Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
39 Research products (1 rule applied)

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • 15. Life on land

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Jack N. Fenner; Michael K. Gagan; Joan Cowley; Richard Armstrong; +1 Authors

    Archaeological excavations at the Sembiran and Pacung archaeological sites in coastal Bali, Indonesia, have yielded pottery sherds and other material culture that derives from India and other locations on the Asian mainland, demonstrating that about 2000 years ago the north coast of Bali was in contact with cultures from mainland Asia. The area may in fact have hosted a harbour and perhaps even a community of foreign traders or immigrants. The Sembiran and Pacung excavations also yielded human remains from the same time period. We performed strontium, oxygen and carbon stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from nine human skeletons to investigate whether the people interred at Sembiran and Pacung were from the local area or had travelled there from a distant home. Strontium isotope ratios were also measured in seven archaeological pig (Sus cf. scrofa) teeth, one archaeological canid tooth, and five modern snail (Achatina fulica) shells to help identify the local strontium isotope signature. The people interred at Pacung and Sembiran had similar oxygen and carbon isotope ratios but varying strontium isotope ratios which were higher than expected based on geology. Despite the abundance of foreign materials recovered, our isotope data can be most parsimoniously explained as deriving from a group of locally raised individuals who had a varying mix of coastal and inland plant resources in their diets. In addition, strontium isotope ratios from the pig teeth show interesting clustering, suggesting that two or three different husbandry practices may have been employed.

    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
    Article . 2016 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    Data sources: Crossref
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    5
    citations5
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
      Article . 2016 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      Data sources: Crossref
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Nenad Tasić;

    Abstract The site of Vinca is often regarded as a yardstick for the entire Late Neolithic period of southeast Europe. Neolithic farmers, cattle-breeders, fishers, hunters, craftsmen, tradesmen and artists lived here for more than a millennium between 5600 and 4500 B.C. The site contains more than 9 m of cultural deposits, and its exceptional position at the crossroads of natural routes, at the bank of the River Danube, between the vast Pannonian plain and hilly inland made it ideal for scientific research. The site of Vinca-Belo Brdo became known among archaeologists and general public soon after its discovery in 1908. Since then, there three generations of archaeologists have been excavating here. Miloje M. Vasic will be remembered as the first one to bring to light artefacts and dwelling objects of what later became known as the Vinca culture. He had excavated the entire cultural deposit in ten campaigns between 1908 and 1934 at the central part of the site and discovered at least ten dwelling horizons, all yielding rich and abundant archaeological material. The excavations of 1978–1987, led by N. Tasic, D. Srejovic and G. Marjanovic-Vujovic, have ascertained the existence of post Neolithic dwelling horizons dated in the Copper Age, late Bronze Age and Medieval periods. Archaeological material from the site that has been excavated in the course of 105 years has been thoroughly studied, analysed, and published. It seems that it has given all the answers regarding internal division, style and function of pottery, procurement of raw materials, and relationship with other contemporaneous populations, but there are questions which cannot be answered by traditional archaeological means. The ongoing research at Belo Brdo in Vinca which started in 1998 and directed by the author of this text focuses not only on archaeological research but also on attracting and involving experts from different scientific disciplines. Archaeo-botany, archaeo-zoology, geology, geophysics, chemistry, IT, soil sciences, and geography will be used in our attempt to reconstruct some aspects of the palaeoenvironment of the site of Vinca. These new results of applied sciences, combined with archaeological knowledge, will help us answer much more complex questions concerning the relationship of human populations and their environment; explain some of the choices these people made; and perhaps give us an answer as to why they had left the site by the end of the Neolithic.

