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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • CESSDA

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  • Authors: Dyhouse, C., University of Sussex, School of Cultural and Community Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. This study aimed to explore the ways in which male students calculated the costs and benefits of higher education in England in the 1930s, before the establishment of mandatory grants and awards; together with an analysis of the strategies used for meeting the costs of this investment. It was designed to complement the researcher's earlier study of women graduates of the same period, which was carried out in 1995 with support from the Spencer Foundation in Chicago. Main Topics: A total of 1085 four page questionnaires were distributed to men who had graduated from eight English universities and university colleges before 1939. Respondents were asked to give information about their social background and the ways in which they had met the expense of their years at college. They were also asked about their subsequent careers. A total of 577 completed questionnaires were obtained. This database contains only that material, extracted from the completed questionnaires, which could be effectively anonymised. Entries give information about family of origin and family of destination. They give some indication of reasons for going to university. The bulk of the information relates to family support and type of funding. Main variables: institution, father's occupation, mother's occupation, family of origin size, reasons for going to university, arts or sciences, subject, degree result, extent of family funding, state scholarship, local authority scholarship, board of education grant, school scholarship, university/college scholarship, loans taken out, other sources of support, teaching qualification, place of residence, vacation work, first occupation, other occupations, marital status, number of children, wife's occupation before marriage, wife's employment status after marriage, notes. The original questionnaires remain in the possession of the depositor and access is embargoed. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Volunteer sample Postal survey

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2001
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2001
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Dorling, D., University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Geography; Aucott, P., University of Portsmouth, Department of Geography; Southall, H. R., University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Department of Geography;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. These data were originally collected by the Censuses of Population for England and Wales, and for Scotland. They were computerised by the Great Britain Historical GIS Project and its collaborators. They form part of the Great Britain Historical Database, which contains a wide range of geographically-located statistics, selected to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain, generally at sub-county scales. The first census report to tabulate social class was 1951, but this collection also includes a table from the Registrar-General's 1931 Decennial Supplement which drew on census occupational data to tabulate social class by region. In 1961 and 1971 the census used a more detailed classification of Socio-Economic Groups, from which the five Social Classes are a simplification. This is a new edition. Data from the Census of Scotland have been added for 1951, 1961 and 1971. Wherever possible, ID numbers have been added for counties and districts which match those used in the digital boundary data created by the GBH GIS, greatly simplifying mapping. Main Topics: Social Class Statistics from the 1931 Decennial Supplement for regions. Social Class Statistics from the 1951, 1961 and 1971 Censuses (including Scotland), mainly for men and type of occupation. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Quasi-random (eg random walk) sample No sampling (total universe) Transcription Compilation or synthesis of existing material

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2004
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2004
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Attitudes to age (Module MCX): this module was asked by the Department for Work and Pensions to gather information regarding people’s attitudes towards different age groups in society. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2012
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2012
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University College London, UCL Institute of Education, Centre for Longitudinal Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) is a longitudinal birth cohort study, following a nationally representative sample of over 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Cohort members have been sureveyed throughout their childhood and adult lives, mapping their individual trajectories and creating a unique resource for researchers. It is one of very few longitudinal studies following people of this generation anywhere in the world.Since 1970, cohort members have been surveyed at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42 and 46. Featuring a range of objective measures and rich self-reported data, BCS70 covers an incredible amount of ground and can be used in research on many topics Evidence from BCS70 has illuminated important issues for our society across five decades. Key findings include how reading for pleasure matters for children's cognitive development, why grammar schools have not reduced social inequalities, and how childhood experiences can impact on mental health in mid-life. Every day researchers from across the scientific community are using this important study to make new connections and discoveries.BCS70 is run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), a research centre in the UCL Institute of Education, which is part of University College London. The content of BCS70 studies, including questions, topics and variables can be explored via the CLOSER Discovery website.How to access genetic and/or bio-medical sample data from a range of longitudinal surveys:For information on how to access biomedical data from BCS70 that are not held at the UKDS, see the CLS Genetic data and biological samples webpage.Secure Access datasetsSecure Access versions of BCS70 have more restrictive access conditions than versions available under the standard End User Licence (EUL). Currently, only sensitive variables from the age 46 sweep are available under SN 9115, although sensitive survey data across all sweeps will be made available over time. 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016: Data on work and non-work activities lasting one month or more have been collected in all BCS70 sweeps from sweep 5 (age 26) onwards. The purpose of the study is to merge all data on work and non-work activities in successive BCS sweeps into one longitudinal dataset. This Secure Access study is a restricted-access supplementary dataset to the standard End User Licence (EUL) access study 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016 study (SN 6943), including more detailed SIC and SOC codes for recent sweeps. This study (SN 8787) also includes the EUL files for ease of use. For information on how to make an application for Secure Access data, see the 'Access data' section.International Data Access Network (IDAN)These data are now available to researchers based outside the UK. Selected UKDS SecureLab/controlled datasets from the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) and the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) have been made available under the International Data Access Network (IDAN) scheme, via a Safe Room access point at one of the UKDS IDAN partners. Prospective users should read the UKDS SecureLab application guide for non-ONS data for researchers outside of the UK via Safe Room Remote Desktop Access. Further details about the IDAN scheme can be found on the UKDS International Data Access Network webpage and on the IDAN website. Main Topics: The BCS70 Activity Histories dataset contains one record for each work or non-work activity. No sampling (total universe) Compilation/Synthesis

