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367 Research products (1 rule applied)

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  • Population Studies

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  • Authors: Ted A. Telford;

    Age at first marriage is studied in one historical Chinese population reconstituted from the genealogies of 39 lineage groups for the period 1520–1661. By using event-history methods, descriptive measures of age at marriage for various categories of men are generated from fathers' ages at birth of first son as a proxy measure. The covariates of the likelihood of marriage at specific ages are also examined, using Cox's regression analysis. This study confirms an early average age at first marriage of 21–22 years for men, which is comparable to other historical Chinese populations. Some evidence for large proportions of celibate men and marriage in the teens for women in these lineage populations is also presented. Considerable variation in men's age at marriage is evident, primarily accounted for by differences in social status. The study demonstrates the utility of lineage genealogies in Chinese historical demographic studies and shows that the late imperial marriage pattern for this part of China was a ‘...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: E. Hazel Denton;

    Summary In this study possible links between marital union status and fertility are examined using Jamaican census data: in Jamaica a fluid pattern of marital relationships exist, with women in common law and legal marriages and in visiting unions. Examination of the statistics showed (a) that inclusion of union status group does explain some of the fertility variance, and (b) that within each union Status category women respond differently to specific economic variables (such as education and employment). For example, women apparently make choices between earning a living or living with a partner, and the latter may involve motherhood as a means of stabilising and maintaining the union. While consideration of differences in fertility among union status groups has generally focused on the length of the relationship, this exploratory study stresses the importance of looking behind such observations to possible economic causes. It is suggested that where fluid marital arrangements exist, the inclusion of un...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
    Population Studies
    Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Emily Grundy;

    Data from the 1971 and 1981 census records of the OPCS Longitudinal Study (LS) members have been used to examine socio-demographic variations in the proportions of elderly people who lived in private households in 1971, but in institutions ten years later. Information on deaths of sample members 1971–85 has also been used as an indicator of the health status of various sub-groups of the LS population. The results show institutionalization rates to increase with age, to be highest for the single, and lowest for the currently married. Living arrangements in 1971 were also associated with differentials in institutionalization. Regression models which included a family/household variable fitted the data rather less well than models that included a marital-status term. Among men aged 65–74 in 1971, higher social class was associated with lower institutionalization. However, among older men aged 75 and over institutionalization rates were lowest for those from Social Class IIIM. An examination of 1971–81 mortal...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: K. L. Gillion;

    Abstract In this paper the composition of Indian emigration to Fiji is analysed from documentary data. Most emigrants went as indentured labourers from 1879 to 1916. The system of recruitment, the considerable resistances to emigration and pressure stimulating it, places of origin, age, sex, marital status, economic position, religion and caste and expectations of emigrants are considered ; 75% of the emigrants embarked at Calcutta. In the main they were unaccompanied, young men and women, came from the north-eastern United Provinces, and were a fair cross section of village castes. The emigrants were driven primarily by economic but also by social pressure and intended to return to India. Emigration from Madras differed in some respects. Other Indian emigration to Fiji, of Punjabis and Gujratis particularly, is also discussed.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Monique Borgerhoff Mulder;

    The effects of marital status on fertility and offspring survivorship are examined with data on six marriage cohorts of Kipsigis women, agro-pastoralists of south western Kenya. Neither marriage order, nor the average number of co-wives married to a man during a woman's reproductive years, is associated with completed family size, nor with any of the components of reproductive performance. The mechanisms whereby polygyny might potentially lower the reproductive performance of polygynously married women in the Kipsigis and other populations are discussed in some detail, with particular reference to resource shortages, sexual and economic favouritism, the observance of post partum taboos, disease, husband's age, co-wife co-operation, education, sterility, and age at menarche and marriage.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1989 . Peer-reviewed
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    47
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1989 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good; Grant M. Farr; Byron J. Good;

