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17 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Open Access
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Koen Torremans; Philippe Muchez; Manuel Sintubin;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications
    Country: Belgium

    A structural analysis has been carried out along the south-east margin of the Chambishi–Nkana Basin in the Central African Copperbelt, hosting the world-class copper and cobalt (Cu–Co) Nkana orebody. The geometrically complex structural architecture is interpreted to have been generated during a single NE–SW-oriented compressional event, clearly linked to the Pan-African Lufilian orogeny. This progressive deformation resulted primarily in asymmetric multiscale parasitic fold assemblages, characterised by non-cylindrical NW–SE-oriented periclinal folds that strongly interfere laterally, leading to fold linkage and bifurcation. The vergence and amplitude of these folds consistently reflect their position along an inclined limb of a NW-plunging megascale first-order fold. A clear relation is observed between the intensity of parasitic folding and the degree of shale content in the Copperbelt Orebody Member (COM), which hosts most of the ore. Differences in fold amplitude, wavelength and shape are explained by changes in mechanical stratigraphy caused by lateral lithofacies variation in ore-bearing horizons. In addition, strong differences in strain partitioning occur within the deforming basin, which is interpreted to be in part controlled by changes in mechanical anisotropy in the layered rock package. This work provides an essential backdrop to understand the influence of the Lufilian orogeny on metal mineralisation and (re-)mobilisation in the Copperbelt. ispartof: Solid Earth vol:9 issue:4 pages:1011-1033 status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Xiaofei Yang; Collaps;
    Country: Belgium

    The combination of high-resolution laser spectroscopy techniques and radioactive ion beams has provided major input for nuclear physics studies in different regions of the nuclear chart by accessing nuclear intrinsic properties, such as spins, magnetic and quadrupole moments and charge radii of exotic nuclei. As more and more exotic radioactive beams become available, laser spectroscopy and its relevant techniques start to be renascent with many advanced experimental setups being established and planned at radioactive-beam facilities world-wide. Meanwhile, a further exploration to expand the laser spectroscopy of radioactive beams into not only nuclear physics but also multiple interdisciplinary fields is being in progress. In this contribution, by using the relevant laser spectroscopy setups at ISOLDE as examples, the details of high precision laser spectroscopy experimental techniques applied to radioactive beams will be presented, together with a few highlights and achievements during the past years.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2011
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wim De Smet; Jie Tang; Marie-Francine Moens;
    Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
    Country: Belgium

    This paper explores bridging the content of two different languages via latent topics. Specifically, we propose a unified probabilistic model to simultaneously model latent topics from bilingual corpora that discuss comparable content and use the topics as features in a cross-lingual, dictionary-less text categorization task. Experimental results on multilingual Wikipedia data show that the proposed topic model effectively discovers the topic information from the bilingual corpora, and the learned topics successfully transfer classification knowledge to other languages, for which no labeled training data are available. Book subtitle: 15TH PACIFIC-ASIA CONFERENCE, PAKDD 2011 ispartof: pages:549-560 ispartof: Lecture Notes in Computer Science vol:6634 issue:PART 1 pages:549-560 ispartof: PAKDD2011: the 15th Pacific-Asia conference on knowledge discovery and data mining location:PEOPLES R CHINA, Shenzhen date:24 May - 27 May 2011 status: published

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zhichao Xia; Cheng Wang; Roeland Hancock; Maaike Vandermosten; Fumiko Hoeft;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Countries: Belgium, United States

    Abstract The importance of (inherited) genetic impact in reading development is well established. De novo mutation is another important contributor that is recently gathering interest as a major liability of neurodevelopmental disorders, but has been neglected in reading research to date. Paternal age at childbirth (PatAGE) is known as the most prominent risk factor for de novo mutation, which has been repeatedly shown by molecular genetic studies. As one of the first efforts, we performed a preliminary investigation of the relationship between PatAGE, offspring's reading, and brain structure in a longitudinal neuroimaging study following 51 children from kindergarten through third grade. The results showed that greater PatAGE was significantly associated with worse reading, explaining an additional 9.5% of the variance after controlling for a number of confounds—including familial factors and cognitive‐linguistic reading precursors. Moreover, this effect was mediated by volumetric maturation of the left posterior thalamus from ages 5 to 8. Complementary analyses indicated the PatAGE‐related thalamic region was most likely located in the pulvinar nuclei and related to the dorsal attention network by using brain atlases, public datasets, and offspring's diffusion imaging data. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into neurocognitive mechanisms underlying the PatAGE effect on reading acquisition during its earliest phase and suggest promising areas of future research. In the present study, Xia et al. demonstrate that advanced paternal age at childbirth (PatAGE) is negatively associated with offspring's reading. Moreover, this association is mediated by neuroanatomical maturation in the left posterior thalamus, which is closely linked with the dorsal attention network. These findings suggest a novel pathway through which parents affects their offspring's reading ability and suggest future avenues of research on PatAGE‐related factors, such as de novo mutation, in reading.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lingling Bi; Dominique Vanneste; Jan van der Borg;
    Countries: Italy, Belgium

