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86 Research products, page 1 of 9

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school across our (3) three campuses have successfully completed up to the Autumn period of 2022. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Summer Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school (across our three campuses in Grangegorman, Tallaght and Blanchardstown) have successfully completed up to the Summer period of 2022. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mahon, Elaine;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mahon, Elaine;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland
  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Garry, Mark;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This thesis will enable a retrospective critical examination of aspects of my practice as an artist from 2005 - 2020. The research question addresses the implication of multiple forms of inter-reliance enabled in the practice. This will be enabled by opening a discursive space that retrospectively, integrates and critically examines the role and function of inter-reliance as a structural methodology and how this is implicated in the practice over this period. This thesis will use term inter-reliance to define a play of relations where individual art works when viewed in isolation exist only in partial illumination as a form of penumbra. The art works are inchoate as separate entities only becoming activated or fully realised when engaged with collectively and interdiscursively, as a set of enabled relationships. In each of the chapters inter-reliance is manifested as a set of specific enabled reciprocal relationships between artistic mechanisms and physical, perceptual, associative, sonic, contextual and cinematic space. Rather than make art for art’s sake or art that specifically engages with trends or tendencies within the art world, it will elucidate how the practice is relational and empathetic, facilitating an inter-reliance between artist and viewer and artist and society, the practice engages with and reflects upon broader society where articulations of ideological positions are subtly embedded.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Winter Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions, special civic, community and sustainability activities which the students and staff members of the school have successfully completed up to the Winter period of 2021. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters. We thank you all, consider getting involved in our New Campus (Central Quad, Grangegorman, Dublin 7). Take care and stay safe !!

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions, special civic, community and sustainability activities which the students and staff members of the school have successfully completed up to the Autumn period of 2021. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters. We thank you all, consider getting involved in our New Campus here at Central Quad, Grangegorman, Dublin 7). email: scaft@tudublin.ie for further details and our school programmes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Woods, Fiona;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This arts practice-based research [APBR] addresses a political and ethical problem, namely how a creative practice can operate contrary to the destructive, predatory forces of extractive capitalism. The research took the systemic, socio-spatial violence of enclosure and economisation as a starting point, anchored in the concrete conditions of Limerick city, to test the critical, political possibilities of collaborative, cultural work. From an examination of the ways in which lived space is subsumed under the abstractive logic of ‘the Economy’, two processes of abstraction and enclosure are isolated and examined: i) a hollowing out of publicness, captured by the lexigraph public (strikethrough), and ii) a process described as the economisation of space, a hegemonic framing of urban space in purely economic terms, which draws local inhabitants into a performative idea of what the city means, and who it is for. Working through a socially engaged process, a critical and cognitive mapping methodology was conjoined with the emergent phenomena of aesthetic events, to generate ways of knowing, producing and acting in common, contrary to processes of enclosure and economisation. Through an extended analysis of selected aesthetic actions – Free*Space; Critical Cartographies; Contested Sites; and The Laboratory of Common Interest (2015 – 2019) – the thesis argues i) that the social order of extractive capitalism is underpinned by an aesthetic order, which acts upon the embodied dispositions of populations; and ii) that the aesthetic order is susceptible to modification through a practice identified as aesthetic work, which is unpacked and explicated in detail. The thesis includes a fully diagrammatic chapter that deliberately interrupts the research narrative, complicating the question of how knowledge is understood, produced and validated, and by whom.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anderson, Sven;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This doctoral research advances the fields of urban sound design and acoustic planning, presenting new ways of exploring the interrelationship between individual and collective sonic experience, the dynamic potential of the urban sound environment and the complex evolution of the contemporary cityscape. It links urban sound art practices with larger urban design processes, revealing how sound contributes to the production of urban space. The research progresses by crafting a dynamic, integrative methodology that activates contrasting sonic perspectives to critically reassess the role of sound in the public realm. As it discloses this methodology, the research navigates the tension between new modes of urban sound design guided by critical artistic practice and more conventional strategies rooted in the paradigm of environmental noise. Efforts to address urban sonic conditions through quantifiable metrics are contextualised within a wider transition in which urban form is increasingly influenced by data capture, analysis and governance. Within this transition, the critical potential of sound as an active component of urban space is obscured by remedial strategies established to improve what are construed as unfavourable conditions. This research analyses the relationship between these remedial strategies, the emergence of the ISO soundscape standard and the concepts of urban ambiances, urban atmospheres and acoustic territories. It postulates that these centralising conceptual models can serve to limit as well as to advance the critical potential of this field, pursuing instead a more tactical, performative and pluralistic methodology. The articulation of this methodology is substantiated through the exposition of three major public artworks developed by the author, including: Continuous Drift (2015–), a permanent sound installation in a public urban square; The Manual for Acoustic Planning and Urban Sound Design (2013–2020), an artist placement exploring the role of the acoustic planner within a local authority; and The Office for Common Sound (2016–), a project space that fosters dialogue concerning sound within specific regional and institutional contexts. These projects expand the role of artistic practice within the context of urban design and spatial planning by activating the field of urban sound design within diverse spatial, administrative and social contexts. These projects extend established methodologies drawn from sound art, site-specific art and sound installation practices with tactics inherited from public, participatory and socially engaged art, demonstrating how artist-led strategies for urban sound design can advance new forms of spatial production through collaboration with diverse urban actors.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Higgins, Daire;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The area of media assistance is not a widely known part of the Development Aid sector, even though it has been in existence since after World War II and has grown significantly since then as part of the development agenda. Media Assistance has been included in the strategies of Western and non Western donors as part of their overseas Aid programmes in many regions, supporting journalism and media with the objectives of contributing to accountability, transparency, governance and ultimately, democracy. This thesis examines the impact on the Media Assistance sector of the arrival of digital technologies into the ‘information ecosystems’ in which it operates. Whereas historically in Media Assistance, broadcast media and the press have been the preferred (or available) media for achieving development objectives, digital technologies such as mobile phones and social media are radically altering the landscape of Media Assistance. In Africa, where mobile phones are heralded as a “gift to development”, donors have been exploring the potential of these tools to achieve their development objective. As a consequence, the area of ICTs for Development (ICT4D) has flourished. At a time when the narrative in the western media has been of an “Africa Rising” and of techno-determinism, this research asks whether these digital technologies are indeed being used to achieve Media Assistance objectives in practice. If they are being integrated into media development programmes – or even replacing media development programmes - to what level of success? To answer this question, the thesis focuses on two countries in East Africa – Kenya and Tanzania – and interviews 40 stakeholders working in media assistance in these countries. The research finds that in fact many projects continue to use traditional methods. This is due to issues such as the digital divide, technical literacy, and continuing preference for traditional media by wider populations in these countries. Furthermore, the study notes that the virtual public sphere facilitated by the internet is not accessible to all, nor is it an ideal public sphere. Finally, citizens of these countries, the research finds, do not necessarily use these technologies for participation or accountability ends. Thus, despite widespread diffusion of technologies such as mobile phones in both these countries, there is still an important role for traditional media development approaches to achieve donor objectives in the new information ecosystem.