    Summary Studies of the relationship between social status and fertility in developing societies have shown diverse results. This study suggests that such findings result in part from problems in the conceptualization of social stratification and social status. In developing societies such as Iran the differentiation of modern and traditional cultural (and occupational) groups within social classes has resulted in the emergence of a dual hierarchy. Measures of social status must therefore reflect these conceptually distinct hierarchies, rather than be limited to linear scales. Figures from a study in a town and three villages in northwest Iran undertaken in 1973 are analyzed. Findings indicate that for women in towns, as social status increases within both traditional and modern occupational hierarchies (husband's occupation) and as measured by income, education and index of modern items, there is a general and almost monotonic decrease in the number of living children, children ever-born, and ideal number of children, with an increase in age at marriage and contraceptive use. The social and cultural homogeneity of the village sample is reflected in the relatively small variations in fertility-related behaviour and attitudes; however, fertility differences between landed and landless villages appear similar to the pattern found in the urban samples. The differences in the fertility behaviour of village and urban women of similar income and educational status indicate that fertility behaviour is related partially to class and partially to status distinctions between urban and rural communities.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1980 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1980 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1980 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1980 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Bertram Hutchinson;

    Abstract Data obtained from a study of social mobility in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo are used to show how far there exist differences in mobility rates as between immigrant and Brazilian-born sections of the adult population. The Index of Association, based upon a comparison of filial with parental status, while revealing a significant difference in mobility rates as between those of purely Brazilian and those of mixed origin, seems, however, to conceal other significant differences. Among male adults in Sao Paulo, the proportion rising in social status greatly exceeds those who fall a phenomenon made possible by changes in the socioeconomic structure of the city. A distinction must thus be made between exchange mobility and structural mobility, and a possible means of calculating the latter is suggested. An estimate of the degree to which the overall rate of social mobility observed in the city is due to structural change is offered, while further analysis shows that immigrants and their children pr...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1958 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1958 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1958 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1958 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Nyovani Madise; Zoe Matthews; Barrie Margetts;

    Using cross-sectional data from Ghana, Malawˆ i, Nigeria, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, a multilevel analysis was performed to determine the extent of correlation of nutritional status between children in the same family and geographical area. Weight-for-age z-scores were used as a measure of nutritional status for children up to three years of age. The percentage of children who were under-weight ranged from 16 in Zimbabwe up to 36 in Nigeria. The effects of socioeconomic factors and individual characteristics on nutritional status between countries varied. However in all six countries, the child's age was the most important factor associated with nutritional status. A clustering effect at the household level was found in all six countries, ranging from 24 per cent in Tanzania and Zimbabwe to 40 per cent in Malawˆ i. There was also a significant, but smaller, clustering effect at community level for Malawˆ i, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Zambia.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1999 . Peer-reviewed
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      Article . 1999 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: J, Haskey;

    Summary The characteristics of a national sample of over 2,000 couples who divorced in 1979 are analysed according to the social class and socio-economic position of the husband. The demographic variables investigated for social class and socio-economic differentials include ages at marriage and divorce, duration of marriage, previous marital status, family size and the presence of a pre-maritally conceived child. In addition, an age-standardized measure, the 'standardized divorce ratio' is used to summarise the relative rates of divorce for the different social classes and socio-economic groups. Using this measure, the rate of divorce for couples in Social Class I is only half that for the average couple, whereas for couples in Social Class V and couples in which the husband is unemployed it is more than double.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1984 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1984 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1984 . Peer-reviewed
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      Article . 1984 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Jerzy Berent;

    Summary This article contains an analysis of part of the results of an inquiry into social mobility undertaken jointly by the Nuffield Research Unit of the London School of Economics and the Population Investigation Committee, in collaboration with the Ministry of Labour, based on nation-wide sample material collected by the Social Survey in England and Wales in 1949. Grateful acknowledgment is made to the Inter-Departmental Committee on Economic and Social Research for facilitating the collaboration with these government departments. In this paper, the relationship between fertility defined in terms of average family size of marriages of at least twenty years duration and social mobility is discussed. Two aspects of the latter phenomenon are discussed, namely, the position of sons on the social scale in relation to that of their fathers, and the change in the social status of a family in the period between the date of marriage and the date of the inquiry. The conclusions reached stand in apparent contrad...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1952 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1952 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
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      Article . 1952 . Peer-reviewed
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      Article . 1952 . Peer-reviewed
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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
367 Research products (1 rule applied)
  • Authors: Ted A. Telford;