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2021
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2021
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University College London, UCL Institute of Education, Centre for Longitudinal Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) is a longitudinal birth cohort study, following a nationally representative sample of over 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Cohort members have been sureveyed throughout their childhood and adult lives, mapping their individual trajectories and creating a unique resource for researchers. It is one of very few longitudinal studies following people of this generation anywhere in the world.Since 1970, cohort members have been surveyed at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42 and 46. Featuring a range of objective measures and rich self-reported data, BCS70 covers an incredible amount of ground and can be used in research on many topics Evidence from BCS70 has illuminated important issues for our society across five decades. Key findings include how reading for pleasure matters for children's cognitive development, why grammar schools have not reduced social inequalities, and how childhood experiences can impact on mental health in mid-life. Every day researchers from across the scientific community are using this important study to make new connections and discoveries.BCS70 is run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), a research centre in the UCL Institute of Education, which is part of University College London. The content of BCS70 studies, including questions, topics and variables can be explored via the CLOSER Discovery website.How to access genetic and/or bio-medical sample data from a range of longitudinal surveys:For information on how to access biomedical data from BCS70 that are not held at the UKDS, see the CLS Genetic data and biological samples webpage.Secure Access datasetsSecure Access versions of BCS70 have more restrictive access conditions than versions available under the standard End User Licence (EUL). Currently, only sensitive variables from the age 46 sweep are available under SN 9115, although sensitive survey data across all sweeps will be made available over time. 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016: Data on work and non-work activities lasting one month or more have been collected in all BCS70 sweeps from sweep 5 (age 26) onwards. The purpose of the study is to merge all data on work and non-work activities in successive BCS sweeps into one longitudinal dataset. The focus of the questions asked at each sweep vary between current work activity; work and non-work activities engaged in since the age of 16; work and non-work activities engaged in since the age of 16, over time and between sweeps. Therefore the activity histories will start from the age of 16 and continue until the interview date of the latest data sweep that each cohort member participated in. The length of the activity histories vary depending on the latest sweep that a cohort member was present at. The minimum activity history length recorded is 1 month and the maximum is 387 months (32 years). Gaps in the activity histories occur where a cohort member has not been present at all sweeps and/or where full activity data were not reported. For the fourth edition (March 2021) data reported on activities for Sweep 10 were added to the study. Longitudinal datasets have also been streamlined by removing cases which have never participated in any main sweep survey and are no longer being issued. Further details are included in the documentation, which has also been updated. Main Topics: The BCS70 Activity Histories dataset contains one record for each work or non-work activity. No sampling (total universe) Compilation/Synthesis

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2012
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2012
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for these two month were: Court fees (Module MDP): this module was asked on behalf of the Ministry of Justice which is interested in collecting information about the public’s perception of family and civil justice courts. This module was not asked of Scottish residents. Publications for the Court fees data are available from the ONS Public attitudes to civil and family court fees webpage. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2014
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2014
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Cancer awareness (Module MBR): this module was asked on behalf of Cancer Research UK. The questions are designed to collect data on the public's awareness of cancer and its symptoms. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2016
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2016
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Goose, N. R., University of Hertfordshire, Department of Humanities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. The aim of this project was to analyse population, economy and social and family structure in mid-19th century Hertfordshire, in comparative perspective. The 1851 census was the first to provide details of both county and town or parish of birth of each individual, whilst clearer instructions were provided for the recording of occupations, the work of members of the head's family and for recording details of farm size and agricultural labour force. There is therefore a wealth of economic, social and demographic information contained in the 1851 census, whilst its consistent and highly structured format renders it ideally suited to treatment by database management systems. Main Topics: The dataset includes a full transcription of the Census Enumerators' Books for Berkhamsted Superintendent Registrar's District in Hertfordshire, enhanced with occupational codings. Variables in the dataset include : record number, surname, forename, schedule number, address, relation to head of household, marital status, age, gender, occupation, social status code, Booth/Armstrong occupational code, raw material occupational code, product occupational code, county of birth, place of birth, disabilities, enumeration district, parish/sub-parish unit, date, PRO reference, ages under one year. No sampling (total universe) Transcription of existing materials transcription from xeroxes of original Census Enumerators' Books

