the 26th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL2022), Padua, Italy.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jordaan, Jacqueline;
    Country: Canada

    Museums are sites of representation and contestation; especially in South Africa, where the representation of African peoples’ pasts are often found in Eurocentric oriented museums. Museums, as retainers of material culture could present alternative understandings of African peoples’ pasts, one not subject to a Eurocentric valorisation of the written word as the blueprint of development and complexity. To this point, the practice of archaeology and its potential contribution to public understandings of African peoples’ pasts become critical to African centring. Framed within a larger discussion of coloniality, I use qualitative methods to assess museum display themes across KwaZulu-Natal, colonial and apartheid narratives and reframing opportunities at the KwaZulu-Natal Museum, and the museum as a teaching resource. In this dissertation, I discuss de-linking strategies, such as the use of orality and museum educator orientation, which hold potential to create a humanism that expands African peoples’ contributions to the stories of humanity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jensby, Matthew;
    Country: Canada

    Teeth are commonly excavated items among archaeological assemblages and provide key insights to the individual from which they develop. Specifically, dental enamel registers evidence of biorhythmic growth (and disruption) within the tooth crown morphology as enamel is deposited. The present research investigates evidence of systemic growth disruption among the molars of archaeological barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) excavated from the LdFa-1 site in southern Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. This study is the first to examine Rangifer crowns from the inside-out, exploring both the internal composition of enamel and surface morphology. With minimal prior data available, the overall focus of this project is to begin establishing locational patterns and frequencies of developmental disruption observed among each molar type (M1-3). Examining growth disruption at the enamel surface is accomplished by generating a profile of each tooth using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and assessed with two recently developed overlay techniques (a 6th order polynomial trendline and a spline curve) (Cares Henriquez and Oxenham 2020; Gamble and Milne 2018). Histological thin sections are then created and observed under polarized light to identify evidence of developmental disruption among the internal enamel matrices. A disruption event is represented by a dark line (accentuated stria of Retzius) where enamel secretion experienced abnormal pause. This study finds the spline curve to be a better fit for analyzing surface profiles via LSCM compared to 6th order polynomial, but the technique produces inaccurate evidence of enamel growth disruption. However, of 39 accentuated striae of Retzius terminating at the outer enamel surface, 23 could be associated with surface defects. This suggests that an LSCM spline curve may be a useful analytical tool for future research, but should only be applied as a supplemental approach to a more established method of identifying enamel growth defects (such as scoring accentuated striae of Retzius). This study incorporates such an approach to the present data, producing initial locational frequencies of surficial developmental disruption (referred to as linear enamel hypoplasia, or LEH) among Rangifer teeth. These trends are then interpreted based on general, yet highly synchronic caribou life-history patterns with potential to result in growth disruption.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cook, Matthew;
    Country: Canada

    Language is not only a tool for communication, but a window into human nature and the mind. The way we talk about ourselves, others, and the world around us reveals our personalities, mental health, self- and group-serving biases, and more. Though many sources of language exist to understand human psychology, newspapers provide a unique opportunity for studying changes in attitudes, values, and beliefs. In this thesis, I analyzed 221 years (1789-2009) of American historical newspaper data from two historical newspaper corpora (Chronicling America and the Corpus of Historical America English [COHA]). The volume of data is more than could ever be read by any scholar or group of scholars. Therefore, I made use of a standard computational language model of distributed semantics called the Random Permutation (RP) model that “reads” through a corpus of text and generates a mathematical representation of word meaning (i.e., a vector representation). I used the RP model to generate a vector representation for each word written in each decade of the newspapers. The result of this procedure is a 3000-dimensional vector space where each word in each decade is represented as a point in a space that evolves through time. Similar words (e.g., dog and canine) occupy similar regions in the semantic vector space, whereas dissimilar words (e.g., dog and toolbox) occupy dissimilar regions in the semantic space. Having derived dozens of sets of vectors, I first conducted a series of four experiments using unambiguous ground truths to validate the semantic meaning embedding within the vector space. After validating the vectors, I used several methods, including machine learning methods, to measure long term changes in attitudes, values, and beliefs through an analysis of language. In addition to the computational work, I conducted an empirical experiment that demonstrated that the methods I used to measure meaning also predict peoples’ behavioural bias in real-world consequential decisions (i.e., job hiring). The ultimate goal of the thesis is to advance computational methods for accurately predicting people’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviour from language.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thompson, Eleanor Glenne;
    Country: Canada

