Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
143 Research products (1 rule applied)

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • CESSDA Data Catalogue

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Authors: Murray, S., Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences;

    Main Topics:The data consist of a partial transcription of the 1851 and 1891 census enumerators' books for Downham, Cambridgeshire. The variables are: enumeration district; folio number; schedule number; address; surname; relationship to head of household; marital status; gender; age; occupation; employment status (1891 only); place of birth; birth county or country; disabilities (1891 only). Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The aim of this project was to investigate the working population of Downham, an agricultural fen parish in north Cambridgeshire, using information derived from the census enumerators' books for 1851 and 1891. This project originated as part of the course of study for Open University Course DA301 (Studying family and community history: nineteenth and twentieth centuries).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Spicksley, J., University of Hull, Department of History; Shepard, A., University of Cambridge, Faculty of History;

    Main Topics:A dataset has been compiled by extracting data from series of depositions taken within a range of jurisdictions adopting a civil law procedure between the mid-sixteenth and mid-eighteenth centuries. It comprises 13,686 statements of worth, provided by 13,012 witnesses, along with related (and often extensive) biographical material. Worth statements were required of most witnesses appearing in many such jurisdictions between the 1550s and 1640s, and of smaller proportions of witnesses thereafter. They were given in response to an interrogatory designed to evaluate witness credibility that asked witnesses for an account of their worth in goods with all debts paid. Data has been selected from the dioceses of Ely, Canterbury, Chester, Chichester (mostly covering the Archdeaconry of Lewes), London, Salisbury and York, and from the Cambridge University Courts. Constructed as a flat file Microsoft Access database, information relating to 48 variables has been entered in conjunction with each worth statement given by a witness. These variables include details of the jurisdiction, repository, and full MS reference numbers for each worth statement; the cause type and names of the litigants; the number of interrogatories posed to each witness and the place of the worth question within them; the date of the witness appearance; and details of any expenses received or expected to cover the cost of that appearance. Each witness response to the question of his/her worth has been transcribed in full, along with the following biographical details: age, gender, marital status, title/addition, office, occupation, parish and county of residence, migration history, place of birth, literacy status (whether the deposition was verified by a witness signature or a mark), and any further incidental biographical details relating to work, wages, credit relations, landholding, rental and tenancy agreements, rate and tax paying status, dependence on charity or formal parish relief, or religious observance. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.This project has sought to recover and analyse new data relating to the distribution of wealth and the language of social description in England between c.1550 and c.1750. A database has been compiled of 13,686 responses of witnesses in the church courts to the commonly asked question of what they were worth with their debts paid. Witnesses responses to the question of their worth often included monetary estimates of material worth, alongside details about how they made a living, together with more qualitative forms of evaluation in ethical terms of honesty and industriousness. This data will underpin analysis of the distribution of wealth and poverty by socio/occupational status, age and gender amongst a broad social range of witnesses during a period of profound economic and social change. Particular attention will be given to the nature and pace of economic change; to the relationship between wealth, status and the life-cycle; to the impact of social polarisation deemed characteristic of the periods history; and to the degree to which an incipient labouring class can be discerned. In addition, the terms in which witnesses described their own (and sometimes each others) worth will be explored in order to chart popular concepts of wealth and poverty, perceptions of social difference, and forms of self-esteem that were often far removed from formal classificatory schemes of the early modern social order. Finally, the wider cultural significance of monetary markers of wealth will be probed in order to situate commonly cited values (such as forty shillings and 10) within qualitative as well as quantitative frames of reference. The data also contains extensive information about the literacy status and migration histories of witnesses, and incidental details of their religious observance.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. For Taking Part, 2018-2019, also known as Year 14 of the continuous survey, 8,161 adults and 645 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 999 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). This study is subject to restrictive Special Licence (SL) access conditions as it contains additional detailed geographic variables (ACORN Group; ONS Urban-Rural Classification). The End User Licence (EUL) version which does not contain these detailed variables, is available under SN 8631. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions; prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version.This study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. For Taking Part, 2018-2019, also known as Year 14 of the continuous survey, 8,161 adults and 645 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 999 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in-home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). In order to preserve confidentiality, variables relating to the census output area, postcode sector, local authority, and primary sampling units have been removed from the UK Data Archive End User Licence version. A Special Licence version that contains more detailed data, including some of the variables listed above and detailed geographical variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban-Rural Classification), is available under SN 8630.This study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the Gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.This study is subject to restrictive Special Licence (SL) access conditions as it contains additional detailed geographic variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban Rural Classification). The End User Licence (EUL) version which does not contain these detailed variables, is available under SN 8442. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions; prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics:Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets, when available. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset.In order to preserve confidentiality, variables relating to census output area, postcode sector, local authority, and primary sampling units have been removed from the UK Data Archive End User Licence version. A Special Licence version that contains more detailed data, including some of the variables listed above and detailed geographical variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban Rural Classification), is available at SN 8446. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.For Taking Part, 2017-2018, also known as Year 13 of the continuous survey, 7,715 adults and 671 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 909 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI).The study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets. The longitudinal data files will be included, when available.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the Gov.uk Taking Part web pages.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Clarkson, L. A., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Crawford, E. Margaret, Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Kennedy, L., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Dowling, M. W., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History;