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 1999
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 1999
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Bus satisfaction (Module MBA): this module was asked on behalf of the Department for Transport and questions explore respondents’ personal use and thoughts on bus services, based on individual experience. Publications for the Bus satisfaction data are available from the ONS Public attitudes towards buses: March 2013 webpage. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2014
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2014
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University of Manchester, Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research; Office for National Statistics, Census Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. The 2001 Census: Special Licence Household Sample of Anonymised Records (SL-HSAR) dataset comprises Sample of Anonymised Records (SARs) data that relate to 29 April 2001. They were created by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of the 2001 Census of Population. All households were asked to complete a form giving information about the household and all individuals living in the household. Completion of the form was compulsory for the entire population. The Census schedule includes questions on housing and tenure, and demographic and socio-economic information for all household members. The dataset comprises SARs data for 1% of households in England and Wales, including imputed values for households which were not enumerated during the Census. Individual data for households larger than 11 residents have been suppressed. To protect confidentiality, age data have been grouped into 2-year bands and there is no geographical breakdown available. A small amount of perturbation has been applied to the data to protect confidentiality. As with the Individual Licensed SAR (see under SNs 7210 and 7211), separate variables indicate whether or not imputation or perturbation has been applied to any given variable for each case in the sample. Documentation, training and user support for these data is undertaken by the SARs team at the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research (CCSR). A further release of data, which contains additional derived variables, will be made available at a later date. The Secure Access version replaces the previous Special Licence version that was held under SN 5278, which is no longer available. Prospective users of the Secure Access data will need to fulfil additional requirements, including completion of face-to-face training and agreement to Secure Access' User Agreement and Breaches Penalties Policy, in order to obtain permission to use that version (see 'Access' section below). Detailed SARs data: A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all ONS sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS; further details can be found on their CAMS web page. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales. Main Topics: A full range of census topics are included in the dataset, for example household structure, ethnicity and religion, housing, transport, employment, education and health and caring. One-stage stratified or systematic random sample Self-completion

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2016
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2016
      Data sources: B2FIND
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,186 Research products (1 rule applied)
  • Authors: Dyhouse, C., University of Sussex, School of Cultural and Community Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. This study aimed to explore the ways in which male students calculated the costs and benefits of higher education in England in the 1930s, before the establishment of mandatory grants and awards; together with an analysis of the strategies used for meeting the costs of this investment. It was designed to complement the researcher's earlier study of women graduates of the same period, which was carried out in 1995 with support from the Spencer Foundation in Chicago. Main Topics: A total of 1085 four page questionnaires were distributed to men who had graduated from eight English universities and university colleges before 1939. Respondents were asked to give information about their social background and the ways in which they had met the expense of their years at college. They were also asked about their subsequent careers. A total of 577 completed questionnaires were obtained. This database contains only that material, extracted from the completed questionnaires, which could be effectively anonymised. Entries give information about family of origin and family of destination. They give some indication of reasons for going to university. The bulk of the information relates to family support and type of funding. Main variables: institution, father's occupation, mother's occupation, family of origin size, reasons for going to university, arts or sciences, subject, degree result, extent of family funding, state scholarship, local authority scholarship, board of education grant, school scholarship, university/college scholarship, loans taken out, other sources of support, teaching qualification, place of residence, vacation work, first occupation, other occupations, marital status, number of children, wife's occupation before marriage, wife's employment status after marriage, notes. The original questionnaires remain in the possession of the depositor and access is embargoed. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Volunteer sample Postal survey