    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Quaternary Internati...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Quaternary International
    Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    Data sources: Crossref
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    2
    citations2
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Quaternary Internati...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Quaternary International
      Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      Data sources: Crossref
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Clist, Bernard; Kaumba, Mandela; Matonda, Igor; Bostoen, Koen;

    Cet article présente la première description détaillée d’un groupe de poterie encore inconnu provenant de la province du Kongo Central de la République Démocratique du Congo, la poterie Kitala, du site éponyme découvert en 2014 et fouillé en 2014 et 2015. Daté entre calAD 230 et 524, et découvert en surface sur six autres sites au sud du fleuve Congo, sa chronologie recouvre en partie cette de la poterie Kay Ladio située entre calAD 30 et 475. Ces deux groupes de l’Age du Fer Ancien (AFA) possèdent de nombreux traits communs et sont clairement distincts du Ngovo qui représente le plus vieux groupe avec poterie, avant la diffusion de la métallurgie du fer, daté entre 420 calBC et calAD 130. Les utilisateurs de la poterie Kitala produisaient le fer et vivaient dans un environnement de forêts décidues ouvertes avec un accès à des bois caractéristiques de savanes arborées, comme le Bridelia spp., et de galeries forestières comme l’Elaeis guineensis. Une étude détaillée des argiles, des formes et des décors des récipients présentée dans cet article, montre que la poterie Kitala dérive probablement de la poterie Kay Ladio. Alors que le Kitala ne possède pas de points communs avec les poteries Age du Fer Ancien connues sur le littoral Atlantique de la République du Congo vers le nord, il partage certains attributs avec des types de poterie Age du Fer Ancien de la région de Kinshasa. Au cours de l’Age du Fer Ancien, la région du Bas-Congo de l’Afrique centrale possédait une plus grande diversité de types de poteries qu’estimé auparavant. This article presents the first detailed account of a previously unknown Early Iron Age pottery group from the Kongo Central Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The ceramic group is named Kitala ware, after the site where it was first discovered, and excavated in 2014 and 2015. Dated between cal AD 230 and 524 at Kitala, the ware is also documented as surface finds from six other sites south of the Congo River. Its chronology partly overlaps with the previously known Kay Ladio ware dated between cal AD 30 and 475. Both Early Iron Age (EIA) pottery groups share many features and are distinct from Ngovo ware, the province’s earliest pottery group which preceded the arrival of iron metallurgy and dates between 420 cal BC and cal AD 130. The users of Kitala ware had iron metallurgy and lived in a natural environment of open deciduous woods with access to tree species characteristic of wooded savannas, such as Bridelia spp., and gallery forests, such as Elaeis guineensis. The clay properties, shapes, and decoration patterns of Kitala vessels presented in this article indicate that this ceramic group derived from Kay Ladio ware. While it is unrelated to EIA pottery traditions known in the Atlantic Coast region of the Congo Republic to the north, it does share specific features with certain EIA pottery types in the vicinity of Kinshasa. This article shows that during the EIA, the Lower Congo region of Central Africa had more regional variation in ceramic production than previously known.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ African Archaeologic...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    African Archaeological Review
    Other literature type . Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Springer TDM
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    3
    citations3
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ African Archaeologic...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      African Archaeological Review
      Other literature type . Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Springer TDM
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Cramp, Lucy J. E.; Ethier, Jonathan; Urem-Kotsou, Dushka; Bonsall, Clive; +7 Authors

    The spread of early farming across Europe from its origins in Southwest Asia was a culturally transformative process which took place over millennia. Within regions, the pace of the transition was probably related to the particular climatic and environmental conditions encountered, as well as the nature of localized hunter–gatherer and farmer interactions. The establishment of farming in the interior of the Balkans represents the first movement of Southwest Asian livestock beyond their natural climatic range, and widespread evidence now exists for early pottery being used extensively for dairying. However, pottery lipid residues from sites in the Iron Gates region of the Danube in the northern Balkans show that here, Neolithic pottery was being used predominantly for processing aquatic resources. This stands out not only within the surrounding region but also contrasts markedly with Neolithic pottery use across wider Europe. These findings provide evidence for the strategic diversity within the wider cultural and economic practices during the Neolithic, with this exceptional environmental and cultural setting offering alternative opportunities despite the dominance of farming in the wider region.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Proceedings of the R...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences
    Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Royal Society Data Sharing and Accessibility
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    Access Routes
    Green
    hybrid
    40
    citations40
    popularityTop 10%
    influenceAverage
    impulseTop 10%
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Proceedings of the R...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Proceedings of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences
      Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Royal Society Data Sharing and Accessibility
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Daniele Arobba; Chiara Panelli; Rosanna Caramiello; Marzia Gabriele; +1 Authors