    In the second decade of the twentieth century, the resistance of Canadian prairie farm women to the inequities of the Dominion government’s national policies, coupled with their growing awareness of women’s unequal rights, gave rise to the formation of semi-autonomous farm women’s organizations in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. These women were part of the agrarian protest movement that has left its mark on the political, economic and social structures of Canada. Considerable research has shed light on the organized farm women of Saskatchewan and Alberta, but little has been written about the United Farm Women of Manitoba (UFWM). Drawing on the extensive files of the UFWM preserved in the Archives of Manitoba as well as relevant secondary sources, this thesis situates members of the UFWM in the context of settler colonialism and utilizes the intersectional analyses of gender, class, race, religion, ethnicity and region to examine these women’s lives and work, both on the farm and in the public sphere, between 1916 and 1936. The UFWM resisted the economic and political structures of monopoly capitalism that served the interests of the wealthy and privileged while oppressing those who laboured to produce that wealth and the Indigenous nations whose land was stolen. They worked tirelessly to build an alternative society based on principles of cooperation and a more equitable sharing of the earth’s resources, and they fought for women’s right to vote, to hold public office, to have an equal share in the assets they worked to produce, as well as equality in divorce, separation and child custody. Their strong agrarian class identity prevented them from affiliating closely with urban middle-class women’s groups and they felt a closer affinity with the working class. They stood in solidarity with First Nations when the Dominion government tried to take additional reserve land for returning soldiers after World War I. However, as determined as UFWM members were in their resistance to the constructed hierarchies of gender and class, their strong identity with their British Anglo-Saxon race and Protestant religion eventually led them to support assimilation and eugenics practices. While the UFWM has much to teach us about the liberating possibilities of collective action in the building of a more equitable society, their strong adherence to constructed racial and religious hierarchies reminds us of the ways racism impedes the fight for truth, reconciliation and social justice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Montgomery, Lindsay M.; Supernant, Kisha;
    Country: Canada

    Archaeology in 2021 was characterized by a continued call to use the tools of the discipline to document the violence of settler colonialism in the past and present, pushing anthropology to reckon with its own role in perpetuating historical trauma. The tension between disciplinary reflection and reform was most clearly articulated in the use of archaeological geophysics to detect the unmarked graves of incarcerated Indigenous children who died at residential and boarding schools in Canada and the United States. The highly publicized investigation of these schools has brought renewed attention to issues of repatriation and historical reclamation for many communities impacted by settler colonialism. These discussions have reverberated throughout the discipline, prompting revisions to the Society for American Archaeology's “Statement Concerning the Treatment of Human Remains,” reopening conversations around an African American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and informing debates around the ethics of DNA research. These conversations are part of a larger movement toward decolonizing the field by using archaeological methods to explore marginalized histories and support communities most impacted by the violences of settler colonialism.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access French
    Authors: 
    Razavi, Sepehr;
    Publisher: Université de Montréal
    Country: Canada

    Cette étude vise à esquisser les fondements et influences philosophiques de la pensée de l’historien de l’art Aby Warburg par le biais de deux penseurs : Friedrich Nietzsche et Ernst Cassirer. La question de la mémoire offre un fil conducteur à cette investigation dans la mesure où, pour Warburg, celle-ci est véhiculée de manière insigne par et dans l’image. D’abord, il s’agira de souligner que la Renaissance italienne, point de départ de l’investigation mémorielle de ce dernier, s’est présentée avant tout en tant que question au sein de l’imagination historique allemande. C’est notamment chez l’historien de la culture Jacob Burckhardt et Nietzsche, deux maîtres à penser de Warburg, que cette période historique est thématisée pour repenser le rapport de l’individu à son passé. Ensuite, l’approche des sciences de la culture, une constellation disciplinaire duquel se revendique Warburg, nous permet de voir de quelle manière la méthode de celui-ci se distingue de l’abstraction esthétique afin de préserver le sens équivoque de la mémoire et la possibilité de faire l’expérience vivante ou posthume de l’image. Enfin, c’est par le biais du symbole, objet d’étude centrale de la philosophie de Cassirer, que Warburg en viendra à penser les polarités de l’image. Sans vouloir rabattre la pensée de Warburg sur celle d’un système, le dialogue avec Cassirer permettra de voir comment ceux-ci ont réussi leur pari de rendre compte de la pensée mythique et de ses intermédiaires avec la raison. This study aims to outline the philosophical foundations and influences of art historian Aby Warburg's work through two thinkers: Friedrich Nietzsche and Ernst Cassirer. The question of memory offers a red thread to this investigation insofar as, for Warburg, it is conveyed in an insignificant way in and through the image. First, it will be emphasized that the Italian Renaissance, the starting point of his investigation of memory, was presented above all as a question within the German historical imagination. In particular, the cultural historian Jacob Burckhardt and Nietzsche, two of Warburg's influences, thematized this historical period in order to rethink the relationship of the individual to his past. Secondly, the approach of cultural sciences, a disciplinary constellation used by Warburg, allows us to see how his method differs from aesthetic abstraction to preserve the equivocal meaning of memory and the possibility of experience the life or the afterlife of images. Finally, it is through the symbol, the central object of study in Cassirer's philosophy, that Warburg comes to ponder the polarities of the image. Without seeking to reduce Warburg's thought to that of a system, the dialogue with Cassirer will make it possible to see how they succeeded in their wager to give an account of mythical thought and its intermediaries with reason.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
435 Research products, page 1 of 44
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dong, Ximing;
    Country: Canada