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2001
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDAarrow_drop_down
      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2001
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Dorling, D., University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Department of Geography; Aucott, P., University of Portsmouth, Department of Geography; Southall, H. R., University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, Department of Geography;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Great Britain Historical Database has been assembled as part of the ongoing Great Britain Historical GIS Project. The project aims to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain at sub-county scales. Further information about the project is available on A Vision of Britain webpages, where users can browse the database's documentation system online. These data were originally collected by the Censuses of Population for England and Wales, and for Scotland. They were computerised by the Great Britain Historical GIS Project and its collaborators. They form part of the Great Britain Historical Database, which contains a wide range of geographically-located statistics, selected to trace the emergence of the north-south divide in Britain and to provide a synoptic view of the human geography of Britain, generally at sub-county scales. The first census report to tabulate social class was 1951, but this collection also includes a table from the Registrar-General's 1931 Decennial Supplement which drew on census occupational data to tabulate social class by region. In 1961 and 1971 the census used a more detailed classification of Socio-Economic Groups, from which the five Social Classes are a simplification. This is a new edition. Data from the Census of Scotland have been added for 1951, 1961 and 1971. Wherever possible, ID numbers have been added for counties and districts which match those used in the digital boundary data created by the GBH GIS, greatly simplifying mapping. Main Topics: Social Class Statistics from the 1931 Decennial Supplement for regions. Social Class Statistics from the 1951, 1961 and 1971 Censuses (including Scotland), mainly for men and type of occupation. Please note: this study does not include information on named individuals and would therefore not be useful for personal family history research. Quasi-random (eg random walk) sample No sampling (total universe) Transcription Compilation or synthesis of existing material

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2004
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2004
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Attitudes to age (Module MCX): this module was asked by the Department for Work and Pensions to gather information regarding people’s attitudes towards different age groups in society. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2012
    Data sources: B2FIND
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    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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      Other ORP type . 2012
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University College London, UCL Institute of Education, Centre for Longitudinal Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) is a longitudinal birth cohort study, following a nationally representative sample of over 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Cohort members have been sureveyed throughout their childhood and adult lives, mapping their individual trajectories and creating a unique resource for researchers. It is one of very few longitudinal studies following people of this generation anywhere in the world.Since 1970, cohort members have been surveyed at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42 and 46. Featuring a range of objective measures and rich self-reported data, BCS70 covers an incredible amount of ground and can be used in research on many topics Evidence from BCS70 has illuminated important issues for our society across five decades. Key findings include how reading for pleasure matters for children's cognitive development, why grammar schools have not reduced social inequalities, and how childhood experiences can impact on mental health in mid-life. Every day researchers from across the scientific community are using this important study to make new connections and discoveries.BCS70 is run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), a research centre in the UCL Institute of Education, which is part of University College London. The content of BCS70 studies, including questions, topics and variables can be explored via the CLOSER Discovery website.How to access genetic and/or bio-medical sample data from a range of longitudinal surveys:For information on how to access biomedical data from BCS70 that are not held at the UKDS, see the CLS Genetic data and biological samples webpage.Secure Access datasetsSecure Access versions of BCS70 have more restrictive access conditions than versions available under the standard End User Licence (EUL). Currently, only sensitive variables from the age 46 sweep are available under SN 9115, although sensitive survey data across all sweeps will be made available over time. 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016: Data on work and non-work activities lasting one month or more have been collected in all BCS70 sweeps from sweep 5 (age 26) onwards. The purpose of the study is to merge all data on work and non-work activities in successive BCS sweeps into one longitudinal dataset. This Secure Access study is a restricted-access supplementary dataset to the standard End User Licence (EUL) access study 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016 study (SN 6943), including more detailed SIC and SOC codes for recent sweeps. This study (SN 8787) also includes the EUL files for ease of use. For information on how to make an application for Secure Access data, see the 'Access data' section.International Data Access Network (IDAN)These data are now available to researchers based outside the UK. Selected UKDS SecureLab/controlled datasets from the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) and the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) have been made available under the International Data Access Network (IDAN) scheme, via a Safe Room access point at one of the UKDS IDAN partners. Prospective users should read the UKDS SecureLab application guide for non-ONS data for researchers outside of the UK via Safe Room Remote Desktop Access. Further details about the IDAN scheme can be found on the UKDS International Data Access Network webpage and on the IDAN website. Main Topics: The BCS70 Activity Histories dataset contains one record for each work or non-work activity. No sampling (total universe) Compilation/Synthesis