    Age at first marriage is studied in one historical Chinese population reconstituted from the genealogies of 39 lineage groups for the period 1520–1661. By using event-history methods, descriptive measures of age at marriage for various categories of men are generated from fathers' ages at birth of first son as a proxy measure. The covariates of the likelihood of marriage at specific ages are also examined, using Cox's regression analysis. This study confirms an early average age at first marriage of 21–22 years for men, which is comparable to other historical Chinese populations. Some evidence for large proportions of celibate men and marriage in the teens for women in these lineage populations is also presented. Considerable variation in men's age at marriage is evident, primarily accounted for by differences in social status. The study demonstrates the utility of lineage genealogies in Chinese historical demographic studies and shows that the late imperial marriage pattern for this part of China was a ‘...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
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    34
    citations34
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: E. Hazel Denton;

    Summary In this study possible links between marital union status and fertility are examined using Jamaican census data: in Jamaica a fluid pattern of marital relationships exist, with women in common law and legal marriages and in visiting unions. Examination of the statistics showed (a) that inclusion of union status group does explain some of the fertility variance, and (b) that within each union Status category women respond differently to specific economic variables (such as education and employment). For example, women apparently make choices between earning a living or living with a partner, and the latter may involve motherhood as a means of stabilising and maintaining the union. While consideration of differences in fertility among union status groups has generally focused on the length of the relationship, this exploratory study stresses the importance of looking behind such observations to possible economic causes. It is suggested that where fluid marital arrangements exist, the inclusion of un...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
    Population Studies
    Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studies
      Article . 1979 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Emily Grundy;

    Data from the 1971 and 1981 census records of the OPCS Longitudinal Study (LS) members have been used to examine socio-demographic variations in the proportions of elderly people who lived in private households in 1971, but in institutions ten years later. Information on deaths of sample members 1971–85 has also been used as an indicator of the health status of various sub-groups of the LS population. The results show institutionalization rates to increase with age, to be highest for the single, and lowest for the currently married. Living arrangements in 1971 were also associated with differentials in institutionalization. Regression models which included a family/household variable fitted the data rather less well than models that included a marital-status term. Among men aged 65–74 in 1971, higher social class was associated with lower institutionalization. However, among older men aged 75 and over institutionalization rates were lowest for those from Social Class IIIM. An examination of 1971–81 mortal...

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1992 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: K. L. Gillion;

    Abstract In this paper the composition of Indian emigration to Fiji is analysed from documentary data. Most emigrants went as indentured labourers from 1879 to 1916. The system of recruitment, the considerable resistances to emigration and pressure stimulating it, places of origin, age, sex, marital status, economic position, religion and caste and expectations of emigrants are considered ; 75% of the emigrants embarked at Calcutta. In the main they were unaccompanied, young men and women, came from the north-eastern United Provinces, and were a fair cross section of village castes. The emigrants were driven primarily by economic but also by social pressure and intended to return to India. Emigration from Madras differed in some respects. Other Indian emigration to Fiji, of Punjabis and Gujratis particularly, is also discussed.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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    Population Studies
    Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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      Article . 1956 . Peer-reviewed
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  • Authors: Monique Borgerhoff Mulder;

    The effects of marital status on fertility and offspring survivorship are examined with data on six marriage cohorts of Kipsigis women, agro-pastoralists of south western Kenya. Neither marriage order, nor the average number of co-wives married to a man during a woman's reproductive years, is associated with completed family size, nor with any of the components of reproductive performance. The mechanisms whereby polygyny might potentially lower the reproductive performance of polygynously married women in the Kipsigis and other populations are discussed in some detail, with particular reference to resource shortages, sexual and economic favouritism, the observance of post partum taboos, disease, husband's age, co-wife co-operation, education, sterility, and age at menarche and marriage.

    Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
    Population Studies
    Article . 1989 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
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    47
    citations47
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      Population Studiesarrow_drop_down
      Population Studies
      Article . 1989 . Peer-reviewed
      Data sources: Crossref
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