    Bi-directional Encoder Representations from Transformers (BERT) is the state-of-the-art deep learning model for pre-training natural language processing (NLP) tasks such as sentiment analysis. The BERT model dynamically generates word representations according to the context and semantics using its bi-directional and attention mechanism features. The model, although, improves precision on NLP tasks, is compute-intensive and time-consuming to deploy on mobile or smaller platforms. In this thesis, to address this issue, we use knowledge distillation (KD), a "teacher-student" training technique, to compress the model. We use the BERT model as the "teacher" model to transfer knowledge to student models, ``first-generation'' convolution neural networks, and long-short term memory with attention mechanism (LSTM-atten). We conduct various experiments on sentiment analysis benchmark data sets and show that the “student models” through knowledge distillation have better performance with 70% improvement in accuracy, precision, recall, and F1-score compared to models without KD. We also investigate the convergence rate of student models and compare the results to the existing models in the literature. Finally, we show that compared to the full-size BERT model, our RNN series models are 50 times smaller in size and retain approximately 96% performance on benchmark data sets.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Valles Duran, Magnolia;
    Country: Canada

    For centuries, Spanish midwives provided essential care to the women in their communities. They were counsellors, wet nurses, and herbalists, as well as, aiding during labor and delivery. However, due to the professionalisation of medicine and the creation of new regulatory bodies, their position within the medical field changed. While midwives were often not allowed to be part of these regulatory bodies, such as the Protomedicato, university-educated physicians used these institutions to assert their dominance over the medical field. Thus, through various marginalisation practices against midwives, university-educated physicians attempted to undermine and limit their role within the newly established medical order. This thesis will explore the different marginalisation practices that these new institutions imposed on midwives, their effects on the trade of midwifery, and how the status of midwives and physicians evolved due to these changes.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sommerfeldt, James;
    Country: Canada

    This research utilizes a twofold approach: the general framework of archaeogaming; and the theoretical position of affective history. Using the video game Assassin’s Creed Odyssey as a case study, this research paper provides a critique of the current literature as it relates to the topics of archaeogaming and affective history. Documented archaeological findings of Olympia are examined in known literature, as well as in the designed environment of the video game. The study provides further understanding of how archaeogaming is defined as the “archaeology both in and of digital games” (Reinhard 2) and how the application of affective history theory, the study of the past with emotional and human experience through re-enactment, holds the potential to open new avenues of study in classical archaeology. This research demonstrates how video games and classical archaeology merge together, providing an alternative form of study that can be applied to classical studies.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reyes Ayala, Brenda; Du, Qiufeng; Han, Juyi;
    Country: Canada

    Presented at the Linked Archives 2022: International Workshop on Archives and Linked Data at the 26th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL2022), Padua, Italy.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jordaan, Jacqueline;
    Country: Canada

    Museums are sites of representation and contestation; especially in South Africa, where the representation of African peoples’ pasts are often found in Eurocentric oriented museums. Museums, as retainers of material culture could present alternative understandings of African peoples’ pasts, one not subject to a Eurocentric valorisation of the written word as the blueprint of development and complexity. To this point, the practice of archaeology and its potential contribution to public understandings of African peoples’ pasts become critical to African centring. Framed within a larger discussion of coloniality, I use qualitative methods to assess museum display themes across KwaZulu-Natal, colonial and apartheid narratives and reframing opportunities at the KwaZulu-Natal Museum, and the museum as a teaching resource. In this dissertation, I discuss de-linking strategies, such as the use of orality and museum educator orientation, which hold potential to create a humanism that expands African peoples’ contributions to the stories of humanity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jensby, Matthew;
    Country: Canada