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2021
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      Other ORP type . 2021
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University College London, UCL Institute of Education, Centre for Longitudinal Studies;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70) is a longitudinal birth cohort study, following a nationally representative sample of over 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Cohort members have been sureveyed throughout their childhood and adult lives, mapping their individual trajectories and creating a unique resource for researchers. It is one of very few longitudinal studies following people of this generation anywhere in the world.Since 1970, cohort members have been surveyed at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38, 42 and 46. Featuring a range of objective measures and rich self-reported data, BCS70 covers an incredible amount of ground and can be used in research on many topics Evidence from BCS70 has illuminated important issues for our society across five decades. Key findings include how reading for pleasure matters for children's cognitive development, why grammar schools have not reduced social inequalities, and how childhood experiences can impact on mental health in mid-life. Every day researchers from across the scientific community are using this important study to make new connections and discoveries.BCS70 is run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS), a research centre in the UCL Institute of Education, which is part of University College London. The content of BCS70 studies, including questions, topics and variables can be explored via the CLOSER Discovery website.How to access genetic and/or bio-medical sample data from a range of longitudinal surveys:For information on how to access biomedical data from BCS70 that are not held at the UKDS, see the CLS Genetic data and biological samples webpage.Secure Access datasetsSecure Access versions of BCS70 have more restrictive access conditions than versions available under the standard End User Licence (EUL). Currently, only sensitive variables from the age 46 sweep are available under SN 9115, although sensitive survey data across all sweeps will be made available over time. 1970 British Cohort Study: Activity Histories, 1986-2016: Data on work and non-work activities lasting one month or more have been collected in all BCS70 sweeps from sweep 5 (age 26) onwards. The purpose of the study is to merge all data on work and non-work activities in successive BCS sweeps into one longitudinal dataset. The focus of the questions asked at each sweep vary between current work activity; work and non-work activities engaged in since the age of 16; work and non-work activities engaged in since the age of 16, over time and between sweeps. Therefore the activity histories will start from the age of 16 and continue until the interview date of the latest data sweep that each cohort member participated in. The length of the activity histories vary depending on the latest sweep that a cohort member was present at. The minimum activity history length recorded is 1 month and the maximum is 387 months (32 years). Gaps in the activity histories occur where a cohort member has not been present at all sweeps and/or where full activity data were not reported. For the fourth edition (March 2021) data reported on activities for Sweep 10 were added to the study. Longitudinal datasets have also been streamlined by removing cases which have never participated in any main sweep survey and are no longer being issued. Further details are included in the documentation, which has also been updated. Main Topics: The BCS70 Activity Histories dataset contains one record for each work or non-work activity. No sampling (total universe) Compilation/Synthesis

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2012
    Data sources: B2FIND
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    popularityAverage
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      Other ORP type . 2012
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for these two month were: Court fees (Module MDP): this module was asked on behalf of the Ministry of Justice which is interested in collecting information about the public’s perception of family and civil justice courts. This module was not asked of Scottish residents. Publications for the Court fees data are available from the ONS Public attitudes to civil and family court fees webpage. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2014
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2014
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Cancer awareness (Module MBR): this module was asked on behalf of Cancer Research UK. The questions are designed to collect data on the public's awareness of cancer and its symptoms. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2016
    Data sources: B2FIND
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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      Other ORP type . 2016
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Goose, N. R., University of Hertfordshire, Department of Humanities;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. The aim of this project was to analyse population, economy and social and family structure in mid-19th century Hertfordshire, in comparative perspective. The 1851 census was the first to provide details of both county and town or parish of birth of each individual, whilst clearer instructions were provided for the recording of occupations, the work of members of the head's family and for recording details of farm size and agricultural labour force. There is therefore a wealth of economic, social and demographic information contained in the 1851 census, whilst its consistent and highly structured format renders it ideally suited to treatment by database management systems. Main Topics: The dataset includes a full transcription of the Census Enumerators' Books for Berkhamsted Superintendent Registrar's District in Hertfordshire, enhanced with occupational codings. Variables in the dataset include : record number, surname, forename, schedule number, address, relation to head of household, marital status, age, gender, occupation, social status code, Booth/Armstrong occupational code, raw material occupational code, product occupational code, county of birth, place of birth, disabilities, enumeration district, parish/sub-parish unit, date, PRO reference, ages under one year. No sampling (total universe) Transcription of existing materials transcription from xeroxes of original Census Enumerators' Books