    Abstract The systematic examination of the VI and early V millennium BCE pottery from the Arene Candide Cave (Finale Ligure, Western Liguria) revealed several charred macroremains embedded in the paste, as well as imprints of a wide range of botanical remains. The analysis was conducted in stereomicroscopy (10–750 ×) on charred vegetal remains that were either extracted from the ceramic fabric or studied via intracavitary casts. Some of them were further investigated by SEM. Most of the bioclasts belong to cereals: Triticum monococcum , Triticum dicoccum , Hordeum vulgare and phytoliths of Pooideae. We also recognized endocarps belonging to Prunus mahaleb and Rubus cf. R . idaeus and woods of Rosaceae Prunoideae, Quercus t. ilex/coccifera , cf. Juniperus sp. and Pinus t. sylvestris . The imprints of fern fronds attributable to two typical of wetlands - Osmunda regalis and Thelypteris palustris – are of particular interest. The extraction of bioclasts allowed the identification and sampling of organic material suitable for 14 C analysis without damaging ceramics. This constitutes a feasible methodological alternative to those currently in use. The dates obtained on plant remains extracted from potsherds corroborate the currently proposed chrono-cultural seriation for the Impresso-Cardial Complex of the Ligurian-Provencal region.

    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
    Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    Data sources: Crossref
    Hal-Diderot
    Article . 2017
    Data sources: Hal-Diderot
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    14
    citations14
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseTop 10%
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
      Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      Data sources: Crossref
      Hal-Diderot
      Article . 2017
      Data sources: Hal-Diderot
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Milanović Dragan;

    Archaeological investigations carried out between 2008 and 2010 in the east sector of site Bubanj near Nis (Plan 1; Figs. 1-3) confirmed the existence of horizon of the Cernavoda III culture. In features 22, 23 and 31, which are the remains of settlement buildings, have been found archaeological material mostly pottery vessels, which according to style of decoration, technological and morphological characteristics could be ascribed to the initial period of late Eneolithic. Also, the dwelling structures of Krivodol-Salcuþa-Bubanj cultural complex have been recorded in the layer of brown soil with the remains of above mentioned Cernavoda III buildings. In the vertical stratigraphy of trench I (Fig. 4) the mentioned layer was encountered immediately under the layer of whitish/gray ashy soil and thin layer of compact soil of gray color (Fig. 5), which date from the advanced phases of the late Eneolithic and above the early Eneolithic layers. The settlement features recorded during 2009 excavations are parts of the structures from the settlement of Cernavoda III culture (Fig. 6; T. I-III). Feature 22 is section of devastated probably aboveground building, feature 23 is shallow pit and feature 31 is most probably the rubbish pit. Very similar stratigraphy of the site had been recorded by investigations of M. Garasanin in 1954. In the layer of brown soil, the material of Cernavoda III culture was discovered in level III, and in level IV both Cernavoda III and the material of the earlier Krivodol-Salcuþa-Bubanj cultural complex was recorded. These building horizons are at different depths within approximately same area of the trench and have been identified on the basis of considerable amount of daub and stone, two floor levels, wooden building material and fragmented pottery vessels (T. IV-VI). Despite the lack of technical field documentation remains of one above ground structure could be identified at level III according to descriptions from field journal from 1954. Certain finds from level IV indicate that remains of some floors from this level could perhaps be associated with structure from the settlement of Cernavoda III culture. Insufficient investigations and small quantity of published material from the settlements of this period and mostly singlelayered sites with poorly preserved cultural layer resulted in the fact that in certain areas there are only indications for the settlements. The position of the site at Bubanj suggests the importance of controlling the zone of confluence of the Nisava River and the South Morava River where from the roads branched toward north, south, west and east along the river valleys. The investigations of prehistoric settlements carried out so far at the site Bubanj confirm that areas of the Nisava and South Morava valley had been included in the cultural complex Cernavoda III- Boleraz, which covers rather large part of southeast and central Europe. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177020: Arheologija Srbije: Kulturni identitet, integracioni faktori, tehnoloski procesi i uloga centralnog Balkana u razvoju evropske praistorije]

