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2,356 Research products, page 1 of 236

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Research data
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  • 2012-2021
  • Open Access
  • ZENODO
  • SEDICI (UNLP) - Universidad Nacional de La Plata

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Asmelash Teka Hadgu;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Wikipedia is the largest encyclopedia ever assembled with the vision of enabling every human being to freely share in the sum of all knowledge. Wikipedia currently has a total of more than six million articles and over 17 billion words in its English edition. Unfortunately, millions of people cannot access this resource because it’s not available in their language. For instance, at the moment there are only 218 Tigrinya Wikipedia and 15,018 Amharic Wikipedia articles. In this project, we investigate the problem of translating Wikipedia articles from a high resource language into low resource languages using human-in-the-loop MT systems. In particular, we investigate different approaches to translate a sample of English Wikipedia articles into Tigrinya and Amharic. Currently, this repository contains 100k English Wikipeida abstracts translated using Lesan (https://lesan.ai) into Amharic and Tigrinya. Structure of data directory: data ├── human └── mt ├── google ├── lesan │ ├── am.txt │ ├── en.txt │ └── ti.txt └── microsoft

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Egeland, Charles; Fadem, Cynthia; Byerly, Ryan; Henderson, Cory; Fitzgerald, Curran; Mabulla, Audax; Baquedano, Enrique; Gidna, Agniss;
    Publisher: Dryad

