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119 Research products, page 5 of 12

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Other research products
  • English
  • Oxford University Research Archive

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  • English
    Authors: 
    Peter Thompson;
    Country: United Kingdom
  • English
    Authors: 
    Felicity Heal;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Translating the Scriptures into the vernacular was a primary concern of Protestant reformers. This led to worries about the precise language-form in which they should be made accessibly to lay folk. This article situates such evangelical debates within contemporary understanding of the nature and role of native tongues. Tudor and Stuart governments sometimes saw English as a tool of political control; humanists questioned the 'copiousness' of the vernacular; the Celtic tongues were readily identified with barbarity; the status of the written word might be contaminated by the use of dialect. Translators and authors sought to address these concerns, with great success in England, Lowland Scotland and Wales, but much less effectively in Gaelic-speaking Ireland and Scotland.

  • English
    Authors: 
    James E. Patrick;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Reflecting the ambiguity of the title, this paper focuses first on some contemporary views about the existence of history writing in ancient Israel, and then on how ancient Israelite use of the concept of the 'present' may actually shed light on what they thought about history. In the first half, therefore, secular rationalism, archaeology, and, in our own 'preesnt moment', postmodern interests in ideology, are seen to have influenced scholarly assessment of the historiographical nature of Old Testament narratives. In the second half, after a brief overview of the centrality of past events for ancient Israelites, their idea of 'history' is presented as the combination of collective memory, anticipation of promise fulfilment, and personal participation in the divine convenant established with past generations. Finally, the paper explores various possible explanations for the common and widespread biblical phrase "until this day", apparently linking the past with the historian's own present moment.

  • Other research product . 2011
    English
    Authors: 
    Jason Eric Birch;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This essay was prompted by the question of how Haṭhayoga, literally 'the Yoga of force', acquired its name. Many Indian and Western scholars have understood the 'force' of Haṭhayoga to refer to the effort required to practice it. Inherent in this understanding is the assumption that Haṭhayoga techniques such as prāṇāyāma (breath control) are strenuous and may even cause pain. Others eschew the notion of force altogether and favor the so-called 'esoteric' definition of Haṭhayoga (i.e, the union of the sun (ha) and moon (ṭha) in the body). This essay examines these interpretations in light of definitions of haṭhayoga and the adverbial uses of haṭha (i.e, haṭhāt, haṭhena) in Sanskrit Yoga texts that predate the fifteenth-century Haṭhapradīpikā.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Ian W. Archer;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This article seeks to establish the burden of direct taxation in the city of London in the sixteenth century. Previous discussions have been confined to the yield of parliamentary subsidies which cannot give a full picture because of the way responsibility for equipping military levies was increasingly devolved on to the locality. Estimates of the costs of the various additional military levies are therefore made. Innovations in parliamentary taxation enabled the crown to levy extraordinary sums in the 1540s, but they required a level of intervention by the privy council which Elizabeth's government was not prepared to make. The subsidy performed especially badly in London in the later sixteenth century. Local military rates compensated to some extent, but tax levels in real terms were very much lower in the 1590s than the 1540s. Nevertheless taxation was becoming increasingly regressive, which helps to explain the greater level of complaint in the 1590s.

  • Other research product
    English
    Authors: 
    Sebastian N Page;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Review essay, "American Nineteenth Century History", March 2010

  • English
    Authors: 
    Brian Young;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This essay argues, following an insight of Burckhardt, that the philosophy of history is a 'centaur', and that is has a tendency to hinder rather than to encourage the practice of history. It challenges many of the presuppositions of Bevir's study, demonstrating that The Logic of the History of Ideas is not, in any meaningful sense, an historically minded work. The 'logic' of the essay looks to the arts, especially literature and music, as providing genuinely illuminating parallels to the discipline involved in the practice of intellectual history. History cannot be understood as a process of philosophical abstraction; pertinent examples are of its essence, and plurality is therefore central to its richly textured nature. It still has much to learn from the reflexive procedures of anthropology. By examining the idea of 'tradition' the essay demonstrates that 'the past' is never dead, and that the relationship between texts is a living process: the intellectual historian is him/herself an artist, and his/her task is no less demanding than that of the creative artist, and it is always humblingly provisional.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Guido Bonsaver;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This article tackles the issue of literary censorship in Fascist Italy. The first part offers an outline of the organization and the practices with which the regime attempted to control publishers and authors. It tracks the development of Mussolini's Press Office into a fully fledged ministry, examines the introduction of a semi-preventive form of censorship, and looks at the effects of the anti-Semitic laws. The second part concentrates on the literary activities of the novelist, editor and translator, Elio Vittorini. His many encounters with Fascist censorship provide ideal subject matter for a close examination of how censorship affected literary production. It also provides an example of the need to re-address aspects of Italy's literary history during the Fascist period, particularly in relation to questions of coercive and consensual collaboration with the regime.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Kathryn Gleadle;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This article addresses the historiographical neglect of tory women in the early Victorian period. The existence of a vibrant culture of female conservative letters, combined with the widespread participation of women in ultra-Protestant pressure-group politics, is suggestive of the neglected contribution women made to the revival of grass-roots toryism during these years. In particular, it is suggested that a consideration of the distinctive features of premillenarian Evangelicalism enables a more discriminating approach to the impact of Evangelicalism upon contemporary women. By focusing upon the career of the prominent premillenarian Charlotte Elizabeth Tonna, and her editorship of the Christian Lady's Magazine, it is argued that contemporary attitudes towards 'female politicians' were far more flexible, variable, and contingent than is frequently assumed. The associational activities with which many premillenarians were involved, combined with their attention to Old Testament models of publicly active women and the sense of urgency that distinguished their theology, frequently led its adherents to problematize and critique existing formulations of women's roles.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Pietro Corsi;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Lack of consideration of the complex European scientific scene from the late 18th century to the mid-decades of the 19th century has produced partial and often biased reconstructions of priorities, worries, implicit and explicit philosophical and at times political agendas characterizing the early debates on species. It is the purpose of this paper firstly to critically assess some significant attempts at broadening this historiographic horizon concerning the immediate context to Darwin's intellectual enterprise, and to devote the second part to arguing that a multi-faceted European debate on the transformation of life forms had already occurred in Europe around 1800. Of this debate, contrary to long cherished views, Lamarck's was only one voice, amongst many. Naturalists active in different national contexts elaborated solutions and proposed doctrines that shared several viewpoints, yet clearly stemmed from a variety of disciplinary traditions and problematic contexts.