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Starinararrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Starinar
    Article . 2011 . Peer-reviewed
    License: CC BY NC ND
    Data sources: Crossref
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Starinar
    Article . 2011
    Data sources: DOAJ-Articles
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    1
    citations1
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Starinararrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      Starinar
      Article . 2011 . Peer-reviewed
      License: CC BY NC ND
      Data sources: Crossref
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      Starinar
      Article . 2011
      Data sources: DOAJ-Articles
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Blandine Courel; John Meadows; Lara Gonzalez Carretero; Alexandre Lucquin; +10 Authors

    Abstract The Eastern European steppe and forest-steppe is a key region for understanding the emergence of pottery in Europe. The vast region encompasses the basins of two major waterways, the Don and the Volga rivers, and was occupied by hunter-gatherer-fisher communities attracted to highly productive forest/aquatic ecotones. The precise dates for the inception of pottery production in this region and the function of pottery is unknown, but such information is vital for charting the pan-Eurasian dispersal of pottery technology and whether there were common motivations for its adoption. To investigate, we conducted AMS dating, including a re-evaluation of legacy radiocarbon dates together with organic residue analysis and microscopy. The dating programme was able to clarify the sequence and show that hunter-gatherer pottery production was unlikely in this region before the 6th millennium BC. Regarding use, stable isotope and molecular analysis of 160 pottery samples from 35 sites across the region shows that terrestrial animal carcass fats were preferentially processed in pots at Middle Volga sites whereas aquatic resources dominate the residues in pottery from the Middle and Upper Don basin. This is supported by fragments of fish, legumes and grasses in the available charred deposits adhering to the inside of pottery from the Don basin. Since the sites from both river basins had similar environmental settings and were broadly contemporaneous, it is posited that pottery use was under strong cultural control, recognisable as separate sub-regional culinary traditions. The ‘aquatic hypothesis’, previously suggested to explain the emergence of Eurasian pottery, cannot be substantiated in this context.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ CORE (RIOXX-UK Aggre...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    CORE (RIOXX-UK Aggregator)
    Article . 2021
    License: CC BY NC ND
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Quaternary Science Reviews
    Other literature type . Article . 2021 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    11
    citations11
    popularityTop 10%
    influenceTop 10%
    impulseTop 10%
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    visibility12
    visibilityviews12
    downloaddownloads81
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ CORE (RIOXX-UK Aggre...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      CORE (RIOXX-UK Aggregator)
      Article . 2021
      License: CC BY NC ND
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
      Quaternary Science Reviews
      Other literature type . Article . 2021 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • Authors: Jean-Denis Vigne; Isabelle Carrère; François Briois; Jean Guilaine;

    Recent archaeological investigations on Cyprus have unveiled unsuspected Late Glacial and Early Holocene (twelfth–tenth millennia cal BP) pieces of the island’s human history. Based on a review of the archaeological data and of the final results of the archaeozoological analyses of Sector 1 of the prepottery site at Shillourokambos, this paper examines how Cyprus improves our understanding of the process of mammal domestication in the Near East. Early introduction of controlled wild animals and then of early domestic lineages provides information about the modalities of the domestication process on the mainland. This information emphasizes the importance of technical skills, of local opportunities and adaptations, and of long-distance and increasing exchanges in the larger Near East area. Cyprus was a recipient of wild or domestic taxa from the continent through recurrent introductions, but it was fully part of the wider area of incipient farming, as seen in local innovations such as the intensive hunting...