    The People's Republic of China has experienced great economic, political and socio-cultural changes since its founding in 1949, which in turn have considerably impacted every aspect of the Chinese society. Adopting a regime perspective, the paper discusses China's tourism development against these backdrops, with an aim to disentangle the relation between tourism development and the broader context. In the light of the heritage-tourism-urban development strategy today, a special attention is given to tourism's (non)interaction with heritage and urban development, to examine the impact of the (lack of) internal dynamics on their development paths. In its attempt to answer the questions of 'why' and 'what' in China's tourism development, the paper aims to provide a panoramic view of the topic and the unique dialogism among tourism development, heritage conservation and urban development that underlines the appropriation and practice of tourism and heritage in contemporary China.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Angela Schottenhammer;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | TRANSPACIFIC (833143)

    At least officially, the Chinese government showed little to no interest in the Asia-Pacific region. We also know very little about Chinese state interference except for attempts to fight against piracy in the Southeast Asian waters. This article will consequently address and survey a neglected aspect of China’s maritime history, namely China’s (indirect) relationship with the Viceroyalty of Peru, its capital Lima (= Ciudad de los Reyes), and its port of Callao, and with the ‘silver centre’ in the Spanish Indies—the Villa Imperial (= Potosí), in the hinterlands of the Viceroyalty of Peru. These active, but at first sight less obvious and frequently neglected parts of the trans-Pacific trade, I would like to call ‘the other New World’. The article introduces a variety of micro-historical bottom-up insights into connections between two places that at first sight seem related to each other only through the shipments of huge quantities of silver from the Cerro Rico in Potosí via Acapulco and Manila to China, in exchange for Chinese silks and porcelains, looking specifically at some micro networks, contraband, informal, accidental, and undesired exchanges. It offers preliminary results and a general framework and survey of trade connections, routes and information on the variety of Chinese products that reached Peru. ispartof: The Medieval History Journal vol:23 issue:2 pages:1-59 status: published

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Omer Onur Cakir; Fabio Castiglione; Z. Tandogdu; Justin W. Collins; Hussain M. Alnajjar; Clare Akers; Maarten Albersen; Constantine Alifrangis; B. Ayres; Oscar R. Brouwer; +16 more
    Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
    Country: Belgium