    Teeth are commonly excavated items among archaeological assemblages and provide key insights to the individual from which they develop. Specifically, dental enamel registers evidence of biorhythmic growth (and disruption) within the tooth crown morphology as enamel is deposited. The present research investigates evidence of systemic growth disruption among the molars of archaeological barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) excavated from the LdFa-1 site in southern Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. This study is the first to examine Rangifer crowns from the inside-out, exploring both the internal composition of enamel and surface morphology. With minimal prior data available, the overall focus of this project is to begin establishing locational patterns and frequencies of developmental disruption observed among each molar type (M1-3). Examining growth disruption at the enamel surface is accomplished by generating a profile of each tooth using laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and assessed with two recently developed overlay techniques (a 6th order polynomial trendline and a spline curve) (Cares Henriquez and Oxenham 2020; Gamble and Milne 2018). Histological thin sections are then created and observed under polarized light to identify evidence of developmental disruption among the internal enamel matrices. A disruption event is represented by a dark line (accentuated stria of Retzius) where enamel secretion experienced abnormal pause. This study finds the spline curve to be a better fit for analyzing surface profiles via LSCM compared to 6th order polynomial, but the technique produces inaccurate evidence of enamel growth disruption. However, of 39 accentuated striae of Retzius terminating at the outer enamel surface, 23 could be associated with surface defects. This suggests that an LSCM spline curve may be a useful analytical tool for future research, but should only be applied as a supplemental approach to a more established method of identifying enamel growth defects (such as scoring accentuated striae of Retzius). This study incorporates such an approach to the present data, producing initial locational frequencies of surficial developmental disruption (referred to as linear enamel hypoplasia, or LEH) among Rangifer teeth. These trends are then interpreted based on general, yet highly synchronic caribou life-history patterns with potential to result in growth disruption.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cook, Matthew;
    Country: Canada

    Language is not only a tool for communication, but a window into human nature and the mind. The way we talk about ourselves, others, and the world around us reveals our personalities, mental health, self- and group-serving biases, and more. Though many sources of language exist to understand human psychology, newspapers provide a unique opportunity for studying changes in attitudes, values, and beliefs. In this thesis, I analyzed 221 years (1789-2009) of American historical newspaper data from two historical newspaper corpora (Chronicling America and the Corpus of Historical America English [COHA]). The volume of data is more than could ever be read by any scholar or group of scholars. Therefore, I made use of a standard computational language model of distributed semantics called the Random Permutation (RP) model that “reads” through a corpus of text and generates a mathematical representation of word meaning (i.e., a vector representation). I used the RP model to generate a vector representation for each word written in each decade of the newspapers. The result of this procedure is a 3000-dimensional vector space where each word in each decade is represented as a point in a space that evolves through time. Similar words (e.g., dog and canine) occupy similar regions in the semantic vector space, whereas dissimilar words (e.g., dog and toolbox) occupy dissimilar regions in the semantic space. Having derived dozens of sets of vectors, I first conducted a series of four experiments using unambiguous ground truths to validate the semantic meaning embedding within the vector space. After validating the vectors, I used several methods, including machine learning methods, to measure long term changes in attitudes, values, and beliefs through an analysis of language. In addition to the computational work, I conducted an empirical experiment that demonstrated that the methods I used to measure meaning also predict peoples’ behavioural bias in real-world consequential decisions (i.e., job hiring). The ultimate goal of the thesis is to advance computational methods for accurately predicting people’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviour from language.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thompson, Eleanor Glenne;
    Country: Canada