    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    130
    citations130
    popularityTop 1%
    influenceTop 10%
    impulseTop 1%
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Castaneda, Alejandra; Sedov, Sergey; López Aguilar, Fernando; Sánchez Pérez, Serafín; +1 Authors

    International audience; The purpose of this article is to explore the operational chain involved in Xajay's ceramic production through a petrographic and statistical analysis, in order to differentiate the ceramic produced locally from the one that was manufactured in other regions. The collection analyzed for this study comes from the excavations conducted in the main ceremonial center of Xajay culture, known as Pahñu, which was occupied between 300 and 950 AD, and located in the municipality of Tecozautla, Hidalgo, Mexico. The study was based in the petrographic analysis of 21 ceramic samples, and the micromorphologic analysis of 6 soil samples. In order to review the different methods of clay preparation, the samples were first grouped by mineralogical composition to be able to infer their origin related to a same source area. In a second moment, groups were defined in subgroups, taking into consideration proportions, morphology, and size of antiplastic particles. Likewise, the purpose of the micro-morphological analysis was the identification and characterization of soils, in order to correlate soils with corresponding ceramic samples. The analysis allows for an understanding of the dynamics involved in raw material exploitation and clay preparation for the elaboration of ceramic objects used at Pahñu. With regards to the different types of soil used in ceramic production-Vertisol, Luvisol and Feozem-the inhabitants of Pahñu opted for the latter two. The information obtained in this study leads to the conclusion that the Xajay culture produced most of their ceramic assemblage locally and acquired, to a lesser degree, ceramic produced in other regions.; El presente artículo tiene por objetivo evidenciar los elementos constitutivos de las primeras dos etapas de producción en la cadena operatoria de la cerámica de la cultura Xajay, es decir, la etapa de obtención de materias primas a partir de la identificación de los yacimientos de barro y, en segundo lugar, la etapa de preparación de las materias primas para inferir las distintas “recetas” de barro utilizadas para la elaboración de las vasijas. Asimismo, diferenciar entre la cerámica producida localmente y aquella procedente de otras regiones. La colección analizada proviene de las excavaciones realizadas en el principal centro ceremonial Xajay conocido como Pahñu, ocupado entre el 300 d. C. y el 950 d. C, localizado en municipio de Tecozautla, Hidalgo. El estudio fue realizado a partir de un análisis petrográfico (21 muestras cerámicas) y micromorfológico (6 muestras de suelo). El primero consistió en agrupar las muestras que compartieran una composición mineralógica para inferir una misma procedencia o yacimiento de materias primas, posteriormente se generaron subgrupos tomando en cuenta proporciones, morfología y tamaño de partículas para estudiar las distintas formas de preparación del barro. El análisis micromorfológico tuvo por objetivo la identificación y caracterización de los suelos para su posterior correlación con las muestras cerámicas. El análisis petrográfico evidenció la existencia de 4 grupos (2 locales y 2 foráneos), y 12 subgrupos de pastas (10 locales y 2 foráneos) correspondientes a distintas recetas de elaboración de barro. El análisis micromorfológico permitió definir tres tipos de suelos: feozem, luvisol y vertisol. A partir de los resultados obtenidos se lograron comprender las dinámicas de explotación y preparación del barro para la elaboración de los objetos cerámicos consumidos en Pahñu. Se propone entonces que el grupo Xajay producía la mayoría de la parafernalia cerámica localizada en sus sitios, y en menor proporción obtenían cerámica producida en otras regiones (al menos dos, no determinadas en esta investigación). Dentro de los distintos tipos de suelos —vertisol, luvisol y feozem—ellos optaron por la utilización de los últimos dos.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ LAReferencia - Red F...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Boletín de la Sociedad Geológica Mexicana
    Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
    Data sources: Crossref
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    0
    citations0
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Sylvain Ozainne; Laurent Lespez; Aline Garnier; Aziz Ballouche; +3 Authors

    Although understanding the emergence of agriculture in West Africa has recently benefited from major advances, the reasons for its fast diffusion south of the Sahara remain to be explained. We propose here a reconstruction of African agriculture expansion built from a spatialization of available archaeological data and associated radiocarbon dates. With this approach, we can show that the initial spread of food production occurred with some specific rhythms. From this structure, we discuss the potential underlying processes. Our work suggests that the spread of agriculture in West Africa cannot be explained by a simple response to an abrupt environmental change at the beginning of the Late Holocene, but rather by a combined climate-culture mechanism. In addition, cord-wrapped roulette-impressed pottery appears to be a good indicator of the expansion of agro-pastoralist populations in Sub-Saharan regions. Our results are also consistent with the assumption of a monophyletic origin of domestic pearl millet in south-western Sahara and strengthen the idea that the first cultivators were Saharan pastoralists.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ Archive ouverte UNIG...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Journal of Archaeological Science
    Article . 2014 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    38
    citations38
    popularityTop 10%
    influenceTop 10%
    impulseTop 10%
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
39 Research products (1 rule applied)
  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Jack N. Fenner; Michael K. Gagan; Joan Cowley; Richard Armstrong; +1 Authors