    Objectives To develop an international consensus on managing penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 acute waves. A major concern for patients with penile cancer during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is how the enforced safety measures will affect their disease management. Delays in diagnosis and treatment initiation may have an impact on the extent of the primary lesion as well as the cancer-specific survival because of the development and progression of inguinal lymph node metastases. Materials and methods A review of the COVID-19 literature was conducted in conjunction with analysis of current international guidelines on the management of penile cancer. Results were presented to an international panel of experts on penile cancer and infection control by a virtual accelerated Delphi process using 4 survey rounds. Consensus opinion was defined as an agreement of ≥80%, which was used to reconfigure management pathways for penile cancer. Results Limited evidence is available for delaying penile cancer management. The consensus rate of agreement was 100% that penile cancer pathways should be reconfigured, and measures should be developed to prevent perioperative nosocomial transmission of COVID-19. The panel also reached a consensus on several statements aimed at reconfiguring the management of penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions The international consensus panel proposed a framework for the diagnostic and invasive therapeutic procedures for penile cancer within a low-risk environment for COVID-19. Highlights • In response to the dramatic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care pathways and delivery, including delays in management of aggressive cancers, an international expert panel was convened to address the management pathways for patients with penile cancer. • This study reports the statements developed by the panel to reconfigure the management pathways for penile cancer patients during the COVID-19 acute waves. • The adaptation of the EAU and NCCN penile cancer guidelines for use in the setting of COVID-19 acute waves was guided mainly by 2 necessities: To minimize the numbers of hospital visits and hospitalization and to prevent COVID-19-related complications attributed to cancer treatment • A consensus was reached regarding multiple items related to the diagnosis and management of penile cancer throughout the COVID-19 acute waves. • Non-urgent procedures should be postponed and non-invasive procedures should be encouraged to delay or avoid the need for procedures that require general anesthesia because of the morbidity associated with perioperative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Comas-Bru, Laia; Harrison, Sandy P.; Werner, Martin; Rehfeld, Kira; Scroxton, Nick; C. Veiga-Pires, C.; Ahmad, Syed Masood; Brahim, Yassine Ait; Mozhdehi, Sahar Amirnezhad; Arienzo, Monica; +78 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden, Sweden, Belgium, Portugal, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, Italy, Germany ...
    Project: FCT | UID/MAR/00350/2013 (UID/MAR/00350/2013), EC | GC2.0 (694481), FCT | UID/MAR/00350/2013 (UID/MAR/00350/2013), EC | GC2.0 (694481)

    Although quantitative isotope data from speleothems has been used to evaluate isotope-enabled model simulations, currently no consensus exists regarding the most appropriate methodology through which to achieve this. A number of modelling groups will be running isotope-enabled palaeoclimate simulations in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6, so it is timely to evaluate different approaches to using the speleothem data for data-model comparisons. Here, we illustrate this using 456 globally distributed speleothem delta O-18 records from an updated version of the Speleothem Isotopes Synthesis and Analysis (SISAL) database and palaeoclimate simulations generated using the ECHAM5-wiso isotope-enabled atmospheric circulation model. We show that the SISAL records reproduce the first-order spatial patterns of isotopic variability in the modern day, strongly supporting the application of this dataset for evaluating model-derived isotope variability into the past. However, the discontinuous nature of many speleothem records complicates the process of procuring large numbers of records if data-model comparisons are made using the traditional approach of comparing anomalies between a control period and a given palaeoclimate experiment. To circumvent this issue, we illustrate techniques through which the absolute isotope values during any time period could be used for model evaluation. Specifically, we show that speleothem isotope records allow an assessment of a model's ability to simulate spatial isotopic trends. Our analyses provide a protocol for using speleothem isotope data for model evaluation, including screening the observations to take into account the impact of speleothem mineralogy on delta O-18 values, the optimum period for the modern observational baseline and the selection of an appropriate time window for creating means of the isotope data for palaeo-time-slices. European Geosciences Union - W2017/413; Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences (iCRAG); European Association of Geochemistry (Early Career Ambassadors program 2017); Quaternary Research Association UK; Navarino Environmental Observatory, Stockholm University; University College Dublin, Savillex (UK) - SF1428; Ibn Zohr University, Morocco; University of Reading; European Research Council - 694481; Natural Environment Research Council (JPI-Belmont project "PAleao-Constraints on Monsoon Evolution and Dynamics (PACMEDY)"); Geological Survey Ireland - 2017-SC-056; Royal Irish Academy; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - RE3994/2-1; Past Global Changes (PAGES) programme; info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Theo D'haen;
    Publisher: Project Muse
    Country: Belgium

    "I will focus on Edward Said’s handling of the work of the British geographer Halford Mackinder...in Culture and Imperialism.... In 1904, Mackinder published an influential paper in The Geographical Journal...in which he labelled all of European and Asian Russia and much of Central Asia, then also under Russian rule, as 'The Geographical Pivot of History.' Mackinder’s views represented what we would now, following Heidegger’s coining of the term, and especially the use Said himself and Gayatri Spivak have made of it, call a 'worlding' of the world according to the dictates of colonialism and imperialism prevalent at the time. My argument will be that Said’s reading of Mackinder likewise amounts to a specific worlding for a specific moment in time, and that perhaps now we should move on from there."

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bin Ni; Bingqing Xu; Yicheng Ni;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Belgium

    The August this year marks the 75th anniversary of the ending of World War II (WWII), which is the largest and most destructive war in modern world history, with an estimated 80 million people or a...