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126 Research products, page 3 of 13

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Other research product . 2013
    English
    Authors: 
    Diane Bergman;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Bernard V. Bothmer left his mark on the world of Egyptology in three of the United States’ great art institutions; the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the Brooklyn Museum and the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University. He created gallery displays, developed library collections and founded image collections that continue to influence. One can wonder how the course of American Egyptology would have flowed if terrible circumstances had not driven him out of his native Germany. Despite hardship, fear and a career interrupted, he trained and profoundly influenced at least four generations of historians of Egyptian art. His output of research, exhibitions, teaching and publishing was produced with perfection as the goal. BVB, as he was affectionately known to those close to him, inspired all who worked with him to the highest level of achievement which came to be known as “Brooklyn Quality".

  • Other research product . 2012
    English
    Authors: 
    Ruth Bird;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Bodleian Law Library has only existed as an entity in its own right for less than 50 years. Yet part of the collection dates back to the days before the founding of the Bodleian Library in 1602. The rise and fall in the fortunes of the teaching of law at Oxford is closely tied to the establishment of the law library. A lesser known aspect of the history includes the ties between Oxford and the United States, especially its oldest law school, The College of William and Mary law School. This paper offers a brief history of the evolution of the law library, and some links with our cousins across the pond.

  • English
    Authors: 
    David Zeitlyn;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Derrida and Foucault provide key starting points to understanding archives. They see archives as hegemonic, characterizing ways of thought, modes of colonization, and the control of citizens. However, they also make clear that archives can be read subversively. With patience, counter-readings allow the excavation of the voices (sometimes names) of subaltern and otherwise suppressed others from the archive. By reading along and across the archival grain, researchers can follow the development of ideas and processes across historical periods. Archives can be seen as orphanages, containing surrogates of performances. Archives (paper and digital) also provide access to the results of anthropological research in ways mandated by ethics codes, but these are subject to controversy. What sorts of consent and what sorts of anonymization should be provided? Archives run by the groups traditionally studied by anthropologists provide models of radical archives that are very different from those conceived of by traditional archivists.

  • Other research product . 2011
    English
    Authors: 
    Jason Eric Birch;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This essay was prompted by the question of how Haṭhayoga, literally 'the Yoga of force', acquired its name. Many Indian and Western scholars have understood the 'force' of Haṭhayoga to refer to the effort required to practice it. Inherent in this understanding is the assumption that Haṭhayoga techniques such as prāṇāyāma (breath control) are strenuous and may even cause pain. Others eschew the notion of force altogether and favor the so-called 'esoteric' definition of Haṭhayoga (i.e, the union of the sun (ha) and moon (ṭha) in the body). This essay examines these interpretations in light of definitions of haṭhayoga and the adverbial uses of haṭha (i.e, haṭhāt, haṭhena) in Sanskrit Yoga texts that predate the fifteenth-century Haṭhapradīpikā.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Rana Mitter;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper argues that the first phase of the Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1945 saw a significant change in the relationship between state and society in China, leading to a greater use of techniques of classification of the citizenry for purposes of welfare provision and mobilization through propaganda, methods until recently more associated with the Communists than with their Nationalist rivals. The paper draws on materials from Sichuan, the key province for wartime resistance, showing that the use of identity cards and welfare provision regulations were part of a process of integrating refugees from occupied China into the wider wartime society, and that propaganda campaigns were deployed to persuade the local indigenous population to support wartime state initiatives. Although Nationalist efforts to mobilize the population in wartime were flawed and partial, they marked a significant change in the conception of Chinese citizenship.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David Tomkins;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Mapping Crime project sought to enhance crime material available via the online digital resource The John Johnson Collection: an Archive of Printed Ephemera through the creation of direct links to related material in a number of external online resources, thereby enabling those studying crime history in particular, and social history in general, to more easily explore themes and narratives by building connections between different sources. This paper describes the context of the project and its outcomes, before exploring aspects of the project methodology, particularly with regard to its manual approach to gathering information and establishing links. It then considers the potential for future developments.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Margaret Hillenbrand;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Rosalind O'Hanlon;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Often migrants into western India as servants of the Bahmani kings and Deccan Sultanate states, Maratha kāyasthas were newcomers into local societies whose Brahmin communities had hitherto commanded more exclusive possession of scribal and literate skills. From the mid-fifteenth century, periodic but intense disputes developed over kāyastha entitlement to the rituals of the twice-born. The issue was debated along the intellectual networks linking the Maratha country with pandit assemblies in Banaras. The survival of Kṣatriyas in the modern age of the Kaliyuga was a question of critical significance to these pandit intellectuals, dividing Brahmins in the Maratha regions from some of their fellow pandits in Banaras, and shaping their wider conception of the nature of the social order in their own times. Maratha Brahmins developed some of their most important arguments about these questions in the context of the early debates about kāyasthas. Both in their own guru lineages and within the pandit assemblies of Banaras, kāyasthas found able defenders of their entitlements, even as they entrenched themselves locally as a land and office-holding elite. These tensions came together during the royal consecration in 1674 of the Maratha warrior leader Sivaji. The conflict of these years cast a long shadow, helping to set the terms of debate about the nature of the social order through into the colonial period and after.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Felicity Henderson; William Poole;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • Other research product . 2009
    English
    Authors: 
    Ritchie Robertson;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Catholic culture is popularly supposed not to be conducive to curiosity. Yet the Austrian Enlightenment, which reached its peak in the 1780s but had intellectual and institutional roots earlier in the eighteenth century, encouraged curiosity - sometimes unofficial - in many areas. The three here examined are: the study of the Bible and Church history; natural science; and ethnography, or the description of foreign peoples, a genre which developed from travel literature and became fully established at the end of the century.