    Main Topics:The main tables are: Total number of unmarried, married and widowed people grouped by counties, age groups and gender. Total number of unmarried, married and widowed people grouped by poor law unions, age groups and gender (1871-1911). Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The purpose of the project was to provide machine-readable economic and social history statistics relating to the whole of Ireland for the period 1821-1971. Further information about the project is available on the QUB Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis website.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Southall, H. R., University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Department of Geography;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. Main Topics:Registration District Marriage Statistics 1841- 1870. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Kirkman, K., Pinner Local History Society;

    Main Topics: The data comprise one record for each individual with information as follows: year and schedule; address; surname; forename/s; relationship to head code; marital status; sex; age; code for occupation (Booth-Armstrong); occupation name; birthplace; birth county. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.In order to facilitate the study of local history the Pinner Local History Society have transcribed the enumerators' books for Pinner for the census years 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1891.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Southall, H. R., University of Portsmouth, School of the Environment, Geography and Geosciences;

    The British census reports generally cross-tabulated age against marital status as well as gender, but the transcriptions in the Great Britain Historical Database are generally limited to age and gender, enabling the construction of population pyramids. This dataset is a quite separate transcription limited to marital status, or "conjugal condition", and gender, held only for Scotland in 1931.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (August 2022), the data and documentation files were replaced with updated versions. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. Conjugal Condition at county and burgh level for Scotland in 1931. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Main Topics:

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
143 Research products (1 rule applied)
  • Authors: Murray, S., Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences;

    Main Topics:The data consist of a partial transcription of the 1851 and 1891 census enumerators' books for Downham, Cambridgeshire. The variables are: enumeration district; folio number; schedule number; address; surname; relationship to head of household; marital status; gender; age; occupation; employment status (1891 only); place of birth; birth county or country; disabilities (1891 only). Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The aim of this project was to investigate the working population of Downham, an agricultural fen parish in north Cambridgeshire, using information derived from the census enumerators' books for 1851 and 1891. This project originated as part of the course of study for Open University Course DA301 (Studying family and community history: nineteenth and twentieth centuries).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Spicksley, J., University of Hull, Department of History; Shepard, A., University of Cambridge, Faculty of History;

    Main Topics:A dataset has been compiled by extracting data from series of depositions taken within a range of jurisdictions adopting a civil law procedure between the mid-sixteenth and mid-eighteenth centuries. It comprises 13,686 statements of worth, provided by 13,012 witnesses, along with related (and often extensive) biographical material. Worth statements were required of most witnesses appearing in many such jurisdictions between the 1550s and 1640s, and of smaller proportions of witnesses thereafter. They were given in response to an interrogatory designed to evaluate witness credibility that asked witnesses for an account of their worth in goods with all debts paid. Data has been selected from the dioceses of Ely, Canterbury, Chester, Chichester (mostly covering the Archdeaconry of Lewes), London, Salisbury and York, and from the Cambridge University Courts. Constructed as a flat file Microsoft Access database, information relating to 48 variables has been entered in conjunction with each worth statement given by a witness. These variables include details of the jurisdiction, repository, and full MS reference numbers for each worth statement; the cause type and names of the litigants; the number of interrogatories posed to each witness and the place of the worth question within them; the date of the witness appearance; and details of any expenses received or expected to cover the cost of that appearance. Each witness response to the question of his/her worth has been transcribed in full, along with the following biographical details: age, gender, marital status, title/addition, office, occupation, parish and county of residence, migration history, place of birth, literacy status (whether the deposition was verified by a witness signature or a mark), and any further incidental biographical details relating to work, wages, credit relations, landholding, rental and tenancy agreements, rate and tax paying status, dependence on charity or formal parish relief, or religious observance. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.This project has sought to recover and analyse new data relating to the distribution of wealth and the language of social description in England between c.1550 and c.1750. A database has been compiled of 13,686 responses of witnesses in the church courts to the commonly asked question of what they were worth with their debts paid. Witnesses responses to the question of their worth often included monetary estimates of material worth, alongside details about how they made a living, together with more qualitative forms of evaluation in ethical terms of honesty and industriousness. This data will underpin analysis of the distribution of wealth and poverty by socio/occupational status, age and gender amongst a broad social range of witnesses during a period of profound economic and social change. Particular attention will be given to the nature and pace of economic change; to the relationship between wealth, status and the life-cycle; to the impact of social polarisation deemed characteristic of the periods history; and to the degree to which an incipient labouring class can be discerned. In addition, the terms in which witnesses described their own (and sometimes each others) worth will be explored in order to chart popular concepts of wealth and poverty, perceptions of social difference, and forms of self-esteem that were often far removed from formal classificatory schemes of the early modern social order. Finally, the wider cultural significance of monetary markers of wealth will be probed in order to situate commonly cited values (such as forty shillings and 10) within qualitative as well as quantitative frames of reference. The data also contains extensive information about the literacy status and migration histories of witnesses, and incidental details of their religious observance.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. For Taking Part, 2018-2019, also known as Year 14 of the continuous survey, 8,161 adults and 645 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 999 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). This study is subject to restrictive Special Licence (SL) access conditions as it contains additional detailed geographic variables (ACORN Group; ONS Urban-Rural Classification). The End User Licence (EUL) version which does not contain these detailed variables, is available under SN 8631. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions; prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version.This study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. For Taking Part, 2018-2019, also known as Year 14 of the continuous survey, 8,161 adults and 645 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 999 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in-home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). In order to preserve confidentiality, variables relating to the census output area, postcode sector, local authority, and primary sampling units have been removed from the UK Data Archive End User Licence version. A Special Licence version that contains more detailed data, including some of the variables listed above and detailed geographical variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban-Rural Classification), is available under SN 8630.This study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the Gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.This study is subject to restrictive Special Licence (SL) access conditions as it contains additional detailed geographic variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban Rural Classification). The End User Licence (EUL) version which does not contain these detailed variables, is available under SN 8442. Users are advised to first obtain the standard EUL version of the data to see if they are sufficient for their research requirements. The SL data have more restrictive access conditions; prospective users of the SL version will need to complete an extra application form and demonstrate to the data owners exactly why they need access to the additional variables in order to get permission to use that version.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the gov.uk Taking Part web pages. Main Topics:Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset (although children aged 11-15 are asked about their level of happiness).