    Archaeological excavations at the Sembiran and Pacung archaeological sites in coastal Bali, Indonesia, have yielded pottery sherds and other material culture that derives from India and other locations on the Asian mainland, demonstrating that about 2000 years ago the north coast of Bali was in contact with cultures from mainland Asia. The area may in fact have hosted a harbour and perhaps even a community of foreign traders or immigrants. The Sembiran and Pacung excavations also yielded human remains from the same time period. We performed strontium, oxygen and carbon stable isotope analyses of tooth enamel from nine human skeletons to investigate whether the people interred at Sembiran and Pacung were from the local area or had travelled there from a distant home. Strontium isotope ratios were also measured in seven archaeological pig (Sus cf. scrofa) teeth, one archaeological canid tooth, and five modern snail (Achatina fulica) shells to help identify the local strontium isotope signature. The people interred at Pacung and Sembiran had similar oxygen and carbon isotope ratios but varying strontium isotope ratios which were higher than expected based on geology. Despite the abundance of foreign materials recovered, our isotope data can be most parsimoniously explained as deriving from a group of locally raised individuals who had a varying mix of coastal and inland plant resources in their diets. In addition, strontium isotope ratios from the pig teeth show interesting clustering, suggesting that two or three different husbandry practices may have been employed.

    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
    Article . 2016 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    Data sources: Crossref
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    5
    citations5
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Journal of Archaeolo...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Journal of Archaeological Science Reports
      Article . 2016 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      Data sources: Crossref
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Authors: Nenad Tasić;

    Abstract The site of Vinca is often regarded as a yardstick for the entire Late Neolithic period of southeast Europe. Neolithic farmers, cattle-breeders, fishers, hunters, craftsmen, tradesmen and artists lived here for more than a millennium between 5600 and 4500 B.C. The site contains more than 9 m of cultural deposits, and its exceptional position at the crossroads of natural routes, at the bank of the River Danube, between the vast Pannonian plain and hilly inland made it ideal for scientific research. The site of Vinca-Belo Brdo became known among archaeologists and general public soon after its discovery in 1908. Since then, there three generations of archaeologists have been excavating here. Miloje M. Vasic will be remembered as the first one to bring to light artefacts and dwelling objects of what later became known as the Vinca culture. He had excavated the entire cultural deposit in ten campaigns between 1908 and 1934 at the central part of the site and discovered at least ten dwelling horizons, all yielding rich and abundant archaeological material. The excavations of 1978–1987, led by N. Tasic, D. Srejovic and G. Marjanovic-Vujovic, have ascertained the existence of post Neolithic dwelling horizons dated in the Copper Age, late Bronze Age and Medieval periods. Archaeological material from the site that has been excavated in the course of 105 years has been thoroughly studied, analysed, and published. It seems that it has given all the answers regarding internal division, style and function of pottery, procurement of raw materials, and relationship with other contemporaneous populations, but there are questions which cannot be answered by traditional archaeological means. The ongoing research at Belo Brdo in Vinca which started in 1998 and directed by the author of this text focuses not only on archaeological research but also on attracting and involving experts from different scientific disciplines. Archaeo-botany, archaeo-zoology, geology, geophysics, chemistry, IT, soil sciences, and geography will be used in our attempt to reconstruct some aspects of the palaeoenvironment of the site of Vinca. These new results of applied sciences, combined with archaeological knowledge, will help us answer much more complex questions concerning the relationship of human populations and their environment; explain some of the choices these people made; and perhaps give us an answer as to why they had left the site by the end of the Neolithic.