    Variable Description Type Type of sample (calibration = calibration coin for Delta Innov-X Analyzer; standard = NIST geological standard; geological = geological sample from lithic raw material source; artifact = archaeological specimen) Replicate Replicate measurement (Yes or No) Source Geological source (delta = Delta Innov-x Analyzer calibration coin; nist = National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) geological standard; NS = Naibor Soit; NH = Naisuisui Hill; OL = Oldonye Okule; LD = Lemagarut drainage; SS = Shifting Sand; KG = Kelogi Hills; EN = Engelosin) Outcrop Individual outcrop within geological source (NSM = Naibor Soit Main Hill; NSMH = Naibor Soit Manyata Hill; NSSO = Naibor Soit Southern Outlier; NH = Naisuisui Hill; LD1 = Lemagarut Drainage 1; LD2 = Lemagarut Drainage 2; BKE = BK East; SS = Shifting Sand; KG = Kelogi Hills; EN = Engelosin; NA = Not applicable) Specimen Individual find or sample number Material Raw material type (QTZ = "Quartz-rich"; GN = Gneiss; FGV = Fine-grained volcanic) Element concentration estimate Reported for each element (e.g., P, Cl, Ca; empty cells are "non-detect") Analytical error Reported for each element (e.g., P +/-, Cl +/-, Ca +/-; no error reported for "non-detect" elements) The published analysis focused only on granulite specimens (n = 186) and, more specifically, on six elements (Fe, Ti, Zr, K, Sr, and Y) that had detection rates >75% in the granulite specimens (that is, these elements were detected in more than 75% of the granulite specimens). These elements were used in the predictive models from the published analysis. Two of the 186 granulite specimens were missing values for five out of the six elements and were therefore not included in the statistical analyses. Of the remaining 184 specimens, 55 had missing data for one element, and two of those 55 had missing data for two elements. These missing values were treated as censored data (that is, the element is present but could not be measured precisely enough for the instrument to report a value). These missing values were interpolated in one of two ways. For those specimens subjected to replicate pXRF runs (n = 7), the missing value was replaced with the mean value of the replicates. The missing values for the remaining specimens (n = 48) were replaced with the mean of the four closest (as determined in two-dimensional space) specimens with measured (rather than interpolated) values. The main data file does not include these interpolated values. Should analysts choose to use them, interpolated values can be found in the additional .csv file. The invention and proliferation of stone tool technology in the Early Stone Age (ESA) marks a watershed in human evolution. Patterns of lithic procurement, manufacture, use, and discard have much to tell us about ESA hominin cognition and land use. However, these issues cannot be fully explored outside the context of the physical attributes and spatio-temporal availability of the lithic raw materials themselves. The Olduvai Basin of northern Tanzania, which is home to both a wide variety of potential toolstones and a rich collection of ESA archaeological sites, provides an excellent opportunity to investigate the relationship between lithic technology and raw material characteristics. Here, we examine two attributes of the basin's igneous and metamorphic rocks: spatial location and fracture predictability. A total of 244 geological specimens were analyzed with non-destructive portable XRF (pXRF) to determine the geochemical distinctiveness of five primary and secondary sources, while 110 geological specimens were subjected to Schmidt rebound hardness tests to measure fracture predictability. Element concentrations derived via pXRF show significant differences between sources, and multivariate predictive models classify geological specimens with 75–80% accuracy. The predictive models identify Naibor Soit as the most likely source for a small sample of three lithic artifacts from Bed II, which supports the idea that this inselberg served as a source of toolstone during the early Pleistocene. Clear patterns in fracture predictability exist within and between both sources and rock types. Fine-grained volcanics show high rebound values (associated with high fracture predictability), while finer-grained metamorphics and coarsegrained gneisses show intermediate and low rebound values, respectively. Artifact data from Bed I and II suggest that fracture predictability played a role in raw material selection at some sites, but other attributes like durability, expediency, and nodule size and shape were more significant. A total of 244 rock specimens (aka "geological specimens") were collected from eight primary (six granulite outcrops, one gneiss outcrop, one phonolite outcrop) and one secondary (a seasonal drainage containing basalt blocks) lithic raw material sources in the Olduvai Basin. Rock specimens were flaked directly from the sources with a rockhammer. Only granulite specimens with visually quartz-rich compositions were selected. Five quartz-rich metamorphic artifacts (aka "archaeological specimens") from BK East, a ca. 1.5 million-year-old site on the south wall of the side gorge in Olduvai Gorge, were also included. Portable XRF (pXRF) analyses were conducted with an Innov-X Delta Classic Environmental Analyzer equipped with a 4W Au anode X-ray tube and a Si-PIN diode detector. All analyses were performed while the instrument was docked into a stable, hands-free test stand. An unweathered, non-cortical surface free of sediment matrix was placed over, and completely covered, the detector window. Each specimen was measured for 360 seconds using all three of the instrument's beams (120 seconds/beam). After an initial energy scale calibration test with a factory issued metal coin of known composition, the following protocol was observed: (1) a powdered sample of Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2702 with elemental concentrations certified by NIST was measured; (2) four geological/archaeological specimens were then measured; (3) the fifth geological/archaeological specimen in a series was measured five times (that is, five consecutive 360-second cycles) without being moved or reoriented; (4) after the fifth geological/archaeological specimen was measured, the SRM 2702 sample was measured once again, which initiated the next series of measurements. Element concentrations were derived with the Compton Normalization correction model and the factory-set “Soil Environmental” calibration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Divya M. Persaud; Robert Barnes;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    {"references": ["Barnes, R., S. Gupta, C. Traxler, T. Ortner, A. Bauer, G. Hesina, G. Paar, et al. 2018. \"Geological Analysis of Martian Rover-Derived Digital Outcrop Models Using the 3-D Visualization Tool, Planetary Robotics 3-D Viewer\u2014PRo3D.\" Earth and Space Science 5: 1\u201323. https://doi.org/10.1002/2018EA000374.", "Fraeman, A. A., B. L. Ehlmann, R. E. Arvidson, C. S. Edwards, J. P. Grotzinger, R. E. Milliken, D. P. Quinn, and M. S. Rice. 2016. \"The Stratigraphy and Evolution of Lower Mount Sharp from Spectral, Morphological, and Thermophysical Orbital Data Sets.\" Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets 121 (9): 1713\u201336. https://doi.org/10.1002/2016JE005095.Received.", "Hughes, M. N. 2021. \"Landscape Evolution at Endeavour and Gale Craters on Mars, and How Terrain Characteristics Correlate with Mineralogy on Lower Mount Sharp, Gale Crater.\" https://doi.org/10.7936/c6se-5895.", "Milliken, R. E., J. P. Grotzinger, and B. J. Thomson. 2010. \"Paleoclimate of Mars as Captured by the Stratigraphic Record in Gale Crater.\" Geophysical Research Letters 37 (4): 1\u20136. https://doi.org/10.1029/2009GL041870.", "Persaud, D. M. (2021). Co-registered U. Arizona HiRISE DTM and ORI over Sakarya Vallis, Gale Crater, Mars [Data set]. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5808371", "Persaud, D. M. (2021). Multi-Resolution Basemap of Northwest Aeolis Mons, Gale Crater, Mars [Data set]. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5808381", "Thomson, B. J., N. T. Bridges, R. E. Milliken, A. M. Baldridge, S. J. Hook, J. K. Crowley, G. M. Marion, C. R. de Souza Filho, A. J. Brown, and C. M. Weitz. 2011. \"Constraints on the Origin and Evolution of the Layered Mound in Gale Crater, Mars Using Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Data.\" Icarus 214 (2): 413\u201332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2011.05.002."]} This dataset comprises the unit map derived from 3D analysis of Sakarya Vallis in Gale crater, Mars. The units are named Package 1–7. These packages have been extrapolated from morpho-stratigraphic analysis of a HiRISE scene in PRo3D. They have been further extrapolated using underlying image data. Included here is a shapefile representing the marker bed (Milliken et al. 2010) in Gale crater. The "CDD" refers to the Central Debris Deposit, identified by Hughes (2021). The structural data represents dip measurements along the boundaries of these packages within the feature; the "sub-package" data represent layering within the packages. For more on how dip is calculated in PRo3D, see https://pro3d.space/. Finally, the profiles mark the locations where topographic profiles were extracted for constructing cross-sections, as discussed in the thesis Persaud (2022). These data are intended to be displayed with the HiRISE ORI (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5808371) and CTX ORI mosaic (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5808357) over Sakarya Vallis, and over the basemap over the northwest of Aeolis Mons (https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5808381). Format: SHP, SHX, DBF, PRJ, QPJ Projection: Equidistant cylindrical Datum: Spheroid (r = 3396.190 km) N.B. the PROJ4 format of the project is "+proj=eqc +lat_ts=0 +lat_0=0 +lon_0=0 +x_0=0 +y_0=0 +a=3396190 +b=3396190 +units=m +no_defs" The first author is now at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. Contact: divya.m.persaud@jpl.nasa.gov Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Hagmann, Dominik; Langendorf, Alarich; Steininger, Andreas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Photos for the 2015's 3d model of the interior of the so-called witch tower (���Hexenturm���) at the south easteren corner of the outer fortifications of Ulmerfeld Castle. The model was made using 3d photogrammetry (image based modeling) and mast aerial photography.

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Hagmann, Dominik; Langendorf, Alarich; Steininger, Andreas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Photos for the 2015's 3d model of the interior of the so-called witch tower (’Hexenturm’) at the south easteren corner of the outer fortifications of Ulmerfeld Castle. The model was made using 3d photogrammetry (image based modeling) and mast aerial photography.

  • Research data . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    ANURGO PACHECO, Albert;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The dataset includes 35.305 court decisions related to UK asylum requests. The original owner of the data is the UK's Upper Tribunal Immigration and Asylum Chamber (UTIAC). The court decisions were scraped from https://tribunalsdecisions.service.gov.uk/utiac on 28th October 2021. For each court decision the dataset includes the original text of the court as well as a number of explanatory fields that have been generated following an information extraction process. The dataset includes the following fields: 'Case title:', 'Appellant name:', 'Status of case:', 'Hearing date:', 'Promulgation date:', 'Publication date:', 'Last updated on:', 'Country:', 'Judges:', 'Document', 'Reference', 'Download', 'File', 'String', 'ID', 'Code label:', 'Heard at:', 'Decision:', 'Nationality:', 'Representation:', 'Appellant:', 'Respondent:', 'Decision label:', 'Appellant entity:', 'Respondent entity:', 'Country code', 'Keywords', 'Country guidance:', 'Case Notes:', 'Categories:']

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Thornton, Amara; Baker, James;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The dataset `List-of-Women-in-Archaeological-Indexes_cleaned.tsv` contains scholarly articles written by women extracted from annual Indexes of Archaeological Papers published between 1891 and 1907 inclusive and George Laurence Gomme's Index of Archaeological Papers 1665-1890, referred to hereafter as the source datasets. These Indexes were published in London, initially by the Congress of Archaeological Societies directly, and from 1898 by Archibald Constable & Co. The Indexes were sent to Societies subscribing to the Congress, but could also be acquired separately. A list of indexes consulted in available on our Zotero library. The dataset is published in .tsv and .xslx formats. This is v2 of the dataset, including some cleaned publication titles and the addition of the socities that published each journal (v2.1 fixes a faulty dataset export in v2).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mathieu Bernard; Hadrien Titeux;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    phonemizer-3.0.1 This version is linked to the phonemizer JOSS paper. Please see ChangeLog for details on that release.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sivakanth Gopi; Pankaj Gulhane; Janardhan Kulkarni; Judy Hanwen Shen; Milad Shokouhi; Sergey Yekhanin;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    No description provided.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ferdinands, Gerbrich; Teijema, Jelle; De Bruin, Jonathan; Brouwer, Marlies; Van de Schoot, Rens;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This repository contains the scripts for a simulation study performed on data from the systematic review by Brouwer et al. (2019). The goal was to obtain the Time to Discovery (TD) for each relevant paper. The simulation study has the following characteristics: The number of runs is equal to the number of inclusions in the dataset; Every run starts with 1 prior inclusion and 10 prior exclusions; The prior inclusion is different for every run, e.g. all inclusions in the data are used as a prior inclusion once; The 10 prior exclusions are the same for every run, and they are randomly sampled from the dataset. The output is a file with all inclusions ordered by their Time to Discovery.