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 1999
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 1999
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: Office for National Statistics, Social Survey Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner.The Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN) is an omnibus survey that collects data from respondents in Great Britain. Information is gathered on a range of subjects, commissioned both internally by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and by external clients (other government departments, charities, non-profit organisations and academia).One individual respondent, aged 16 or over, is selected from each sampled private household to answer questions. Data are gathered on the respondent, their family, address, household, income and education, plus responses and opinions on a variety of subjects within commissioned modules. Each regular OPN survey consists of two elements. Core questions, covering demographic information, are asked together with non-core questions that vary depending on the module(s) fielded.The OPN collects timely data for research and policy analysis evaluation on the social impacts of recent topics of national importance, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the cost of living. The OPN has expanded to include questions on other topics of national importance, such as health and the cost of living.For more information about the survey and its methodology, see the gov.uk OPN Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) webpage.Changes over timeUp to March 2018, the OPN was conducted as a face-to-face survey. From April 2018 to November 2019, the OPN changed to a mixed-mode design (online first with telephone interviewing where necessary). Mixed-mode collection allows respondents to complete the survey more flexibly and provides a more cost-effective service for module customers.In March 2020, the OPN was adapted to become a weekly survey used to collect data on the social impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on the lives of people of Great Britain. These data are held under Secure Access conditions in SN 8635, ONS Opinions and Lifestyle Survey, Covid-19 Module, 2020-2022: Secure Access. (See below for information on other Secure Access OPN modules.)From August 2021, as coronavirus (COVID-19) restrictions were lifted across Great Britain, the OPN moved to fortnightly data collection, sampling around 5,000 households in each survey wave to ensure the survey remained sustainable. Secure Access OPN modulesBesides SN 8635 (the COVID-19 Module), other Secure Access OPN data includes sensitive modules run at various points from 1997-2019, including Census religion (SN 8078), cervical cancer screening (SN 8080), contact after separation (SN 8089), contraception (SN 8095), disability (SNs 8680 and 8096), general lifestyle (SN 8092), illness and activity (SN 8094), and non-resident parental contact (SN 8093). See the individual studies for further details and information on how to apply to use them. Main Topics: The non-core questions for this month were: Bus satisfaction (Module MBA): this module was asked on behalf of the Department for Transport and questions explore respondents’ personal use and thoughts on bus services, based on individual experience. Publications for the Bus satisfaction data are available from the ONS Public attitudes towards buses: March 2013 webpage. Multi-stage stratified random sample Face-to-face interview

    CESSDAarrow_drop_down
    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2014
    Data sources: B2FIND
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    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
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      Other ORP type . 2014
      Data sources: B2FIND
  • Authors: University of Manchester, Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research; Office for National Statistics, Census Division;

    Abstract copyright UK Data Service and data collection copyright owner. The 2001 Census: Special Licence Household Sample of Anonymised Records (SL-HSAR) dataset comprises Sample of Anonymised Records (SARs) data that relate to 29 April 2001. They were created by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) as part of the 2001 Census of Population. All households were asked to complete a form giving information about the household and all individuals living in the household. Completion of the form was compulsory for the entire population. The Census schedule includes questions on housing and tenure, and demographic and socio-economic information for all household members. The dataset comprises SARs data for 1% of households in England and Wales, including imputed values for households which were not enumerated during the Census. Individual data for households larger than 11 residents have been suppressed. To protect confidentiality, age data have been grouped into 2-year bands and there is no geographical breakdown available. A small amount of perturbation has been applied to the data to protect confidentiality. As with the Individual Licensed SAR (see under SNs 7210 and 7211), separate variables indicate whether or not imputation or perturbation has been applied to any given variable for each case in the sample. Documentation, training and user support for these data is undertaken by the SARs team at the Cathie Marsh Centre for Census and Survey Research (CCSR). A further release of data, which contains additional derived variables, will be made available at a later date. The Secure Access version replaces the previous Special Licence version that was held under SN 5278, which is no longer available. Prospective users of the Secure Access data will need to fulfil additional requirements, including completion of face-to-face training and agreement to Secure Access' User Agreement and Breaches Penalties Policy, in order to obtain permission to use that version (see 'Access' section below). Detailed SARs data: A more detailed version of these data, containing geographical information at the level of Local Authority, is available as a Controlled Access Microdata Sample (CAMS). These can be accessed at all ONS sites. Applications to use these data should be made to ONS; further details can be found on their CAMS web page. The CAMS file includes data for Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as England and Wales. Main Topics: A full range of census topics are included in the dataset, for example household structure, ethnicity and religion, housing, transport, employment, education and health and caring. One-stage stratified or systematic random sample Self-completion

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    CESSDA
    Other ORP type . 2016
    Data sources: B2FIND
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      CESSDA
      Other ORP type . 2016
      Data sources: B2FIND