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31 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paula Matthews;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Exile La colpa di essere nati: Through the Eyes of Italian Jews Song of Exile Exile the emptiness is for however much you brought left with you, there's far more you've Exile is behind. the ego that shrinks, for how can you prove what you were and what you did? Exile is the erasure of pride. the escape that is Exile is often worse than the prison. Exile is the xenophobe in for every single one who likes you, you'U find ten whom there is nothing but hate. Exile Exile it is the loneliness in the middle of a crowd is is longing never to be fulfilled, love unrequited, the loss never replaced listless, loveless, the long wait for the train that never arrives, the piane that never gets off the ground. Exile Exile it is the end and never the beginning the eruption is is whose lava stream carries you away the etemity measured in minutes, the eyes that never enjoy the familiar sight, the ears that listen to alien music. Exile Exile is a song that only the singer can hear. is an illness that not even death can cure for how can you Exile is rest in soil that did not nourish you? the bave But will waming example to those who stili homes, who belong. you take heed of the waming? (Cited by their labori 14) The Italian writer Primo Levi urges us to answer that questioii. The danger in viewing another as an Other, of believing that ogni straniero e nemico lies

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Carolyn Daly;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Futurism's Construction of a Phallic National Identity Italian Futurism is known best for proclamations such as: vogliamo liberare questo paese dalla sua fetida cancrena musei! di professori, d'archeologhi, di ciceroni e d'antiquarii. biblioteche! di Date fuoco i agli scaffali delle Sviate il corso dei canali, per inondare Oh la gioia veder galleggiare alla deriva, lacere e stinte i su quelle acque, le vecchie tele gloriose!. Impugnate piccioni, le scuri, i martelli e demolite, demolite senza pieta le citta venerate! {Fondazione e manifesto del futurismo. Teoria e invenzione futurista 7-13).' However, the Italian Futurists' project was not one solely of destruction, for in Guerra sola igiene del mondo, antagonistic. Marinetti specifically rejects the characterization of Futurism as a movement that was oppositional merely for the sake of being The Futurist project to ricostruire, rather than to destroy, I starting point of this paper. In particular, will be addressing the extent to itself in relation to marks the which such a project of identit>' fabrication constructs patria, a notion of /a and how such a construction of an ideal national self, which, as we will see, is ideally a Futurist self, must be staged on the exterior of the male body.^ It is useful to keep in mind the psychoanalytic observation that identity is fictional rather than imitative. Since Identification is never simply mimetic but involves a strateg}' of wish-fulfillment (Butler 334), identity sholdbe understood as a performative enactment of a fantasy. For the Futurists, that fantasy entails either the repudiation of the feminine, its incorporation or appropriation, or is its masculinization.^ As such, the ideal, it is national self of the Futurists explicitly gendered as masculine. However, the instability of national and gender identity in Futurist nationalist rhetoric that interests me. The very notion of la patria discloses a gender ambiguity in which the motherland, Italy, figures as a surrogate Phallic Mother who both mirrors the national subject's self-identity while, at the same time, representing othemess. One of the centrai Futurist enterprises was the construction of a new

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adriana M. Baranello;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    It is well known that the Futurists exalted speed and danger, worshipping both as god-like forces with the ability to renew the world. As a source of speed and thrill, the car was an important symbol of Futurism, one who’s symbolic impact continues to exert its influence on society and culture. It was not until the post-war period that the car began to take its place in popular culture as an icon and obsession, as the Futurists had sought to make it. The conditions of the "Boom economico" made it possible for the car to permeate the collective consciousness. In the postwar Boom years, many of the same socio-political forces that had been in play before the wars returned in full force, demanding continued negotiation. Through Il sorpasso, Dino Risi’s 1962 film, and Emilio Isgrò’s 1964 Poesia Volkswagen, I will examine the ways in which the Futurist ideology of the macchina as savior is carried through in two prominent cultural manifestations. This will also shed light on the continuing influence of Futurist ideology just when it is being most vehemently denied for its Fascist connections. I will also consider technical aspects of Futurist poetry and the Futurist artistic agenda as further support for the continued influence of Futurist ideology. This will include an examination of the use of parolibere conventions in Isgrò’s poem as well as the thematic similarities between Il sorpasso and the Fondazione e manifesto del Futurismo. Among these similarities are the obsession with speed and danger and the portrayal of the car as a lover. In Isgrò’s poem, the visual composition on the page and the figurative elements are just as critical to a complete understanding of the poem as what the text says.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Emma K Van Ness;
    Publisher: California Digital Library (CDL)
    Country: United States

    Italo Tavolato caused a scandal when the editors of Lacerba published his “Elogio della prostituzione” in 1913, yet this article was one of a number of sexually provocative texts produced in this first phase of Futurism. The subversive and revolutionary nature of this avant-garde art movement was largely based on the overturning and questioning of traditional gender roles, what we would call today a “queer” as opposed to a hetero-normative concept of sexuality. The adoption and praise of the figure of the prostitute by Tavolato speaks to his re-evaluation of traditional sexual morality, making the prostitute a decadent yet honest alternative to reproductive sexual politics “Non costa anche la moglie?” Tavolato rightly asks. Marinetti also makes use of this strategy of undermining expectations of gender in the initial phase of Futurism, his “prostitute-like” tactics of self-promotion garnering him the title the “Pink Poet” according to Claudia Salaris. As the movement spread, however, battle lines were drawn, and traditional gender roles re-established as the distinction between Futurism and Fascism was blurred. Using Lee Edelman’s vision of a hypothetical queer politics from his work No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive as a lens through which to read the progression of the Futurist movement, it becomes apparent that the tension between homosexual and homo-social is not a latent force on the margins of Futurism, but rather a central, formative issue. The role of the prostitute in the writings of the Futurists makes this clear. By examining Marinetti’s and the Milanese futurists’ treatment of Tavolato, Papini, Palazzeschi, and the other Florentines in their correspondence, articles, and manifestoes, as well as Marinetti and Corra’s homophobic novel L’isola dei baci, this paper hopes to illuminate the function of queer politics and the role of reproductive futurism in the history of Italian Futurism.