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Department for Culture, Media and Sport;

    Main Topics: Main topics covered by the survey include: the arts, museums and galleries, libraries, archives, heritage, sport, volunteering, charitable giving, general free time activities, digital activities, special events (currently the First World War commemorations), community participation, personal well-being and demographics. Almost all of these topics appear in the main adult and child data sets, and in the longitudinal data sets, when available. First World War and personal well-being are not covered in the child dataset.In order to preserve confidentiality, variables relating to census output area, postcode sector, local authority, and primary sampling units have been removed from the UK Data Archive End User Licence version. A Special Licence version that contains more detailed data, including some of the variables listed above and detailed geographical variables (ACORN Group and ONS Urban Rural Classification), is available at SN 8446. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.For Taking Part, 2017-2018, also known as Year 13 of the continuous survey, 7,715 adults and 671 children aged 11-15 were interviewed. Information was also collected from parents or guardians of 909 children aged 5-10. Interviews were conducted face-to-face in home by specially trained interviewers working on behalf of NatCen and Ipsos MORI using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI).The study currently includes only the annual adult and child datasets. The longitudinal data files will be included, when available.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (April 2021) new versions of the face-to-face cross sectional survey adult and child data were deposited, with errors in a small number of variables corrected. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Taking Part survey collects data on many aspects of leisure, culture and sport in England, as well as an in-depth range of socio-demographic information on respondents. The survey is commissioned by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) in partnership with three of its non-departmental public bodies (Sport England, Arts Council England and English Heritage). The survey was first commissioned in 2005 as a face-to-face household survey of adults (16+) in England. Since then it has run annually and has also been developed to include further elements, including a child element and a longitudinal element. Further information can be found on the Gov.uk Taking Part web pages.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Clarkson, L. A., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Crawford, E. Margaret, Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Kennedy, L., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History; Dowling, M. W., Queen's University of Belfast, Department of Economic and Social History;

    Main Topics:The main tables are: Total number of unmarried, married and widowed people grouped by counties, age groups and gender. Total number of unmarried, married and widowed people grouped by poor law unions, age groups and gender (1871-1911). Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The purpose of the project was to provide machine-readable economic and social history statistics relating to the whole of Ireland for the period 1821-1971. Further information about the project is available on the QUB Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis website.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Southall, H. R., University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Department of Geography;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. Main Topics:Registration District Marriage Statistics 1841- 1870. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Kirkman, K., Pinner Local History Society;

    Main Topics: The data comprise one record for each individual with information as follows: year and schedule; address; surname; forename/s; relationship to head code; marital status; sex; age; code for occupation (Booth-Armstrong); occupation name; birthplace; birth county. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.In order to facilitate the study of local history the Pinner Local History Society have transcribed the enumerators' books for Pinner for the census years 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881 and 1891.

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • Authors: Southall, H. R., University of Portsmouth, School of the Environment, Geography and Geosciences;

    The British census reports generally cross-tabulated age against marital status as well as gender, but the transcriptions in the Great Britain Historical Database are generally limited to age and gender, enabling the construction of population pyramids. This dataset is a quite separate transcription limited to marital status, or "conjugal condition", and gender, held only for Scotland in 1931.Latest edition informationFor the second edition (August 2022), the data and documentation files were replaced with updated versions. Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. Conjugal Condition at county and burgh level for Scotland in 1931. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Main Topics:

    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert