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The following results are related to Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
33 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • 2012-2021
  • AU
  • CN
  • AE

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2012
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cecil A. L. Pearson; Klaus Helms;
    Publisher: InTech

    The north eastern part of the Northern Territory (NT) is East Arnhem Land. This expanse of Australia is the homeland of the Indigenous Yolngu clans whose forbears occupied the land some 50,000 years ago. These people survived in a nomadic lifestyle of hunter gatherers on their traditional land (Altman, 2002; 2003). Historical records show that from the 17th Century Indigenous Yolngu traded with seafarers from China, the Celebes, Japan, the Netherlands and even sailors navigating the great southern land (Berndt & Berndt, 1999; Worsely, 1955). Over 300 years later within the first quarter of the 20th Century, the Methodist Church began to develop the coastal region of East Arnhem Land, and thus, began the congregation of Indigenous communities (Trudgen, 2000). Living in this inhospitable land obliged the non Indigenous settlers to use available material to establish structures and facilities vital to sustain a string of mission stations. A primary resource was cypress pine (callitris intratropica) which was resistant to termites, the indefatigable predators of other timbers, and this was the beginning of merchandising the timber industry in East Arnhem Land.

  • Authors: 
    Catherine J. Frieman; Anne Teather; Chelsea Morgan;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    Normative notions of sex and gender were prevalent in discussion of European prehistoric societies until the last quarter of the 20th century. The progressive work that challenged a binary approach...

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Andrea Cleland;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing

    Ongoing war prompted large-scale outward mass migration from Greece to Australia during the 1950s–1970s. By 1983, almost a quarter of a million Greeks had come to Australia as permanent and long-term arrivals. The largest group was from the Macedonian region of Greece, including Florina. This chapter examines how migrants who left Florina in the 1950s and 1960s and their children and grandchildren narrate cross-generational experiences of migration. It considers how collective family memory can shape transnational notions of belonging and how family migration stories of a contested home and identity can become limited in circulation across generations. Despite a greater belonging as Australian by the third generation, there remains a desire to remember the migrant legacy and understand their Greek Macedonian heritage.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Closed Access
    Authors: 
    John Wiseman;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing

    This chapter employs a thought experiment, the 2050 Zero-Carbon World Oration to take stock of the reality that even the most rapid and decisive climate change action is still likely to lead us to a world far more challenging than the planet on which human civilisations have developed and flourished. Looking back from 2050, this story is told through a fictional Oration delivered by Professor Teuila Apatu, Director of the Global Institute for Climate and Energy Transitions, reviewing the key events, decisions and actions which drove the great twenty-first-century energy transition at remarkable speed and scale. While celebrating and honouring the impressive progress made by 2050 towards achieving the global goal of zero net emissions, Professor Apatu also notes the severe ecological damage and human suffering caused by the failure to reduce emissions at sufficient speed in the first quarter of the twenty-first century.

  • Authors: 
    Joel Crotty;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    Peter Sculthorpe’s Music for Japan was commissioned by the Australian Youth Orchestra for performance at Expo ’70 (1970) in Osaka, Japan, the first World Exposition to be held in Asia. A number of studies have been published that examine the composition’s experimental content but none to date have explored the question of how the work reinforced or otherwise the ethos of Expo ’70, or the rationale for Sculthorpe’s revision of the work around a quarter of a century later. Originally positioned as reflecting Sculthorpe’s interest in the music of Japan and an example of his Euro-Asian aesthetic, the composer felt the need to rework the score in 1996 to allow him to re-affirm his Australianness. The didjeridu became a symbol of that aspiration. Music for Japan is an offshore gift that was revised to make it onshore acceptable (at least to the composer), but the result leaves one unsure about the process.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Vriesekoop; Jing Chen; Jenna Oldaker; Flavien Besnard; Reece Smith; William Leversha; Cheralee Smith-Arnold; Julie Worrall; Emily Rufray; Qipeng Yuan; +3 more
    Publisher: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute

    In this study we report the underlying reasons to why bacteria are present on banknotes and coins. Despite the use of credit cards, mobile phone apps, near-field-communication systems, and cryptocurrencies such as bitcoins which are replacing the use of hard currencies, cash exchanges still make up a significant means of exchange for a wide range of purchases. The literature is awash with data that highlights that both coins and banknotes are frequently identified as fomites for a wide range of microorganisms. However, most of these publications fail to provide any insight into the extent to which bacteria adhere and persist on money. We treated the various currencies used in this study as microcosms, and the bacterial loading from human hands as the corresponding microbiome. We show that the substrate from which banknotes are produced have a significant influence on both the survival and adherence of bacteria to banknotes. Smooth, polymer surfaces provide a poor means of adherence and survival, while coarser and more fibrous surfaces provide strong bacterial adherence and an environment to survive on. Coins were found to be strongly inhibitory to bacteria with a relatively rapid decline in survival on almost all coin surfaces tested. The inhibitory influence of coins was demonstrated through the use of antimicrobial disks made from coins. Despite the toxic effects of coins on many bacteria, bacteria do have the ability to adapt to the presence of coins in their environment which goes some way to explain the persistent presence of low levels of bacteria on coins in circulation.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Kay Whitehead;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing

    The last quarter of the nineteenth century was a period of rapid educational, social and political change in colonial South Australia. White settler middle-class women were securing niches as teachers in the expanding secular state school system along with some Catholic lay teachers who were marginalised by a new religious teaching order, the Institute of the Sisters of St Joseph. The movement for women’s suffrage gathered momentum in South Australia, achieving success in 1894, but also exposing tensions in gender relations in the colony. Firstly, this chapter explores the relations between white settler men and women educators in the state school system, intertwining vignettes of seven potential candidates for the position of Australia’s first woman school inspector. The following sections discuss the controversy surrounding the woman inspector’s appointment in 1897, and the tenure of the successful applicant, Blanche McNamara, in post-suffrage South Australia.

  • Authors: 
    Mervyn J. Eadie;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited

    A quarter of a millennium ago, Samuel Tissot (1728-1797), a Swiss physician who had achieved a substantial European reputation, authored a monograph entitled Traite de l'epilepsie. The book was translated into several European languages and appeared in various editions over the following 70 years, although an English-language version was never published. In his Traite, Tissot provided a thorough account and critical analysis of the previous relevant literature concerning epilepsy, added data from his own experience in practice, and raised issues, some of which remain important today. The appearance of the book was propitious, occurring during the period of the European Enlightenment, when medicine was increasingly divesting itself of ancient modes of thinking and veneration for the opinions of great names from the remote past. At least in Western Europe, the Traite de l'epilepsie became an intellectual launching pad for the considerable expansion in knowledge of epilepsy that occurred over the century or longer that followed its publication.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anne Best;
    Publisher: James Cook University

    Similarities and differences in aspects of the culture of the Aboriginal people of the Wellesley Islands, has been noted by European writers. This remote island group is situated in the southern region of the Gulf of Carpentaria, northwest Queensland. Observed differences appear to demonstrate dissimilarities in certain cultural manifestations between the North Wellesley Islands (Mornington and Forsyth) and the South Wellesley Islands (Bentinck and Sweers). These include language, social organisation, land-use, ritual and ceremonial practices and manufactured objects of material culture. However, other cultural practices, namely an economy based on marine resources, are shared throughout the region. The data used here focus on items of portable material culture used by the people of the Wellesley Islands and the adjacent mainland coast at a time before intensified social disruptions to Aboriginal people in the area was brought about by increased European presence and by the establishment of missions in the region in the first quarter of the twentieth century. All items are from museum collections and were collected no later than 1916. Using a relational database, the morphological variations present in the objects are quantified and analysed. The study area is divided into three regional zones; the North Wellesley Islands, the South Wellesley Islands and the Adjacent Mainland Coast. In the region, four different languages are spoken and the data are also analysed by language group. The aim of the study is to determine whether quantifiable regional variation can be demonstrated. This article intentionally focuses narrowly on portable objects of material culture. For references to wider cultural aspects of the study area, see Roth (1897, 1901, 1903), Tindale (1977), Trigger (1987), Robins et al. (1998), Evans (2005), Memmott (2010), whose work has previously explored similarity and difference in the culture of the region as well as theoretical discussions of the reasons for these differences.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    John Connell;
    Publisher: Island Studies Journal

    Small islands are disadvantaged by conventional development strategies and have sought unusual means of achieving economic development and raising their global profiles. The small Channel Island of Alderney, with a largely non-existent physical resource base, and steady population decline, has sought to develop several service sector activities, increasingly involving the internet and virtual activities. Internet gambling has proved successful. Bitcoin minting offers unique possibilities. Alderney has achieved economic development without significant local assets other than creativity and ingenuity, and a somewhat distinctive political status.