  • Publication . Article . 1999
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Diana Englemann;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    CARTE ITALIANE Alfieri and Byron In Santa Croce 's holy precincts He Ashes which make it holier, dust which Even in itself an immortality, is Though there were nothing save the past, and The particle of those sublimities Which have relapsed to chaos: here repose Angelo 's. Alfieri 's bones, and his, The starry Galileo, with his woes; Here Macchiavelli's earth retum'd this, to whence it rose. (Childe Harold, Canto IV) Oh qual silenzio! Infi^a i i rimorsi adunque, fra le torbide cure, e rei sospetti le ciglia placido scende ad ingombrar de' traditori e de' tiranni il sonno? Quel, che ognor sfugge l'innocente oppresso? Ma, duro a me non e il vegliare: io co' miei pensieri, e colla stommi immagin cara d'ogni belta, d'ogni virtu... (Philippo, IV.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Andrea Hajek;
    Publisher: California Digital Library (CDL)
    Country: United States

    In 1977, a new Italian student movement arose which turned itself explicitly against traditional left-wing parties and unions. This reaction can be placed in what Jennifer Burns (2001) has identified as a general ‘withdrawal of [literary-political] commitment to macro-political, left/right-wing ideologies, in favour of micro-political, community-based initiatives’ (1), in the 1970s. This is also reflected in the support the students in 1977 received from left-wing intellectuals who engaged more directly with social problems, especially in Bologna, where a student and sympathiser of a former left-wing, extra-parliamentary group - Francesco Lorusso - had been shot dead by a police officer during clashes, on 11 March 1977. A number of local intellectuals turned against the PCI and the way it had handled and interpreted the incidents of March 1977, and in this article I shall discuss the controversial relationship between these intellectuals and the hegemonic powers in Bologna after the incidents of March 1977.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hiju Kim;
    Publisher: California Digital Library (CDL)
    Country: United States
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Emily Salamanca;
    Publisher: California Digital Library (CDL)
    Country: United States

    Author(s): Salamanca, Emily | Abstract: As Florence became more imperially-motivated and ideologically-independent during the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, Florentine humanists increasingly sought to promote the city’s allegedly autochthonous Etruscan origins, rather than claim any direct ancestral lineage from Ancient Rome. In making this historiographical shift, the writers strove to distance Florence–both ideologically and historically–from Roman influence, provide historical precedent for the aristocratic governing structure, and present an ancient justification for a Florentine-led Tuscan imperial league. Yet, for Florentines to associate themselves with Etruscans also meant identifying themselves, quite undeniably, as losers in the ancient struggle against Rome. Niccolo Machiavelli, recognizing the political precarity of relying on the Etruscan example, attempts to dismiss the humanist claims to an ancient Florentine exceptionalism. In this refusal to romanticize the “ancient Tuscans,” Machiavelli challenges the historiographical assumption prevailing at the time that past glory and ancestral heritage necessarily determine the political trajectory of a regime. The changing status of the Etruscan foundation myth, then, not only makes manifest the frantic search for identity and turbulent political landscape of Renaissance Florence, but also offers important insight on how humanists mobilized, or evaded, history for the advancement of their political agendas and collective goals.

  • Publication . Article . 2010
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Beppe Cavatorta;
    Publisher: California Digital Library (CDL)
    Country: United States

    This article explores the legacy left by Futurism to the Neo-avant-garde and dismantles the wall erected by the neo-avant-gardists to separate themself form Marinetti's movement.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Carmen M. Gomez;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    “I nostri nervi disprezzano la donna,” writes F.T. Marinetti in Uccidiamo il chiaro della luna!, “poiche noi temiamo che braccia supplici si intreccino alle nostre ginocchia la mattina della partenza!” 1 Marinetti’s intriguing exclamation, appearing in similar forms in several fundamental Futurist texts, proffers, in a single declaration, a complex nexus of gender and sex relations, politics, and aesthetics, denouncing at once woman, the moon and all of their allegorical, philosophical, and aesthetic associates: cyclical time, along with tangential notions of creation and death, and, more importantly, a female symbolic traditionally linked to love, reproduction, and beauty. Symbolic woman, here and in other Futurist manifestos, poetry, and prose is denigrated for her indelible materiality, inertia, and immobility. Marinetti and his disciples lead a metaphorical campaign against the feminine throughout the Futurist literary production, connecting the heroic Futurism of the prewar period to the second Futurism after 1918. The explicit misogyny inscribed in Marinetti’s early work and throughout the subsequent Futurist movement, however, results as one of Futurism’s greatest enigmas: while Futurism forcefully vilified all things feminine, the artistic, intellectual, and inherently political movement provided a unique opportunity for the modern woman to re-evaluate her own social, symbolic roles in the abandonment of a sexualized, corporeal female form, and redefine her intellectual and creative capacities, which had been traditionally relegated to the maternal. Of interest in this study is the effect Futurism’s “paradoxical feminism,” marked by the abandonment of some and reappropriation of other conventionally feminine qualities and aesthetics, had on women’s creative expression. 2 Departing from Marinetti’s earlier literature and Valentine de Saint-Point’s identification of the Futurist woman, I will examine the complex relationships drawn between material reality,