    In the second decade of the twentieth century, the resistance of Canadian prairie farm women to the inequities of the Dominion government’s national policies, coupled with their growing awareness of women’s unequal rights, gave rise to the formation of semi-autonomous farm women’s organizations in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. These women were part of the agrarian protest movement that has left its mark on the political, economic and social structures of Canada. Considerable research has shed light on the organized farm women of Saskatchewan and Alberta, but little has been written about the United Farm Women of Manitoba (UFWM). Drawing on the extensive files of the UFWM preserved in the Archives of Manitoba as well as relevant secondary sources, this thesis situates members of the UFWM in the context of settler colonialism and utilizes the intersectional analyses of gender, class, race, religion, ethnicity and region to examine these women’s lives and work, both on the farm and in the public sphere, between 1916 and 1936. The UFWM resisted the economic and political structures of monopoly capitalism that served the interests of the wealthy and privileged while oppressing those who laboured to produce that wealth and the Indigenous nations whose land was stolen. They worked tirelessly to build an alternative society based on principles of cooperation and a more equitable sharing of the earth’s resources, and they fought for women’s right to vote, to hold public office, to have an equal share in the assets they worked to produce, as well as equality in divorce, separation and child custody. Their strong agrarian class identity prevented them from affiliating closely with urban middle-class women’s groups and they felt a closer affinity with the working class. They stood in solidarity with First Nations when the Dominion government tried to take additional reserve land for returning soldiers after World War I. However, as determined as UFWM members were in their resistance to the constructed hierarchies of gender and class, their strong identity with their British Anglo-Saxon race and Protestant religion eventually led them to support assimilation and eugenics practices. While the UFWM has much to teach us about the liberating possibilities of collective action in the building of a more equitable society, their strong adherence to constructed racial and religious hierarchies reminds us of the ways racism impedes the fight for truth, reconciliation and social justice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Montgomery, Lindsay M.; Supernant, Kisha;
    Country: Canada

    Archaeology in 2021 was characterized by a continued call to use the tools of the discipline to document the violence of settler colonialism in the past and present, pushing anthropology to reckon with its own role in perpetuating historical trauma. The tension between disciplinary reflection and reform was most clearly articulated in the use of archaeological geophysics to detect the unmarked graves of incarcerated Indigenous children who died at residential and boarding schools in Canada and the United States. The highly publicized investigation of these schools has brought renewed attention to issues of repatriation and historical reclamation for many communities impacted by settler colonialism. These discussions have reverberated throughout the discipline, prompting revisions to the Society for American Archaeology's “Statement Concerning the Treatment of Human Remains,” reopening conversations around an African American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, and informing debates around the ethics of DNA research. These conversations are part of a larger movement toward decolonizing the field by using archaeological methods to explore marginalized histories and support communities most impacted by the violences of settler colonialism.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access French
    Authors: 
    Razavi, Sepehr;
    Publisher: Université de Montréal
    Country: Canada

    Cette étude vise à esquisser les fondements et influences philosophiques de la pensée de l’historien de l’art Aby Warburg par le biais de deux penseurs : Friedrich Nietzsche et Ernst Cassirer. La question de la mémoire offre un fil conducteur à cette investigation dans la mesure où, pour Warburg, celle-ci est véhiculée de manière insigne par et dans l’image. D’abord, il s’agira de souligner que la Renaissance italienne, point de départ de l’investigation mémorielle de ce dernier, s’est présentée avant tout en tant que question au sein de l’imagination historique allemande. C’est notamment chez l’historien de la culture Jacob Burckhardt et Nietzsche, deux maîtres à penser de Warburg, que cette période historique est thématisée pour repenser le rapport de l’individu à son passé. Ensuite, l’approche des sciences de la culture, une constellation disciplinaire duquel se revendique Warburg, nous permet de voir de quelle manière la méthode de celui-ci se distingue de l’abstraction esthétique afin de préserver le sens équivoque de la mémoire et la possibilité de faire l’expérience vivante ou posthume de l’image. Enfin, c’est par le biais du symbole, objet d’étude centrale de la philosophie de Cassirer, que Warburg en viendra à penser les polarités de l’image. Sans vouloir rabattre la pensée de Warburg sur celle d’un système, le dialogue avec Cassirer permettra de voir comment ceux-ci ont réussi leur pari de rendre compte de la pensée mythique et de ses intermédiaires avec la raison. This study aims to outline the philosophical foundations and influences of art historian Aby Warburg's work through two thinkers: Friedrich Nietzsche and Ernst Cassirer. The question of memory offers a red thread to this investigation insofar as, for Warburg, it is conveyed in an insignificant way in and through the image. First, it will be emphasized that the Italian Renaissance, the starting point of his investigation of memory, was presented above all as a question within the German historical imagination. In particular, the cultural historian Jacob Burckhardt and Nietzsche, two of Warburg's influences, thematized this historical period in order to rethink the relationship of the individual to his past. Secondly, the approach of cultural sciences, a disciplinary constellation used by Warburg, allows us to see how his method differs from aesthetic abstraction to preserve the equivocal meaning of memory and the possibility of experience the life or the afterlife of images. Finally, it is through the symbol, the central object of study in Cassirer's philosophy, that Warburg comes to ponder the polarities of the image. Without seeking to reduce Warburg's thought to that of a system, the dialogue with Cassirer will make it possible to see how they succeeded in their wager to give an account of mythical thought and its intermediaries with reason.