    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Quaternary Internati...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    Quaternary International
    Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Elsevier TDM
    Data sources: Crossref
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    2
    citations2
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Quaternary Internati...arrow_drop_down
      image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
      Quaternary International
      Article . 2017 . Peer-reviewed
      License: Elsevier TDM
      Data sources: Crossref
      addClaim

      This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

      You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
  • image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    Authors: Clist, Bernard; Kaumba, Mandela; Matonda, Igor; Bostoen, Koen;

    Cet article présente la première description détaillée d’un groupe de poterie encore inconnu provenant de la province du Kongo Central de la République Démocratique du Congo, la poterie Kitala, du site éponyme découvert en 2014 et fouillé en 2014 et 2015. Daté entre calAD 230 et 524, et découvert en surface sur six autres sites au sud du fleuve Congo, sa chronologie recouvre en partie cette de la poterie Kay Ladio située entre calAD 30 et 475. Ces deux groupes de l’Age du Fer Ancien (AFA) possèdent de nombreux traits communs et sont clairement distincts du Ngovo qui représente le plus vieux groupe avec poterie, avant la diffusion de la métallurgie du fer, daté entre 420 calBC et calAD 130. Les utilisateurs de la poterie Kitala produisaient le fer et vivaient dans un environnement de forêts décidues ouvertes avec un accès à des bois caractéristiques de savanes arborées, comme le Bridelia spp., et de galeries forestières comme l’Elaeis guineensis. Une étude détaillée des argiles, des formes et des décors des récipients présentée dans cet article, montre que la poterie Kitala dérive probablement de la poterie Kay Ladio. Alors que le Kitala ne possède pas de points communs avec les poteries Age du Fer Ancien connues sur le littoral Atlantique de la République du Congo vers le nord, il partage certains attributs avec des types de poterie Age du Fer Ancien de la région de Kinshasa. Au cours de l’Age du Fer Ancien, la région du Bas-Congo de l’Afrique centrale possédait une plus grande diversité de types de poteries qu’estimé auparavant. This article presents the first detailed account of a previously unknown Early Iron Age pottery group from the Kongo Central Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The ceramic group is named Kitala ware, after the site where it was first discovered, and excavated in 2014 and 2015. Dated between cal AD 230 and 524 at Kitala, the ware is also documented as surface finds from six other sites south of the Congo River. Its chronology partly overlaps with the previously known Kay Ladio ware dated between cal AD 30 and 475. Both Early Iron Age (EIA) pottery groups share many features and are distinct from Ngovo ware, the province’s earliest pottery group which preceded the arrival of iron metallurgy and dates between 420 cal BC and cal AD 130. The users of Kitala ware had iron metallurgy and lived in a natural environment of open deciduous woods with access to tree species characteristic of wooded savannas, such as Bridelia spp., and gallery forests, such as Elaeis guineensis. The clay properties, shapes, and decoration patterns of Kitala vessels presented in this article indicate that this ceramic group derived from Kay Ladio ware. While it is unrelated to EIA pottery traditions known in the Atlantic Coast region of the Congo Republic to the north, it does share specific features with certain EIA pottery types in the vicinity of Kinshasa. This article shows that during the EIA, the Lower Congo region of Central Africa had more regional variation in ceramic production than previously known.

    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/ African Archaeologic...arrow_drop_down
    image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open_Access_logo_PLoS_white.svg art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos http://www.plos.org/
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    image/svg+xml Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao Closed Access logo, derived from PLoS Open Access logo. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Closed_Access_logo_transparent.svg Jakob Voss, based on art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina and Beao
    African Archaeological Review
    Other literature type . Article . 2019 . Peer-reviewed
    License: Springer TDM
    addClaim

    This Research product is the result of merged Research products in OpenAIRE.

    You have already added works in your ORCID record related to the merged Research product.
    3
    citations3
    popularityAverage
    influenceAverage
    impulseAverage
    BIP!Powered by BIP!
    more_vert
      image/svg+xml art designer at PLoS, modified by Wikipedia users Nina, Beao, JakobVoss, and AnonMoos Open Access logo, converted into svg, designed by PLoS. This version with transparent background. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Open